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April 12 1907

Friendsville - Considerable mystery surrounds the death of Mrs. E.L. Handrick, wife of Dr. Handrick, on Wednesday last. On Wednesday morning Dr. Handrick left home to attend a patient and on his return in the afternoon his wife was missing. Thinking that she had stepped out to a neighbor's, he put his horse in the barn. She failed to return, however, and a search was started, which finally resulted in the discovery of her body in an unused well at the rear of the house. The well is only about 11 ft. deep and the body was in a sitting position with the water up to the woman's neck. How the affair took place cannot be accounted for and all suggestion of suicide are discredited by Dr. Handrick, as the woman's life had been devoid of unpleasant incidents. In the morning she was seen by neighbors going to a brush pile at the rear of the house to throw away a pan of garbage and she was seen returning in the direction of the house. Whether she gained the house or fell into the well at that time cannot be discovered. When found life had been extinct for some time and it is thought that the shock from the fall caused it, as there was not enough water in the well to drown her. She was the daughter of the late Dr. Leet, one of the first settlers of Friendsville, and sister of the late Dr. N.Y. Leet, of Scranton.


Uniondale - Last week a team of horses drawing wood broke through the ice and one horse settled so far that they took the other one to pull it out, then the wagon was in so far that they had to hitch to the end of the tongue to get that out.


Shannon Hill, Auburn Twp. - Wednesday, March 27, the Ladies Aid Society met in the basement of the church and tied a nice quilt, which was presented to Libbie Cole and the members of the society to Mrs. Will Swisher, of West Auburn, who lost all of her household goods by fire. The ladies also donated to her a nice lot of clothes, muslin, gingham, canned fruit and carpet rags. Mrs. Swisher resided in this place several years ago and she wishes to thank her friends for their kind remembrance to her in her time of affliction. Dinner was served and the school children and teacher were invited and were served at one table. A very nice time was had by all. Receipts $6.00.


Ararat - Mrs. Elbertun Leach and family have moved to Carbondale, but the miserable saloon business goes on just the same. She is succeeded by Chas. Walker, who seems anxious to keep up the reputation of the place. The devil always finds some one to carry up his satanic business, but we sorrow to think that a place like this, that is feeding on the life and souls of our young men, has the protection of our glorious government, and is licensed to rob our homes. The whole nation is wondering where the little Marvin lad is, and is mourning in sympathy with that bereaved father, but what of the boys that are being daily lost--lost to parents, lost to manhood, --just through this legal channel and there is no fuss made about it. Is this "the land of the free" that we talk so much about? God help us.


Fair Hill, Jessup Twp. - The Ladies Aid will meet at the church Thursday to remodel the cushions and enjoy a basket lunch, the gentlemen cutting wood that has been given for the church.


New Milford - The Jay House is now owned by H.G. Stratton, who is conducting the business with great success. Mr. Stratton is a genial and popular hotel man, having worked at the business a number of years, and his hotel equipments, table board, etc., cannot be excelled in any hotel in Susquehanna County.


Forest City - A.L. Morgan, one of the oldest residents here, is moving his family to Binghamton.


Hop Bottom - Pupils having the best record for attendance during the last month of school are: Floyd Titus, Maurice Packer, Clarence Phillips, Ermon Palmer, Claude Phillips, Paul Hettes, Thursey Palmer, Edna Wright, Belle Hine, Alice Aldrich, Myrtle Titus, Emma Patterson, Mildred Patterson, M. Meeker, Bulah Hine, Maude Reynolds and Marion Kerr.


Flynn, Middletown Twp. - People should be on their guard for Sunday night walkers, or eve droppers, or have the blinds down. AND In Middletown Twp. the hens are working overtime this spring. For the first week in April our hustling merchant, M.M. Curley, took in an average of 250 dozen per day.


Great Bend - The second annual ball of the American Chair Mfg., Co.2, Employees' Aid Association, will be held on Friday evening in Clune's Opera House. Music by Conner's popular orchestra. A buffet lunch will be served on the stage. April 12 is the date.


Harford - W.L. Thatcher is busy preparing his history for the 50th anniversary of the Harford Fair. A big time is expected. Don't you forget it!


Montrose - H.E. Cooley, local representative for the Pope-Hartford automobile, has recently sold two large 22-horsepower touring cars, one going to Maryland and the other to a gentleman at Mount Pocono. Both were handsome, finely constructed machines. This year there has been an unprecedented demand for cars, and the various manufacturers find it impossible to supply the trade. Many farmers are placing orders for autos, and the prejudice against them in the country is gradually being overcome. A number a local people are considering purchasing machines this summer.


Susquehanna - The Susquehanna bowlers defeated the Lackawanna club of Binghamton Tuesday evening, at Edwards' parlors. The home players are playing in fine form, and if they continue, have a good chance to win first place in the league.


Dimock - Luman Thornton will soon fill his new store with a fine lot of goods.


News Briefs: The feather duster must go. It is charged with spreading the germs of tuberculosis. And the latest idea brings moistened scraps of newspaper spread up on the floor when the floor is swept, as an arrester of the spread of dust. It has the same effect as snow scattered over the floor, except that it is not liable to melt and is therefore cleaner. AND The pansies which attracted our attention Sunday morning were buried in snow on Monday morning. Crocuses shared the same fate.

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