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January 22 1916

North Harford – There will be a shadow social at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Chamberlin, Jan. 24th, under the auspices of the M. E. church. Supper will be served and there will be a fish pond. No law against fishing in this pond and if you enjoy this sport, come out and see how many fish you can catch. Also see how your shadow looks. ALSO Bear tracks have been seen on Wolf Hill and in the swamp by different people. Men who have seen them before say that they are sure they are bear tracks. Better be careful how you wander after dark. But then, probably “Bruin” is miles away by this time.


Middletown – A number of our young people are enjoying the skating on Coleman’s flats these days. ALSO Our Telephone Co. met at Daniel Murphy’s, Wednesday night, and elected officers.


Rush – An old-time spelling match will be held at the M.E. Church on Jan. 29th. Music by the Rush orchestra. Refreshments will be served in the basement. Admission, including refreshments, 25 cents. Grand prize, $3; second prize, $1. ALSO A public sale will take place on the farm of Mrs. Russell Very, at Rush Centre, on Jan. 27th. At this sale two horses, four cows, one brood sow, thirty-five hens, wagons, sleighs, harnesses, mowing machine, hay and straw, stoves and milk cans, and many other articles will be sold to the highest bidder.


Montrose – The amount of sickness in and around Montrose at this time is really appalling. The grip seems to have whole communities in its talons, the drug stores being taxed to capacity to wait upon those who need medicines for coughs and colds. There are upward of a hundred pupils absent from the High school, ill. If you wish to ward off or relieve yourself of this troublesome malady, physicians claim that drinking large quantities of moderately cold water will aid in relieving the system of its impurities. To drink a quart of water each day is not too much.


Gelatt – Mrs. Verna Daniels was well pleased and appreciated the kindness of her friends and neighbors, last Thursday, when they met, cut, hauled and presented her with a nice pile of wood. She was very thankful to all those that helped in any way.


Clifford – Severe colds are numerous and our school, which numbers about thirty-five scholars, was reduced last week to twelve and fifteen on some days. Whooping cough was feared, but failed to materialize.


Hallstead – The Hallstead tent Daughters of Veterans will observe Washington’s birthday by giving a patriotic entertainment in Clune’s Opera House on the evening of Feb. 22nd.


Choconut Valley – The funeral of Mrs. M. J. Donley, who was brought from Scranton, was held at St. Joseph, Wednesday of last week. She was formerly a resident of this place and is survived by three sons, Cyrenus and Jerome of Choconut, John of New York City and one daughter, who resides at Scranton.


Brooklyn – H.F. Williams is selling a fine quality of coal at the S. & B. station here in Brooklyn, at 30 cents per hundred, the same as is asked at Hop Bottom. ALSO Boyd Austin has bought his father’s livery business and is now ready to serve the public by auto, sleigh and wagon livery.


Fair Hill, Forest Lake Twp. – We are having some old-fashioned winter weather for a few days. Regular zero weather. ALSO The Ladies’ Aid was well attended. The women sewed a nice lot of rag carpet for Mrs. M.J. Green and the men cut a nice lot of wood for the church.


Kingsley – An entertainment will be given in the Universalist church, Friday evening, Jan. 28. There will be readings, vocal and instrumental solos and conclude with a farce, entitled “Mrs. Bouncer’s Boarders” by local talent. Mrs. Van de Sand will sing, Mr. Bruce Frink will give violin solos and Miss Louise Stearns will preside at the piano. Adm. 25 and 15 cents.


Alford – Next week men will commence to tear down the old wooden trestle, across the mill pond, over which the L.&M. railroad has passed since the branch was laid in 1891. ALSO Evangelist A. Lee Aldrich, a former Alford young man, is conducting one of the biggest revivals ever held in the west at St. Paul and Minneapolis. Hundreds of people have been turned away from the crowded tabernacle. The young evangelist preached at East Bridgewater church one Sunday not long since.


New Milford – E.N. Townsend has taken his blacksmith shop back from John Samson. ALSO Mr. Lewis, of Great Bend, is moving in town, having bought a blacksmith shop of A.L. Harris.


West Lenox – Several from this place attended license court at Montrose last week. Some of them were very important witnesses against both hotels at Hopbottom. A thorough canvass of the town was made with a remonstrance against both hotels and much interest was shown.


Susquehanna – Susquehanna police want saloons made to comply with law. The following petition was presented to the Council of the Borough of Susquehanna: Whereas, Certain holders of retail liquor licenses in this borough consistently refuse to close their bars at midnight on secular days, refuse to expose the interior thereof on Sundays so that the passerby may ascertain whether the liquor laws of the State are, or are not, violated therein on Sunday, and who persist in throwing wide open the doors of their bar rooms at midnight on Sundays; and Whereas, All of these irregularities are at variance with the fair public sentiment of the community, as well as opposed to expressed will of the Court of their county, who declared as we are informed, at the last license term of court, that he would not tolerate the opening of any bar room at midnight Sunday and that all bars should be so exposed on Sundays, so as to permit the passerby to discover whether or not the law was being violated therein and that if the holders of liquor licenses wished to co-operate with the will of the Court, they would close their bars promptly at midnight on all secular days; now, therefore, In consideration of the above recited irregularities and in deference to the fair minded public sentiment of the community, we respectfully request your honorable body to take some action, with a view of calling the attention of the Court to the same and requesting the adoption of a rule or rules that will prevent a repetition of these irregularities in the future. Signed by T. J. McMahon, Chief of Police; W. H. Smethurst, Police Officer and Constables John Marshall, T. H. Moran, Frank Howard. It was moved by Council member Ryan and seconded by Main, that the petition be received and that the council direct its solicitor to take up the matter therein complained of and represent to the Court, that it is the will of the council of the Borough of Susquehanna Depot, that the irregularities complained of be remedied in so far as the same may be legally.


News Briefs: The great trouble with fellows with one idea is that they usually have the wrong idea. ALSO Marriage licenses taken: T.J. O’Donnell, Brooklyn, NY and Margaret Coleman, Middletown, NY; Charles C. Corwin, Hallstead and Marian T. Warner, Montrose; Harry Light, Rush and Mae H. Diehl, Altoona; James B. Guiton, Middletown and Winifred Cavanaugh, Rush; Michael J. McNerney, Forest Lake and Frances G. Lynch, Friendsville; Simon E. Marcey, Lenox and Mabel J. Ruland, Lenox.

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