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May 19 1916

West Bridgewater – Someone entered our schoolhouse [most likely the Sprout schoolhouse] and roasted chicken and cooked eggs—as feathers and eggs were found on the floor around the stove. Better count your chickens, they were Plymouth Rocks. Seems a pity our schoolhouse can’t have a lock so the tramps can’t enter. First thing we know we won’t have a schoolhouse, as there is danger of their setting it on fire.


Dimock – Messrs. Percy Ballantine and Francis R. Cope have made known to the board of education that they jointly would like to erect a fully equipped High school building in Dimock, which should cost not less than ten thousand dollars, as a gift from them to the township. Only a few conditions were named in connection with the offer, one of which was that six of the township schools should be closed and the children from these districts brought to the Dimock township High school. A.J. Tingley has offered a lot as a site for the new school building.


Jackson – The 8th of May, 1916, being the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Pope, the relatives and friends decided to meet and extend to them their congratulations and best wishes. The couple were completely surprised by over 80 guests and relatives, but soon entered into the fun of the occasion. They were presented with some gold pieces, a gold thimble and a gold spoon. Mr. and Mrs. Pope have resided in Gibson township all their lives. He now conducts a successful furniture and undertaking business in this place. They have two daughters, Bertha Pope of Washington, D.C. and Grace Pope, at home. ALSO The North Jackson M. E. church is being painted two coats by the Tennant Bros., the well-known painters of Uniondale.


New Milford – “The Oldest Grave in Susquehanna County.” According to the New Milford Advertiser, the oldest [known] grave of an inhabitant of Susquehanna county is located in the New Milford cemetery. It is that of a child, a son of the first permanent settler in New Milford. The small dark slab of slate which marks the grave bears this inscription: “In memory of Warren Corbett, who died March 23, 1795, aged 7 years.” The grave is located at the top of the hill at the right of the first entrance to the old portion of the burial ground. The child’s father located his cabin on the site of what is known as the Phinney Hotel. In 1803 he sold his farm to Colonel Longstreet and moved to Corbettsville, NY. [Warren was most likely the son of Robert Corbett who lived, at that time, in what was known as Willingborough Township, Luzerne County and considered the first settler in that vicinity. He came from near Boston, through the agency of Mr. Cooper, of Cooperstown, New York. In 1801 he was taxed as an “innkeeper,” but left soon after with his sons for the mouth of Snake Creek—now Corbettsville. Willingborough, now Harmony, Oakland and Great Bend, did extend over the area of New Milford, established as a township in 1807. Susquehanna County was separated from Luzerne County in 1810.]


South Harford – The Book Club met with Mrs. Geo. McNamara and a good time was reported. Next meeting with Mrs. Frank Pickering, at South Gibson.


Fairdale – Mrs. Charles Strange and Mrs. H.B. Downer returned to Binghamton, yesterday, after spending a week at Fairdale. They accompanied their father, Robert Strange, aged over 90 years, to Fairdale on Sunday, where he will spend the summer at his old home with his daughter Mrs. George Olmstead. [Robert Strange, born in 1826, died 27 Feb. 1918, age 91 years, 9 months & 22 days. He is buried in the Fairdale Cemetery.]


Forest City – The following seated tracts of land (Lots) will be offered for sale on Monday, the 12th day of June, at the courthouse in Montrose: Mrs. John Melvin, Andrew Aull, Adolph Kessler, Mrs. B. Snyder, Mrs. John Clune, Laverne Dix.


Brooklyn – Herman Otto, after a tour of the middle west, during which time he had an opportunity of inspecting a large number of traction engines, has purchased a light tractor, which can be operated by one man and is very useful in plowing, hauling heavy loads, etc. The tractor is coming into use rapidly, even in the east, which has been slow to adopt it, and the improvement in the machine has had much to do with its adoption. The machine was purchased from Harrington & Wilson in Montrose.


Springville – Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Stevens had a very narrow escape from a serious accident on Saturday when their auto was struck by the train at McMicken’s crossing. They were enroute to Dimock to attend the funeral of their niece and not hearing the whistle of the south bound passenger train, attempted to make the crossing when the engine struck the car, demolishing the fender and taking off a front wheel. The occupants were not thrown from the car and were uninjured.


Great Bend – Memorial Day will be fittingly observed in Great Bend and Hallstead. The Daughters of Veterans have the matter in charge and the decorating of deceased veterans’ graves. Public services will be held in the Baptist Church at 10:30 a.m. and Hon. J.T. DuBois and Atty. W.A. Skinner, of Susquehanna, will deliver addresses.


Glenwood – Memorial Day in Glenwood, Annual Orders of Capt. Lyons Post, No. 85, G.A.R. The Commander of the Post requests all old veterans, sons of veterans and all patriotic citizens to meet with the veterans at Tower Church, May 30th, at 10 a.m., to do honor to our dead heroes and also requests the Sabbath School of the Tower church to furnish flowers to be strewn upon the soldiers’ graves. Theron Hinkley, Commander.


Susquehanna – Huyck & Demander offer monuments of every description. Pneumatic tools used for lettering and carving; in fact, the only up-to-date Monument Works in Susquehanna Co. Estimates cheerfully given. A postal card will bring a member of the firm to your door.


News Brief: Kill the first flies. One fly lays about 150 eggs. An egg becomes a grown fly in ten days. Twelve to 14 generations arrive in a season. The progeny of one fly has been estimated as millions in one season. Consequently the killing of one fly becomes an operation of considerable magnitude. All breeding places of flies should be done away with, such as open garbage cans and decaying material.


Two Hundred Years Ago, from the Montrose Centinel, May 22, 1816. Public Notice, Is hereby given that by order of the Orphans’ Court of Susquehanna County, will be exposed to sale by pubic vendue or out-cry, on the 26th day of August next, at 2 o’clock in the afternoon of that day, a certain Messuage and tract of land with the appurtenances, containing one hundred thirty-three acres, about eighty acres of which are under improvement, with a large dwelling house, barn and out houses, situate on the Milford and Owego Turnpike, and now in the tenure of Mary Miles. The Sale will be held on the premises and the terms made known by Mary Miles, Joshua Miles & Putnam Catlin, Esq. Administrators of the estate. By the Court. C. Frasier, Clk.

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