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April 14 1916

Auburn Four Corners/Montrose – Albert Hughes, of Auburn Four Corners, was found “guilty of murder in the second degree” for the shooting death of his wife, Lil. The sad tragedy took place last November. While the Commonwealth is trying to prove the deed was cold-blooded and premeditated, the defense asserts it was an accident. An emotional Hughes insisted that the shooting was an accident but some witnesses told of arguing and supposed abuse. The small children of the couple were in the room when the shooting took place. His eight year old daughter was called to the witness stand and as the little girl, pretty as a rose and as pure as a lily, with an innocent smile on her face, told of the incidents of the awful night, there were few dry eyes in the court room.


South New Milford – Many snow drifts all about here now and the roads are very bad—ruts over hub deep. Roads were so bad Sunday that there was no meeting. It takes two teams to haul a few cans over the pike.


South Gibson – The people of this place were sorry to hear of the serious illness of Mrs. James [Fuller] Hare. She was taken ill while in Africa and was advised to return to Philadelphia, where her brother, Byron Fuller, resides. Her many friends hope for her speedy recovery.


Montrose - A delightful Victrola concert was given in the store of W.C. Gamble, on Friday evening last. The audience enjoyed a treat not only of fine selections but chocolate bon-bons as well. Mr. Gamble is the Victrola representative in Montrose and vicinity. ALSO Saturday was the opening day at D.L. Robinove’s store and the very inclement weather, one of the most disagreeable of days to be out of doors, did not keep the crowds away. This fine store recently purchased by Mr. Robinove, and to which he had moved but a few days previous, made a most handsome appearance and delighted the visitors. Nearly 300 customers were recorded during the day and each one was presented with a fragrant carnation.


Lawsville – The school at Stanfordville was closed last Friday. The consolidation of the Lawsville and Stanfordville schools during the past term has proved a success, owing to the skillful and efficient management of Miss Mary Cosgriff, a teacher of considerable experience and ability.


Forest City – Harry Lumley who was born in this place and gained fame as an outfielder for a Brooklyn team and later played with the State League teams, is expected to take charge of the Johnstown team of the State League of professional baseball clubs. Lumley was a player with the Montrose team in his “bush league” days. ALSO Miss Louise Fullmer, of Swarthmore, Pa., representing the Chautauqua Association, has been in town for several days and has succeeded in securing the necessary number of guarantors to insure a three day Chautauqua here, to be held in September.


Ararat – Sixteen Forest City boys, whose ages ranged from 12 to 16 years, were arrested at this place on Saturday afternoon and taken to Carbondale where they were fined $17.50 each for train riding and trespass.


Harford – From all reports that we hear, it would seem that E.E. Jones will receive the Republican nomination for state senator by a handsome majority. In asking that this office be given to a Susquehanna county man, the Republicans of this county are only asking their due. And when they put forth a candidate of such acknowledged ability as Mr. Jones, with his record of achievement in the legislature during the past ten years, there can be no reasonable excuse why the voters in all three counties should not support him. ALSO Wilson Gow has moved in one of the Orphans’ school houses.


Bridgewater Twp. - Mr. and Mrs. Frank Stevens, of Giltedge, Montana, have been visiting at the home of their cousin, Jas. Webb. Mr. Stevens, who is now in his 84th year, formerly resided on the farm once owned by Isaac Harris, on the Snake Creek road, since then he followed the sea as a whaler for a time and for the past fourteen years he has been a successful cattleman and rancher in the far West.


Springville – Herbert Fish recently sold his wool, of which he had about twelve tons, to Baltimore parties. ALSO Nick Titman is having a bath room installed in his house and expects to furnish his home with electric lights from an engine in his cellar. ALSO R.L. Avery wishes to sell his house and lot and also household goods including two automobiles. They expect to move to Nichols, NY to engage in the mercantile business about the middle of May.


Middletown – Miss Julia Golden closed a very successful term of school here on Friday last.


Howard Hill, Liberty Twp. – We are again enjoying winter time, snow having fallen Saturday and Sunday to the depth of 8 inches.


Great Bend – About 3 ½ miles from this place, on the Binghamton road, is a short stretch of road which is causing a great deal of trouble. When the good roads were built, a strip each side of the Erie tracks was left a dirt road with the idea that when the Erie put in an over-head crossing, at this point, the road would be finished. Many a load of goods have been stuck there and had to be left over night before they could be got out. Wednesday night Earle Tingley had to leave a big load of goods all night and Tuesday, Newberry’s truck was stuck with a big load of goods and it was two days before they got out. Why such a piece of road should be left in such a condition no one seems to know.


News Brief: The average price of potatoes on the farms in Pennsylvania, on March 1st, was $1.09 a bushel compared with a price of 58 cents a bushel a year ago.


TWO HUNDRED YEARS AGO– “Bless be the tie that binds Their hearts in mutual love.” MARRIED, on the 14th inst. In the township of Springville, by Joshua W. Raynsford Esq. Mr. Samuel Sutton, Jr. to Miss Betsey Tuttle, both of that place. ALSO TURNPIKE ROADS. A bill passed the Legislature of this state at the last session appropriating 5000 dollars to aid in the completion of the Bidgewater and Wilkesbare Turnpike—and 1,500 dollars to the Clifford and Wilkesbarre Turnpike. A bill also passed granting 2000 dollars towards the erection of an academy at Montrose, Susquehanna county. ALSO List of letters remaining in the Post Office at Bridgewater: Elias Bennet, Hannah Brownson, John Bullock, Jonah Brewster & Erastus Catlin, Benjamin Blakesley & Henry Park, Stephen Bently, Zopher Blakesley, Ambrose Clark, Putnam Catlin or the Secretary of the Milford & Owego Turnpike, Calvin Davison, Michal Dow 2, Horris Dimock, Jeremiah Ethridge, Joseph Edmonds, Zenas Fuller, Erastus Farman, Jacob Hester, Samyel Hodgdon, John Heywood, Sidney A. Knowlton, Charles Lincoln, Daniel Lamson, Francis Purkins, Samuel Palmetor, John Robinson & James Cook, Nehemiah Scott, Salmon Thomas, Stephen Tracy, Leman Turrell, Joseph Williams, Cyrus Whipple, Betsey Wood, John Wright, Edmund B. West, Daniel Yeomans, George Young. ISAAC POST, P. M.

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