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November 06 1903

Friendsville - On Monday, Patrick Bahan, of Friendsville, drove in with some calves, which he disposed of at Hibbard's stock yards near the L & M station. After transacting the business in connection with the deal and attending to some other matters, he, in company with a friend, started homeward. As they near Thomas Houghton's farm in the township, Mr. Bahan's companion had occasion to leap from the wagon, which had in some manner unknown, become overbalanced by the load shifting to the further end of the vehicle. The result was that with the removing of the man's weight the wagon box tilted suddenly, and the horses, scared by the commotion, started on a run. Mr. Bahan was thrown to the ground and dragged a number of rods, sustaining a broken leg. The injured man was taken to the Exchange Hotel [Montrose] and Dr. Gardner attended. When a leg is broken between the knee and the hip, as it was in this case, the leg almost invariably is shortened if the bone is immediately set, owing to the contracting of the tendons when the ends of the broken bones slide by each other. It was therefore considered advisable to attach heavy weights to the injured leg and thus gradually draw it back into place. Contrary to the general supposition, he was not in very great pain during this trying ordeal. His brothers, Martin and D. J. Bahan, of Friendsville, were in Montrose to learn his condition and secure means for giving him all the required comforts. It will probably be a month before he can be removed from his room at the Exchange [Hotel] to his home in Friendsville.


Hopbottom - Javan Sterling has moved his meat market into the photo gallery. Can Stone will open a feed store in the rooms vacated by Javan Sterling.


Susquehanna - The Baptist and Methodist congregations will unite in a temperance rally at Hogan Opera House on Sunday evening. AND The Erie laid off 123 men in the shops here last week.


Brandt - At a special meeting of the Lackawanna Presbytery, held at Scranton on Monday, the pastoral relation between Rev. Samuel H. Potter and the Brandt Presbyterian Church was dissolved and the pulpit declared vacant. Mr. Potter will assume the pastorate of the church at Bridgeton, N. J.


East Bridgewater - Messrs. F. W. Bishop, Charles Lamb, Herbert Walton and George J. Mack, of Montrose, were here Sunday morning. Being great lovers of Nature in all its beauty, it is not at all surprising that these young men are prone to wander away from the noise of the city on the hill, to enact the thrilling drama, "Babes in the Woods." Alonzo McNeil, late of the U. S. Army, was along and made a good chaperone, and disciplinarian as well. Mr. Bishop, who is an up-to-date draughtsman from Binghamton, is spending long hours in sketching scenes and incidents along the way.


Harford - Allie Capron will be at the Seaman's House with a fine line of millinery from Nov. 18 to 30. AND The people of Harford were very much surprised to hear of the death of Mrs. Geo. Peck, as she was able to get supper Thursday night and was dead Friday morning, Oct. 30.


New Milford - The owners of the creamery have put in a dam just below the railroad bridge for the purpose of turning the water into their pond at the creamery. AND Inez Shelp has accepted a position in the crockery department of the Boston Store in Binghamton.


North Bridgewater - Charley Holbrook caught a raccoon recently that weighed 18 pounds.


Lawsville - The Smith house on the hill from Lawsville, burned last week; the house was vacant; the origin of the fire is unknown. AND B. L. Bailey and wife have a new piano.


Laurel Lake - As Miss Lydia Rodgers has accepted a position in Binghamton for the winter; a farewell surprise party was given her at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. A. Hayes, Wednesday evening, Oct. 28. Dancing was indulged in, music by Laurel Lake orchestra. After refreshments, remarks were made by G. C. Hill and Miss Rodgers was presented with a purse containing several dollars, with a desire for her to select a present as a remembrance from her friends.


South Montrose - Saturday, Oct 31, marked a red-letter day in the history of our town, it being the initial trip of a wide gauge Lehigh Valley R. R. engine and passenger coach. The making of our road to a standard gauge will be of much value to the surrounding country and this place is destined to be one of the largest shipping points on the Montrose branch of the L. V. R. R.


Birchardville - All speak in praise of our new Doctor, A. L. Hickok.


Lathrop - Messrs Johnson & Lord have been pressing hay in this vicinity. Harry Kinney, while driving team for them, slipped from the seat and caught his foot in the press, hurting it very badly. AND Samuel Marcy's place is much improved by a new barn being erected by the Oakley Bros.


West Auburn - On Saturday, between the hours of 12 and 1 o'clock, the large barn of C. A. Place burned with all its contents. Origin of the fire unknown.


South Gibson - An entertainment and oyster supper will be given on the evening of Nov. 12, in McNamara hall, under the auspices of Morgan's Band. AND Truman Woodard and wife of Humboldt, Ia., are visiting relatives.


Brooklyn - Geo. W. Sterling was born in Brooklyn, July 20, 1823, and has lived in the same neighborhood all his life, dying within a mile of his birthplace, Nov. 2, '03. He was converted when about 17 years. His name appears on the class book of the M. E. church in 1841. He was married in 1850 to Lucy Grace Garland, with whom he lived happily for 53 years; she survives him. Three children were born to the couple, two daughters, Mrs. Eldridge and Mrs. Case, both of Brooklyn; and one son, Willis, who departed this life at the age of 8 years. They had another son by adoption, Herbert, who shared in their love and care for 30 years, "and he was not, for God took him." Brother Sterling needs no eulogy; his life was an open book read and known of all men. His last Sunday on earth he attended public worship morning and evening. The end came at the breakfast table. Clasping his hands over his heart and exclaiming, "O blessed God I'm dying," he mounted the chariot and ascended to Heaven.

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