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June 26, 1908

Grover Cleveland Dead at Princeton, Former President, Thought To Be Improving, Passes Suddenly Away. The following statement, signed by Dr. Joseph D. Bryant, Dr. George R. Lockwood and Dr. J.M. Carnochan, was immediately given out: "Mr. Cleveland for many years had suffered from repeated attacks of gastro-intestinal origin. Also he had long standing organic disease of the heart and kidneys. Heart failure, complicated with pulmonary thrombosis and edema, was the immediate cause of his death." Mr. Cleveland was 71 years old on March 18 last. The scene in the bedroom immediately before and after the death of the distinguished patient cannot here be recorded, as the three physicians refuse to refer to the subject. As soon as the widow could recover herself she summoned a servant and asked that Professor Andrew F. West, of Princeton University, a close intimate friend and neighbor, and Professor John D. Hibbin, also of Princeton and a neighbor, be sent for. Telegrams were prepared to the children and about a dozen other relatives who are scattered all over the country. Up to this time no one outside the Cleveland, West and Hibben families knew of what had occurred. The funeral, which will be strictly private, will be held on Friday afternoon and the interment will be in Princeton Cemetery.


Montrose - A number of Montrose's young men look like "round-headed Puritans, having had the hair cropped close for relief during the warm weather.


Shannon Hill, Auburn Twp. - This neighborhood had two unpleasant surprises last week. The first was last Friday morning at 4 o'clock, when the patrons of the creamery were notified by telephone that the creamery had burned to the ground. No one knows how the fire started as there was no fire in the engine during the night, and no one knew it had burned until the manager, Clarence Overfield, went to his work in the morning. The second surprise came Sunday morning, when Mrs. Harriet Mowry's house was discovered to be on fire. It was occupied by Mrs. Mowry and her tenant, Frank Northrup. The fire started in the chimney, and as there was not much help at hand, it soon got beyond control and burned to the ground. The most of Mr. Mowry's goods were saved, but Mr. Northrup lost a good many things. There was some insurance. The family is living in Will Dougherty's tenant house.


Rush - The Ladies' Aid of the Baptist church will hold an ice cream social on U.C. Millard's lawn the afternoon and evening of July 4. The funds raised will be used to purchase gasoline lights for the church. The school board has engaged J. Riggs Brewster, Of Marsovan, Turkey [and Montrose] as principal of the Rush High School. Anna McGovern will teach the intermediate and Mary Hickok the primary room.


Hallstead - Hon. S.B. Chase has served as an elder in the Presbyterian church in that place for 50 years. Of the present membership of the church, all but three out of a total of 627, have been received since Mr. Chase first became an elder. It is a notable record and was appropriately observed on the anniversary by the congregation.


South Gibson - Mrs. Philura Powers celebrated her 93d birthday last week and has gone to Kentuck [Gibson Twp.] to visit old neighbors. AND Blacksnakes have been quite numerous during the dry weather. J.E. Gardner shot one in a tree close to the house. They keep the windows closed now. It is supposed the snakes come from the ledges after water.


Lynn, Springville Twp. - We are having four mails daily now, which doubles the duty of our mail carrier, George H. Sheldon. AND Webster Fish has the finest young team of matched horses in the county. They are light bays and look as near alike as two peas in a pod.


Middletown Centre - The LeRaysville ball club crossed bats with the Middletown Center boys Friday, the score being 2 to 5 in favor of the Center. AND in Flynn, the bridge club was very pleasantly entertained by Miss Mame Grace, Sunday evening.


Harford - Harford's new stone crusher is doing a lively business. It is located on the lands of Frank Forsyth, using the stone walls and stone rows to good advantage. Seventeen rods of road was filled the first day.


Flowery Valley, Liberty Twp. - We have our telephone line finished, and it extends as far as J.B. Mahoney's. We are all enjoying it very much. AND in West Liberty: Hark! From the sounds we hear, Camp Susquehannock, at Tripp Lake, is alive again.


Brooklyn - The town of Brooklyn seems to have the monopoly of the mad dogs of the County. A few weeks ago Luther Ely shot a dog infested with Hydrophobia, after it had bitten many dogs in the town and it is reported, two head of cattle also. A strange dog, which clearly was mad, was known to be in town Tuesday night, and a search was made for it, and it was found early Wednesday morning by James Whalen and shot. It frothed at the mouth and snapped at everything that it came near. It is not known for certain but it is thought that it might have been bitten by the dog which was shot a few weeks ago. Every dog should be muzzled at this time of year.


Clifford - A jolly crowd of from 10 to 15 couples passed through town Sunday on their way to Royal, where they all partook of one of Charley's chicken suppers, he knows so well how to provide. They were a lively set and made Royal a lively town while they were there. AND B.F. Wells and wife, formerly our old undertaker, but of late years a resident of Sea Breeze, Florida, are now visiting their old town. It looks good to see them on our streets once more.


Uniondale - Carpenters are at work on the fair grounds, replacing the old grand stand and stables with others more spacious and convenient, preparatory to celebrating the 4th of July. A full program and an enjoyable time is expected.


New Milford - DeWitt C. Vail, son of Mr. and Mrs. C.S. Vail, of this place, who enlisted in the United States navy some months ago, since then being stationed at Newport, RI, started on Monday on the U.S. Prairie in company with a squad of 400 men, for the Panama Canal zone, crossing he isthmus by rail, they will sail by steamer for San Francisco.

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