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June 22 1917

Herrick Center –Mr. Crippen, D & H claims News Brief: The fashion editor of the Woman’s Home Companion says: “Something is going into the summer girl’s trunk this year that has never gone into it before! Have you guessed already that ‘it” is overalls, and that she has taken the hint from the busy, capable women in Europe, who have been doing men’s work since the war started? The American girl is a level-headed young person, and when she is planning her clothes she considers carefully their appropriateness. That’s why she is looking with favor this summer on the new overalls for women that have just been put upon the market. “The shops are displaying them in cool, durable materials, selected purposely for summer wear. They come in percale and denim in solid colors, and in most attractive stripes, and also in the very durable khaki shade. They consist of an easy-to-get-into coat, and overalls which are full enough to suggest in themselves that they will be donned not by mere man, but a very feminine young person. ALSO A new bill to prohibit manufacture during the war of foodstuffs into distilled spirits and malt liquors, was ordered reported today by the senate agriculture committee. Another provision of the bill would empower the president to requisition existing supplies of distilled spirits if necessary to conserve food supplies or to secure alcohol for war purposes. agent, was in town and called at Carl Bonham’s home. Little Elsie Bonham, who was struck by a train at the crossing here on May 14th, is making a good recovery.


Springville – The marriage of Miss Grace Tuttle, of this place, to Mr. Olin Mittan, of Lenoxville, took place at the M.E. parsonage on June 6th, Rev. W.H. Stang officiating. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.B. Tuttle, and for several years has been a popular and efficient clerk at Lee Bros’ store. Mr. Mittan is the principal of the High school at this place and has made many friends. The young couple kept the affair a secret until an hour before the ceremony, but their departure was enlivened by a merry party of young people. They have the best wishes of their many friends for a long and happy wedded life.


Dimock – Perry Mills seems to be the boss fisherman hereabouts. He returns many mornings from Elk Lake with a large string of bullheads and eels.


Little Meadows – Three young farmers of this place brought brides to their homes last week, namely: M.J. McNamara and Miss Lucy McKale; J.J. Purtell and Mary C. Murphy, and Frank Welch and bride. All heartily welcomed the young couples and wish them a long and happy life in our midst.


Clifford – Our new jitney bus, from Carbondale, is now making trips to this town when occasion requires.


Montrose – Dr. H.V. Frink bought a Ford runabout recently. He thought anyone could run a Ford, and started out. Coming down Maple street he overtook E.D. Jenkins and Miss Hester Vreeland in an automobile, Miss Vreeland being at the wheel. “Doc” got a little flustered and, although the street is wide at this point, he took off a wheel and a portion of the guard from Mr. Jenkins’ machine. “Doc” is now taking instructions from H.M. Cole.


Brooklyn – Last Saturday evening, in the I.O.O.F. hall, a reception was held for Brooklyn boys who have been accepted and will leave this week to go in training for the service of their country. They are: Hugh Weston, Wayne VanAuken, Archie Richardson, Arthur Tiffany and Allen Judge. Myron Craver, Lawrence Savige, Sidney Hughes and the Rev. J.A. Judge are already in the service.


Fair Hill, Forest Lake Twp. – Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Brearley and daughter, Lillian, and Mrs. M.O. [Marion O.] Evans were over to Silas Jagger’s Sunday. He had the misfortune to break the wishbone to his car. Mrs. Evans is 93 years old and retains all her faculties and is piecing quilts. [Marion O. Evans lived to age 98.]


Heart Lake – Supt. F.J. Aldrich has opened the large ice house and is shipping ice regularly.


Silver Lake – Miss Mary Meehan died at her home here on Sunday, June 10. The deceased was born and had lived in that township all her life and her kind disposition endeared her to all who knew her. Her funeral was held from St. Augustine’s church. She is survived by three brothers and two sisters: John, Dennis and Edward Meehan and Nellie and Margaret Meehan, all residing at home.


Flynn, Middletown Twp. – On Wednesday, June 6th, at St. John the Bap;tist church in this place, Miss Mary Murphy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Murphy, of Flynn and John J. Purtell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Purtell, of Apolacon, were united in Holy Matrimony by their pastor, Rev. J. P. Dunne. They were attended by Miss Jane Guiton, cousin of the bride and Mr. James Purtell, brother of the bride. The bride was handsomely gowned in white silk taffeta, trimmed with white Georgette crepe, and wore a large, white, picture hat, trimmed with blue. The groom wore the conventional black. The bride, a teacher and groom, who has been an enterprising merchant of the firm of Purtell & Coleman, has purchased a farm near Little Meadows, where he, with his bride, have gone to reside.


Ararat – Mr. and Mrs. T.F. Archer left for a trip to Lake Odessa, Michigan, to meet his brother, Thomas Archer, whom he had not seen in 52 years. He is now past 80 and came to Odessa to visit the widow and family of his brother, George Archer, deceased.


Forest City News – W.T. Jones of the Bowery section is learning to ride a motorcycle. He has had considerable experience with mules but thinks that for downright stubbornness the motorcycle takes the cake. Were it not for his life insurance, which he prizes too much to have settled now, he might in time succeed as a rider.


Marriage Licenses were issued to: James Shields and Willa Zeller, of Susquehanna; Charles Morse and Helen Mulinex, of Great Bend; Ernest P. Chamberlin, of Hallstead and Florence E. Hamlin, of Great Bend; Stephen Carpenter, of Starrucca and Elizabeth Crissell, of Thompson.


News Brief: The fashion editor of the Woman’s Home Companion says: “Something is going into the summer girl’s trunk this year that has never gone into it before! Have you guessed already that ‘it” is overalls, and that she has taken the hint from the busy, capable women in Europe, who have been doing men’s work since the war started? The American girl is a level-headed young person, and when she is planning her clothes she considers carefully their appropriateness. That’s why she is looking with favor this summer on the new overalls for women that have just been put upon the market. “The shops are displaying them in cool, durable materials, selected purposely for summer wear. They come in percale and denim in solid colors, and in most attractive stripes, and also in the very durable khaki shade. They consist of an easy-to-get-into coat, and overalls which are full enough to suggest in themselves that they will be donned not by mere man, but a very feminine young person. ALSO A new bill to prohibit manufacture during the war of foodstuffs into distilled spirits and malt liquors, was ordered reported today by the senate agriculture committee. Another provision of the bill would empower the president to requisition existing supplies of distilled spirits, if necessary, to conserve food supplies or to secure alcohol for war purposes.


200 Years Ago from the Montrose Centinel, June 22, 1817.

*The late freshet has raised the creeks higher than they have been for years before. Last Saturday night the rain fell very fast. Considerable damage was done to mill dams in this town. Maj. Post’s saw-mill dam was nearly one half taken away; Messrs.Conner and Bliss’s dam received serious injury; and Mr. John Street had not only his dam entirely swept away, but his mill was started from its foundation. Considerable damage, we understand, has been done to the crops on the flats, over which the water flowed, and the bridges over the creeks in many places were taken off.

*DISTRESSING SHIPWRECK. The British vessel Angelica was lately foundered while on her passage from the Cape of Good Hope to the Isle of France, and all on board perished. Among those unfortunate persons were John James Armstrong, Esq. late American consul at Teneriffe, and his family, consisting of Mrs. Armstrong, seven children, two nephews, and a servant. Mrs. A. was formerly Miss Dumest, a native of the city of Baltimore.

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