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January 04 1907

Great Bend - We are authorized to say that if the party who took Postmaster Simrell's underclothes from the line Monday night, will return the same at the same time they return William Knoeller's bicycle, Charles Knoeller's washing, and George Lamb's and Charles VanZant's porch chairs, it will be all right. With the exception of Mr. Simrell, the above named parties advertised that the one who purloined the mentioned articles was known. Mr. Simrell says he has not yet made the thief's acquaintance, but he would like to meet him and thereby have as extensive an acquaintance as the other sufferers.


Forest City - Between the noises of exploding powder, the tooting of whistles and the commotion in the streets among those who celebrated the advent of the new year, Forest City people didn't enjoy peaceful sleep Monday night. It's all right, perhaps, but someone has a numerous and diversified list of cuss words to answer for.


Dimock - While engaged in work on the large barn being erected on the Cope farm at Dimock last Saturday, Werdon H. Allen sustained painful, and at the time it was feared, serious injuries. With his brother, Claude, assisting him in throwing a plank to the ground, he overbalanced in the act and was unable to save himself from falling. He is now recovering at the home of his father in law, Commissioner O.A. Tiffany, and will probably be out in a few weeks.


South New Milford - Mrs. B.F. Burdick received the sad news that her half brother in law, in North Dakota, was covered by a fall of coal 70 miles out on the frontier and was killed.


Montrose - The mercury on Monday, Jan. 7th, registered 60 degrees in the shade. To you who have just started new diaries for 1907 it might be worth mentioning the fact. Usually we are burrowing in snowdrifts about this time. AND In carting barrels or boxes of swill, or any other refuse through the streets, be careful in doing so, and drive slowly. To spread dirt of this kind carelessly is a violation of the law of good citizenship, and if complaint is entered to the council against the offending parties, they will learn a right smart and timely lesson on the proper observance of sanitary rules.


Lanesboro - Burglars entered the store of Buckley Bros. on Friday night, by boring a number of holes in the door and removing a panel. Little booty was secured, only 45 cents being found in the money drawer and a number of boxes of cigars taken. The tools by which entrance was affected to the store were taken from J.A. Taylor's blacksmith shop, they breaking into that building and appropriating the desired articles. They got away unapprehended, the first intimation of the robbery being the finding of the money drawer broken open the following morning upon the arrival of a clerk.


Susquehanna - Chicken thieves and hold-up gangs are pretty numerous around this section at present. If Susquehanna Borough can get what is their due from the Erie $10,000 tax, more officers could be employed to look after the people's interests. No other section of the county gets the travel that does Susquehanna, and everything drops off here from the main line and it would take several officers to keep suspicious characters under their eyes. We need the money, and we need the officers, and the question is, "will we get either?"


Uniondale - The ice last week rendered the roads almost impassable [and] some of the drivers said that in going down steep hills the wagon would nearly get ahead of the horses. Now the roads are muddy and in many places are broken up.


Friendsville - Francis Keenan has gone to Hoboken, where he has accepted a position. AND A beautiful statue, of exquisite workmanship, has been lately donated to the Catholic church. The statue represents St. Francis Xavier, the pattern [patron] of the church, and was a gift of Miss Mary Hickey, of Scranton, formerly of this place.


Brooklyn - The friends of Roy Shadduck entertain grave fears for his safety, as he is employed in Sonora, Mexico, and has charge of the company's store for the Cananea Yaqua River and Pacific Railway. Details of the Indian massacre on the line of that road were read in the Binghamton Press, of Thursday and Saturday, Dec. 27 and 29. Young Shadduck has many friends in New Milford and throughout the county, who will wait with much anxiety to hear from him.


Beech Grove, Auburn Twp. - The little run of fine sleighing which was ours has given place to a fine lot of mud; as ever, we get the bitter with the sweet, which teaches us to appreciate our blessings. AND In Retta, we are glad to notice a light in the window of J.G. Sterling's these long, lonesome nights.


Harford - Norman Adams has bought a set of blacksmith tools and will work at his trade with his farm work the coming season.


News Briefs - How many of our readers can tell us what the stripes on the barber pole signify? You see the pole with the stripes and you know there is a barber shop back of the pole, but here the knowledge of the average person ceases. In the early days barbers did the bleeding for the community and surgeons were not as plentiful as now. The first thing thought necessary way down to the time of George Washington's death, was that every patient should be bled. Well, the red stripes on a barber pole mean the red ribbon bandages that barbers bound over the wounds caused by bleeding people. That's all. When they got through with a plethoric man, of full habit, and had tapped him like a hard maple tree in February, he was patched up and bandaged till his arms, legs, and trunks looked like a much-gartered leg. AND Borden's Condensed Milk company is just 50 years old, and their business continues to grow with each year, so that today all over the country and throughout the civilized world they are regarded as the largest manufacturers of milk products and "Leaders of Quality." AND Vigorous condemnation of home euchre clubs and progressive euchre parties as demoralizing and paving the way for the young people to become gamblers, has been uttered by the City Epworth League of Scranton.

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