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December 22 1916

Montrose – When Judge Denney called the hotelmen of this place before him and asked them if, in the event of his granting their licenses, they would observe the rule not to sell in bottles, to which they all agreed, it looked very much as though all of their licenses would be granted. It was therefore somewhat of a surprise when Judge Denney announced that the licenses of the Tarbell House, conducted by D.J. Donovan, and the Montrose House, conducted by T.L. Dolan, were refused on the grounds of violations. The judge said that in his estimation the hotels had been reasonably well conducted and that there was no disposition on the part of the landlords to break the laws, but the violations were due to inattention on the part of the bartenders. It is even rumored that Landlord Donlin is considering the advisability of not taking up his license—running a temperance house, as he will have the only licensed house in this part of the county, the southern and western parts being practically “dry.” Mr. Donlin is one of the most careful of hotel men in the observance of the law, but naturally feels any intemperance will be attributed to the one licensed house in this section. ALSO The Christmas exercises which were to have been held by the Presbyterian Sunday School on Tuesday evening next, have been postponed as so many of the children who were to have participated are having the measles.


Clifford – Relatives and friends of Dr. Robert A. Brundage received word that he had been killed at Pittsburg by being run down by an automobile on Friday, November 30. The remains arrived in Peckville and a brief funeral took place from his parents’ home on Sunday morning. The remains were then taken to Clifford, where additional services were held in the Clifford Baptist church and burial made. Dr. Brundage was born Dec. 28, 1880 and after attending a country school he entered Keystone Academy and graduated. He attended the University of Michigan and Jefferson Medical College and after extensive travels to study he settled in Pittsburg as an ear, nose and throat specialist.


Gibson – W. J. Lamb and H. C. Estabrook are papering the Baptist church at Jackson.


Williams’ Pond, Bridgewater Twp. – On account of the illness of our teacher, Miss Horton, there was no school last week.


Lynn, Springville Twp. – Miss Hazel Conrad, who is teaching at Lynn, delightfully entertained her pupils at her home on Friday evening, Dec. 15. The evening was spent in music, songs, recitations, etc. Dainty refreshments were served. Those who were in attendance were: Emma Hooven, Leon Williams, Oscar Canfield, Claude Button, Willard Hooven, Herbert Jennings, Guy Davis and Albert Jennings. Miss Conrad has recently organized an Audubon Society in her school. The purpose of the society is for the study and protection of wild birds, in which great interest is being taken. A class is being conducted every month.


Rush - Seventy one creameries in Pennsylvania competed in the creamery butter contest at State College this year and the three highest average scores of those who took part in all seven contests during the year were received by the following men in order: W.J. Smith, Millerton, Pa., first prize; Oscar Hardic, Rush, Pa., second prize; H.E. Hobbs, Meshoppen, Pa., third prize.


Springville – All the stores are open evenings during the holiday season, but trade is not up to the usual standard owing to the increased cost of everything. ALSO The young people gave a shower to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smales who were married last week.


South Auburn – The men who are interested in providing wood for the church worked several days last week, instead of one as was announced as the day for the bee, and still there is much to be done and an opportunity for any who may care to help.


Dimock – Byron Benninger has bought the farm of Raymond Gregory, the late H.D. Johnson place, and will move there on March 1st.


Uniondale – Miss Lottie Norton, for a number of years [our] telephone operator, has resigned and will remove to Binghamton.


Brooklyn – A pleasant surprise was given Albert Gere on Saturday evening when six or seven young married couples enjoyed the evening at his home. ALSO Brooklyn H.S. seniors will hold a box social at the home of M. Aldrich, near Alford, Dec. 29. Sleigh loads from Brooklyn will leave the post office at 6:45. All girls taking boxes are also requested to take two clothes pins, dressed as twin dolls. One of each pair will be sold at auction and supper partners found by matching dolls.


Hopbottom – The Christmas celebration of the Methodist church will this year be known as the White Gifts Services, following the ancient legend of White Gifts to The King. ALSO Christmas will be celebrated in the Universalist church on Saturday evening with a Christmas tree and by music and speaking by the children of the Sunday School. Christmas will also be celebrated on Sunday morning. Christmas is the greatest festival of the church.


West Bridgewater – While Mrs. Emma Bush and son, Marvin, were driving to church Sunday, their horse became frightened at a passing automobile, and tipped them over and demolished the cutter.


News Brief: Measles have made their appearance in the schools and no doubt will keep some children from having a very merry Christmas. In order to avert a general epidemic parents should co-operate with the teachers, and wherever there is a case in a family the rest of the children should be kept at home. When proper precautions are taken measles are not very dangerous. If children, however, are allowed to go out and get cold and wet, further complications—such as pneumonia, may result.


200 Years Ago from the Centinel, Montrose, Pa. Dec. 24, 1816.

*The last Sunday’s mail has not yet arrived, on account of the impracticability of crossing the [Susquehanna] river. So long as the mail carrier can excuse himself on account of ice in the river, so long he will neglect to bring the mail; and we may expect the last winter’s farce over again. The mail might pass on this side of the river on horseback if the carrier was disposed to bring it.


*The Centinel will hereafter be published on Saturday—to commence next week. This arrangement has become necessary in order to accommodate the people in the north part of the county, by mail, with papers. Persons living in Choconut township can have papers sent to Silver Lake Post Office, if requested; and those persons living in Silver Lake, at any place, on the post road, that they may choose.

*Silver Lake Bank. Notice is hereby given to the Stockholders of the Silver Lake Bank that an election for the purpose of electing thirteen Directors will be held at the house of Edward Fuller in Montrose, on Saturday the fourth day of January next at 1 o’clock P.M. David Post, Charles Fraser, Jonah Brewster, Isaac P. Foster, Putnam Catlin, Isaac Post, Austin Howell, Stockholders.

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