Search
  • webmaster045

August 24 1917

Dimock – A good day, good roads and public interest brought a record breaking crowd to the old Camp ground last Sunday. Teams, trains and automobiles, largely the last named—there were 695 parked on the grounds during the day—brought more than 5,000 people to the encampment. Three states were represented, Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey. Rev. Geo. O. Beers has the unique distinction of having attended every session of the Dimock camp-meeting since its founding, 43 years ago. For 30 years he has been the official bell-ringer, and has never failed in his duty.


New Milford – John A. McConnell, one of the best known and highly esteemed citizens of this place, died at his home on the Montrose road on Aug. 12, 1917, of heart trouble, aged 76 years. He was born in Ireland and when he was 12 years of age the family came to this country and located in Harford township. About 50 years ago he married Miss Ellen Aldrich and moved on the farm where he died. For many years he specialized in growing berries and small fruit. He is survived by his aged widow, one son, Elmer McConnell, one daughter, Mrs. Joseph Matthews, and six grandchildren; also one brother and one sister. Interment in New Milford Cemetery. ALSO Fred J. Dexter, manager of the New Milford poor farm, was operated upon for appendicitis on Aug. 9th. He has been in a serious condition but is now much improved.


West Auburn – I.L. Possinger and son, Eldred, took in the Sousa band concert at Johnson City. Merton Bolles returned with them for a visit with West Auburn friends. In South Auburn an auto load, consisting of Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Vandervort, Mrs. John Cooper and three children, Miss Westbrook and Miss Wall, all from Laceyville, were guests at Wm. N. Judson’s, on Saturday evening, a night blooming cereus being the attraction. Seven beautiful flowers were open that evening and twenty were opened during the last week, filling the air with their fragrance, besides making a fine porch display.


Friendsville – Rev. Father James has returned to St. Ann’s monastery, Scranton, after conducting the forty hours’ devotion in each of the three churches of the Friendsville parish.


Forest Lake – One hundred and thirty-five were present at the 15th annual reunion of the Canfield Stone descendants, which met at Forest Lake on Aug. 4, at the Bradshaw camp, coming from New York city, Binghamton, Utica, Endicott, Johnson City, Scranton, Towanda, Meshoppen, Susquehanna, LeRaysville, Montrose, Birchardville and vicinity. The decorations were flags, flowers and ferns.


South Montrose/Montrose – Owing to the shortage of male help, the slat factory is making plans to employ women and girls in operating the wood-working machines and doing such labor as is usually the work of men. G.R. McKeage, of the Beach Manufacturing Co., in Montrose, is also seriously considering employing young women to operate such machines in his new plant as can be readily done. The large number of young men who have enlisted in the army and navy from this section and the usual labor shortage will make it necessary to employ female help if the plants are to be run at their normal capacity.


Clifford – While L.E. Lee was coming across a private bridge belonging to E.G. Greene, with a load of hay, one of the girders gave way and the team was precipitated into the water. Fortunately no damage was done to the team or driver. The hay had to be reloaded. ALSO Rev. Ackley will give his famous lecture, “Booze or Beef?” in the Baptist church, next Monday evening. Several people from a distance will be present and some good music has been arranged.


Towanda – A reunion of the survivors of the 141st Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, will be held here on Wednesday, August 29th.


Forest City – The Independents vanquished Dick Monaghan’s Carbondale Pets by a score of 15-9. There were many rooters from Carbondale who returned deeply chagrined at the defeat administered. Wargo and Payne were the battery for the locals and the opposing battery were Lynch and Kelley. The collections, as usual, were far from what they ought to be.


Herrick Twp. – Miss Pearl M. Price the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D.Q. Price, and Stanley S. Jones, of Kenten, Delaware, were united in marriage at Binghamton on Tuesday of last week. They are stopping at the home of the bride’s parents for a short time. They will reside in Delaware where the groom has large landed interests. The bride has been a member of the school faculty of Kenten the past three years and formerly taught in this county.


Uniondale – Born on Sunday to Mr. and Mrs. John Burdick, a son. They are now the possessors of six sons and two daughters. Mrs. Burdick is being cared for by her mother, Mrs. S.S. Coleman, of Binghamton.


Fiddle Lake – Leonard Walker and wife, of Elmira, NY came out to attend the reunion which was held at the home of his mother, Mrs. Jones Walker, on the Summit. Nathan Walker, of Vandling, also James Walker, of Carbondale were present.


News Brief: All records for oleomargarine licenses in Pennsylvania have been broken during the past six months and the close of July found 3,310 licenses granted as compared with 2,534 at the same time last year. As there is a big rush for licenses during September and October, it is expected that the total for 1917 will be close to 4,000.


200 Years Ago from the Montrose Centinel, August 23, 1817.

*LARGE SNAKE. (From Erie newspaper). On the 3d inst., 30 miles below this place and three miles from land, the crew of the schooner, Gen. Scott, saw a serpent 35 or 40 feet in length, and its neck, which it put out of the water a few yards from the vessel, 10 or 12 inches in diameter. Its color was a dark mahogany, nearly black. The lake was smooth and they had a perfect view of it for more than a minute.

*NOTICE. The Democratic Republicans of the township of Bridgewater are requested to attend a meeting to be holden at the Montrose Hotel, on Saturday the 23 Inst.,* for the purpose of choosing two delegates to represent said township in the County Convention to be holden on Court week. By order of Committee, Aug. 16, 1817.

[*Inst. means the week of. Alt means the week previous.]

Recent Posts

See All

January 02 1920

Montrose – Seven prisoners escaped from County Jail early Christmas night. They managed to affect their escape and all but one, the youngest, were recaptured. Chance led the last man to get through th

December 26 1919

Susquehanna – Daniel Smith, of Lanesboro, a switchman in the Susquehanna Railroad yards, was instantly killed by passenger train No. 5, Dec. 20, 1919. He had been in the switchmen’s shanty getting war

December 19 1919

Herrick Twp. – Gardner Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel G. Lee, near Tirzah, accidentally shot himself and passed away almost instantly. He had been out hunting and came to the school house at Dart’