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May 08 1914

Forest City – You have heard the story of Finnigan, the conductor, who having sent in a long account of a wreck was told by the superintendent to shorten his reports and the next time a train left the track [he] wired headquarters, “Off again, on again, gone again. Finnigan.” Some time ago Julius Freedman contracted to purchase the Osgood lot on Main street. Before he got a good warrantee title it got into the hands of the sheriff, was sold at sheriff’s sale and purchased by J.A. Hoole, the Carbondale contractor and Mr. Freedman was out in the cold. Little things like that do not stop Julius, however, and yesterday he closed a deal with Mr. Hoole and is again in possession of the property one of the town’s choicest building sites. Depend on “pop” to land on his feet.


Montrose – Prof. H.P. Young’s class in agriculture in the High school visited the blacksmith shop of Dr. C.W. Brodhead, where Dr. Brodhead gave the class a couple of hours’ demonstration of practical horseshoeing, welding iron and like matters of a practical nature in connection with farm work. The class in agriculture is doing well under the instruction of Prof. Young, who is giving a course that particularly adapts young men to the practice of modern and progressive methods of farming. ALSO The ladies of the A.M.E. Zion church will serve a “Feast of the Seven Tables” in the basement of the church on May 19th. Supper 25 cents. All are invited to help the pastor and his people.


Uniondale - Our street commissioner, Ira Churchill, has a force of men out repairing streets and making ready with the expectation that our good neighbors of Clifford township [will] loan us their up to date traction engine to put on the finishing touches. Ira is a hustler and we have confidence in him. Thanks to O.T. Rounds in helping us to secure the outfit to repair the streets. ALSO Grant Stevens has purchased, of J.N. Corey, the famous horse, Billy S.C. Glad he has fallen into kind hands. Mr. Corey purchased a nice Ford car of Douglas & Yale last season—the only reason for his parting with him.


Little Meadows – The dance that was held in the Hall here, Friday evening, was largely attended. The proceeds were $50. ALSO Edward Butler made a flying trip to Endicott, N. Y. last week. He reported the roads quite muddy.


Lynn, Springville Twp. - The Lynn base ball team has received their new uniforms, which present a very neat appearance. ALSO A band of Gypsies passed through this place, Friday last, on route to Montrose.


Choconut – The house of John Dean was destroyed by fire Monday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Dean were away attending the funeral of a relative. One son, who was home, was in the barn at work, did not discover the fire until it was too late to save anything.


Harford – Friday evening, April 24, a merry company of friends and neighbors, about 40 in number, gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Flint to help celebrate his birthday. Mr. Flint served in the Civil War, enlisting in Co. H. of the 50th N. Y. volunteers. After the war he came to Harford and joined the Harvey S. Rice Post, when organized, and is one of the very few members who are still living and his many friends were glad to do honor to his 70th birthday. Music and games helped the time to pass, Mr. Flint being as lively as anyone and helping all to have a good time. E.C. Harding, another of our venerable soldiers, presented Mr. Flint with a purse of money as a token of good will and esteem, to which Mr. Flint very feelingly responded, after which the company departed to their various homes, wishing him many happy returns of the day and feeling that a very pleasant evening had been spent with one of our few remaining old soldiers, and sad that soon only a memory of their noble deeds will be all we shall have to revere.


Gelatt – Harold Daniels is rejoicing over a pair of twin goats. ALSO: The teachers’ training class passed their final examination and will graduate in the near future. The class consists of the following: Verna Daniels, Abbie Thomas, Marion Lowe, Ruth Gelatt and Ruth Holmes.


Susquehanna – Rev. Fr. Harry A. Mooney, of Buffalo, has been visiting at the home of his mother, Mrs. Mary Mooney.


New Milford – Charles Kenyon died at his home in New Milford, April 4, after a long illness, aged 74 years. He was one of New Milford’s best known and most highly respected citizens. He enlisted in Co. H, Fourth Pennsylvania Reserves, being one of the last men of that company to be discharged. This regiment was part of the Army of the Potomac, and saw much hard service, being engaged in 38 battles, among which are Mechanicsburg, Gains Mill, Charles City Cross Roads—where 32 % were lost—Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. These were fought in ’62. They did no fighting in ’63, but in ’64 they endured some severe hardships of the war. Of the 100 men of this company that went forth at the country’s call, only five are now living; M. H. VanScoten and James P. Gay of Montrose; Elvin S. Gay, of Ohio; Abel P. Sweet, of Harford [passed away May 7, notice next week] and John Anderson, in the West [Nebraska].


Clifford – Pastor German, of the Methodist church, preached a very instructive sermon on the subject “Sleepy Christians.”


Brooklyn – Dana Brink, a prosperous farmer living near Lindaville, dropped dead while plowing on Friday. The horses, attached to the plow, remained motionless after their master had expired. The body was discovered by Mr. Brink’s son who noticed that the team had been standing for some time.


Great Bend – Henry Ackert’s store was entered Saturday night and a large quantity of cigars, tobacco, a ham and two pies taken. The goods were worth about $25. Local talent is suspected.


Brookdale - A large band of gypsies have been camping on the old school grounds near the State line, and were quite an attraction. They were also reported to be encamped near the lake, in Montrose, for several days this week. Outside of horse-trading and fortune-telling, they cut no great figure while here.


Fair Hill, Jessup Twp. – Martin Smith is busy buying eggs. He makes a shipment once a week, pays the market price, and calls and gets them.


Silver Lake – Mrs. Donovan has gone to Binghamton to reside. On Tuesday evening Misses Kathryn Murphy and Kathryn Donovan, of that city, gave a housewarming in her honor. About 35 guests were present.

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