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February 19 1904

Montrose - Zion A.M.E. Church was crowded last Sunday evening by friends who listened with interest and marked appreciation to the Sacred Concert given under the auspices of the choir, with Mrs. Ella Chappel as manager. The exercises began at 8 o'clock, the pastor, Rev. J. E. Williams reading an appropriate Scripture Lesson. The choir then sang "Rock of Ages," followed by a fine bass solo by Chester Arthur Reed. Ella Slaughter read a Psalm and two little girls, Mazie Lewis and Georgia Reed, sweetly rendered "Vale of Beulah." Henry Naylor, in his usual pleasing manner, gave a solo and Miss Rosa Smith, rendered most credit to "Cavalry." Mrs. Chapple's solo also elicited many compliments. Quarterly Meeting will be held in the church next Sunday. The order of services is as follows: Love Feast and sermon in the morning and in the afternoon Rev. Frank W. Young, pastor of the M. E. Church, is expecting to preach. In the evening Presiding Elder Ross will administer Holy Communion and preach. There will be special music. AND Samuel A. Pettis celebrated his 93d birthday on Monday. On that day he walked from his home on Depot street down town and back as is his custom every few days. Mr. Pettis stands almost erect and walks as spry as many a man of 60 years.


Gibson - The Crossley brothers, of New Milford, have recently added to their plant near Gibson, machinery for the cutting from large maple timber, roller blocks used in calico printing. They also have a plant at Starrucca, Wayne County. The output is exported to Scotland and Germany. These two mills are about the only ones of the kind in the United States.


Jackson - Hon. John Wesley Cargill died at his home in Jackson township, Monday morning. The funeral services were conducted from his late home on Thursday at 11 o'clock. He was born in Jackson township May 25, 1831, of colonial ancestry; he was a life-long Democrat, the only departure from his extreme political faith being his advocacy of the election and policy of the lamented President McKinley; he served Susquehanna county in the legislature one term and was a man of more than ordinary ability; he is survived by a wife and other relatives, his only child, a son, Prof. Manlius W. Cargill, having died some two years ago.


New Milford - All work will be completed at the tannery this week and then the institution will be closed down. Just how long the plant will lay idle seems at this time to be a mere matter of conjecture, but we have hopes, and very good reason for believing that it will not be for long, as Mr. Safford, the owner of the plant, has parties interested in the matter.


Susquehanna - It is said that the Erie will hire no more women stenographers. AND Hatch's Moving Pictures appeared in Hogan Opera house, on Tuesday evening, under the auspices of grace Episcopal church, Oakland. AND The Susquehanna Hospital association will, in the spring, erect a two-story brick hospital building near Laurel Hill. It will be modern in every respect.


Auburn - Feb. 6, while sleigh-riding, Miss Lena Bushnell had the misfortune to hurt one of her eyes by being hit with a brake handle, and was unable to teach last week. Her eye was almost swollen shut almost instantly. She is getting along nicely but still has a black eye. Jessie Bushnell took her place for a few days.


Thompson Twp. - Mrs. Eliza Clapper, wife of John W. Clapper, died Feb. 2, after a short illness from pneumonia. Mrs. Clapper was a daughter of Aaron and Mary Aldrich, of New Hampshire. She was born in 1833 and when a child came to Thompson with her parents. She married Mr. Clapper in 1853 and they went to live on the farm that has ever since been their home. During the dark days of the civil war Mr. Clapper enlisted in Co. A, 137th New York Volunteer Infantry and remained in the service until hostilities ceased, and during this time Mrs. Clapper cared for five little children and managed the affairs at home in such a way as to give her great credit. She is survived by her husband, one brother, Aldrich, of New Milford; eight children, Alvina, wife of George Curtis, of Herrick; Emma, wife of Hezekiah Robbins, of Harford; Charles, who lives on the old homestead; Eudora, wife of Harney Brown, of Thompson Twp.; Julia, wife of Lewis Banks, of Susquehanna; Alice, wife of Vernon Slocum, of Jackson; Lena, wife of Myron Avery, of Susquehanna; and Adalaide, wife of Jerry Robbins, of Harford and several grand-children and great-grand-children.


Heart Lake - Mulford Gay is the champion egg producer of this section. From less than 100 hens he has sold for the month of December about $30 worth of eggs; and for January about $40 worth; who can beat it?


Harford - The Harford grangers have purchased one of the vacated Soldiers' Orphan school buildings for a grange hall, consideration $500.


Springville - There will be an oyster supper and entertainment in the M. E. church, Thursday evening, Feb. 25. A very interesting program is being arranged. One of the specially interesting features of the evening will be a "Tom Thumb" wedding. AND A. D. Shoemaker, having sold his farm to Frank Dodge, will go to Kansas soon. His family will remain for the present.


Fairdale - The Sheen brothers and sister will give an entertainment in the M. E. church at Fairdale on the evening of Feb. 22, Washington's birthday. A lady will also read a paper on "Travels in the Holy Land." Very interesting. Tickets 15 cents; children 10 cents. Receipts to apply on the minister's salary.


Hallstead - For several weeks the Lackawanna has been doing a greatly increased volume of business in Hallstead. Many Utica trains are being sent from this point and a number of engineers and crews have been sent from Scranton to Hallstead. At present there are six extra engines and engineers and firemen in service, and also four train crews. These men having all been sent from Scranton. Heavy shipments of coal are being made to Utica and Syracuse and the resulting is unprecedented. It is a great boom in railroading and to railroad men.


Birchardville - Anyone wanting to buy a swell body cutter or a hand made buggy, call on F. S. Ball.


Ararat - The following were elected on Tuesday last: Assessor, Titus Shaver; J. of P., V. O. Stearns; Sup. A. L. Bowell; and R. F. Stone; school direc., G. W. Gelatt, R. J. Avery; town clerk, O. F. Potter; town treas., J. N. Sartelle; poor master, C. P. Rose; judge of elec., G. F. Barnes; ins., W. Burman. In Herrick the following were elected: Assessor, Ashford B. Tingley; sup., Austin Smith and E. I. Baker; school direc., William Todd, William Pickering; judge of elec. S. O. Churchill; ins., Alexander J. Scott; town clerk, R. M. Tingley; town treas., F. D. Fletcher; poor master, Geo. H. Reynolds.

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