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December 03 1909

Rush - The race between Benjamin Anderson's and George Gray's oxen took place one day this week. Anderson won. ALSO Wm. Devine, a glove cutter in Binghamton, is a guest of his parents here.


Fowler Hill - Harry Hogeboom had a narrow escape from what might have been a serious accident Saturday morning. The horse he was driving stumbled and threw him out of the wagon, leaving him to catch up if he could, and he did.


Lindaville, Brooklyn Twp. - The blizzard of last Wednesday and Thursday reached the limit for November.


Montrose - The crisp wintry weather results in a desire to keep indoors in the evening and as a result the library reading rooms show an increase in nightly visitors. In the well lighted, comfortable quarters, with the crackle of the wood fire in the fireplace, and all around the literary atmosphere that breathes of quiet and refinement, the bookworm finds a bit of earthly paradise. And, four new traveling libraries have been sent out, going to Kingsley, Little Meadows, Birchardville and Lynn.


Fairdale - Imon Very has hung out his shingle as auctioneer.


Susquehanna - Messrs J.M. Tinkler and H.G. Pride were in Montrose during the week, attending court. Both gentlemen are members of the "art preservative" craft, employed in the Erie printing office located in our hillside town. Like all good printers who have received their education in the University of Adversity, with the printing office as a post-graduate course, they are men of uncommon sense with a genial affability which wins them friends everywhere.


Springville - John Cokely has "shook the town," announcing his intention of going to California, but it looks good to see Jerry Cokely on the street again after the stroke of paralysis he suffered about three weeks ago. ALSO Alfred Grow, instead of taking his trip to California as reported, changed his mind and took him a wife. He was married to Mrs. Sarah C. Linaberry, of Auburn 4 Corners, at Binghamton, Nov. 24, 1909, by Rev. Sweet. They arrived at Montrose Friday, Nov. 25, on the afternoon train. In spite of snow banks and bad roads they continued their wedding trip over the hills in an automobile, amid showers of rice and well decorated with flags and old shoes, under the power of the famous Ford, to her daughter's, Mrs. C.E. Roberts


East Kingsley - For the past few weeks Melvin Tingley has been suffering from a very severe attack of sciatica rheumatism, being unable to walk without the aid of crutches. On Tuesday, Nov. 23, his many friends and neighbors gathered at his home and made him a wood bee. A good supply of winter wood was cut and through the columns of this paper Mr. Tingley wishes to thank all who were so kind to help him, for cold weather is coming and how good a big woodpile looks.


Uniondale - Thanksgiving was celebrated in the usual way here. Some had turkey, some chicken, some spare ribs and some had to be satisfied with a piece of an old cow.


Thompson - Eight inches of snow fell the night before Thanksgiving, and the sleigh bells have jingled merrily since then, but the warm weather has called a halt to their music.


Dundaff - Mrs. Ada White accepted the position of housekeeper at Hotel Rivernburg.


Hallstead - Freeman Slater, a young man of 18 or 19 years, was placed in jail Sunday night charged with having kidnapped Ella Ellis, a 13-year old Hallstead girl, while she was returning from school. For four days, according to the girl's story, young Slater held her a prisoner in Smoky Hollow, a neighborhood of unsavory reputation a short distance east of Hallstead, and she was rescued by Constable Decker and her stepfather, Andrew Colwell, on Saturday night. The girl is rather large for her age and of attractive appearance and she claims that Slater met her on the road home and forced her to accompany him to "old" Galloway's house, where he detained her two days. She was then taken to the home of Scott Melody where she was found Saturday night by the searchers. The parents conferred with Justice J.F. Carl, informing him of attentions Slater had been paying Ella. Searchers found that Slater's house was quarantined on account of diphtheria and his whereabouts were said to be unknown, until he was found at the Melody home which resulted in the discovery of the whereabouts of both. Justice Carl sent Slater to jail in Montrose to await the action of the grand jury in January. The girl is at her home.


Forest City - Mrs. Della E. LeRoy has opened a Baby's Bazaar and Ladies Furnishing store in the Bloxham building opposite the Methodist church. This is a line for which there would seem to be an opening in town and it is probable that Mrs. LeRoy's venture will meet with success.


East Bridgewater - J.F. Gardner was among the Democrat's welcome callers Tuesday. He reports that the recent snow storm cut up capers with a lot of the roads, there being drifts between Tiffany and Montrose, six or eight feet high, blocking the roads entirely for a day or so.


St. Joseph - Mrs. Patrick O'Reilly has purchased the store of Mrs. Hickey at St. Joseph and with her son, Michael, will conduct the same in the future. Mrs. Hickey and her daughter, Miss Catherine, went to Scranton to reside.


Elk Lake - Mrs. Miranda O. Stevens, widow of Philander S. Stevens, died at her home in Elk Lake, Thursday night, Nov. 25, at about 11 o'clock. She had been in failing health for some time and her death was anticipated for some weeks. Her age was 79 years. Mrs. Stevens had resided in Elk Lake nearly all her life and was a woman widely known for her lovable nature and kindly disposition. She was a sister of Mrs. Eliza Smith, of Montrose, who with a granddaughter, Mrs. H.F. Brewster, of this place, alone survive. A son, Frank Stevens, resided in Montrose for years, his death occurring about 25 years ago. She was a member of St. Paul's church of Montrose. Interment in the Elk Lake cemetery.

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