Search
  • webmaster045

November 07 1902

Brandt - Several citizens of Brandt will apply for a charter for an intended corporation, to be known as the Brandt Clay Product Co.


Susquehanna - Corse and Winans, photographers, have formed a co-partnership. AND The bell at the tower of the Susquehanna Universalist church, which has not been in use for several years, has been purchased by a Kingsley church congregation.


Silver Lake - Miss Lydia Hill pleasantly entertained her Sunday school class of young men, and Mrs. Alice Rodgers' class of young ladies, at her home Friday evening, Oct. 31. Games wee indulged in. Light refreshments were served by Miss Hill, assisted by Mrs. Carrie Meeker and Mrs. Bell Hill. All reported a very enjoyable evening. Those present were Daisy Bramfitt, Lydia Rodgers, Lucia and Ruth Meeker, Luella, Georgia and Emily Hill, and Andrew Martin, George Palmer, Floyd Jenner, Charles Rodgers, Chalmers and Lincoln Bramfitt.


Brooklyn - The Brooklyn High School is one of the best of its kind in Susquehanna Co. Prof. M.W. Stephens, with three able assistants, have charge of about 100 students. Brooklyn supports, besides this school, three churches and for 35 years has not had a license hotel. A good place to send your boys and girls for preparatory education.


Forest City - The Forest City News last week entered on its sixteenth year. AND Although the collieries of the Hillside Coal and Iron company are again in operation, there is much grumbling among the men over the fact that the non-unionists are retained in the places they have filled.


Hallstead - The American Chair factory is filling an order for thirty-six Morris chairs for a western hotel.


Harford - Miss Hattie Chamberlain has accepted a position with Lazarus Brothers, prominent Wilkes-Barre merchants, to attend to their advertising. She is a graduate of the Page-Davis School of Advertising, of Chicago, and goes to that city very well recommended as an "ad" writer.


Thompson - There is little likelihood that the trestle on the Jefferson division of the Erie, near Thompson, will ever be filled in. A large force of men have been at work on the project all summer without any appreciable success. Over 5,000 carloads of earth and rock have been dumped into the cut and apparently lost. Much of it has sunk out of sight and the rest carried some feet from the trestle by the quicksand on which it was dumped.


Montrose - A person standing in front of the Republican [newspaper] office may count nearly 70 separate wires, either telephone, telegraph or electric. This, however, is only a part of those already in use, and many more are being strung. An extra crossbar is being placed on the poles leading to South Montrose, Dimock and Springville and poles for the Brooklyn branch are being set. Besides this the telephone line along the tracks of the Montrose branch of the Lehigh Valley has just been completed. Montrose has a network of wires which is seldom seen in a place with three times the number of inhabitants, and the service received from both local and long distance companies is unsurpassed.


South Montrose - The Aid Society will meet with Mrs. A. Wells, Nov. 13. Every lady to bring thimbles and something to eat. Dinner will be served. A general invitation to all of the gentlemen to bring hammers and help re-shingle the church sheds.


Great Bend - The Alonzo Hatch Electric Photo Musical Co. is billed to be at Kistler Opera House, Saturday evening, Nov. 15.


Retta, Auburn Twp. - The dedicatory services of the church will be held on Saturday, Nov. 15, beginning at 10 o'clock. The services will be in charge of Dr. Sweet, assisted by Dr. VanCleft and others. An oyster dinner will be served by the Aid Society at Robert Stevens', near the church, the proceeds of which will be used to finish the indebtedness. The pulpit furniture, a gift of Mrs. Jennie Brundage, nee Wilcox, of Scranton, was received on Saturday.


Uniondale - A party of witches gathered at the "Band Hall" on Hallowe'en, found themselves out-witted by other witches, and instead of stalking abroad for mischief, were kept prisoners until too near morning for witchery. Good!


Foster [Hop Bottom] - Mystery [still] surrounds the strange death of H.F. Lord at Scranton. Lord was brought to this city from Mt. Pocono on the 1o'clock train, horribly mangled and in a dying condition. No one seemed to know how or when the accident occurred, and little information could be obtained from the railroad men. Up to this time nothing suspicious developed in the case, which was regarded as a plain accident. Upon notifying the family, however, questions have arisen which cannot be answered. Upon the person of his father, his son found a check for $200 given by J.L. Crawford, president of the People's Coal Co.


Developments would show that the deceased drove to this city last Thursday with a load of farm products from his place at Foster. Seven days were consumed in the sale, together with that of his team of horses purchased by Mr. Crawford on Saturday. The products realized about $40. Mr. Crawford stated that the deceased was accompanied by a man named Henderson, also of Foster. Nothing has been heard of Henderson since the death of Lord.


After the sale of the horses, Lord left, presumably for home, with about $240 in his pocket. Whether he was accompanied by anyone is unknown. He went to the Lackawanna depot and boarded a south-bound train for Mt. Pocono, in the directly opposite direction for home. That was the last trace of him obtained until he was picked up on the railroad track, a short time later.


Why he should have gone south instead of north to his home is mysterious. When found, but little currency was left on his person. Friends and relatives suspect foul play. What deepens the mystery is that fact that Lord owns a quarry in Foster, the operation of which involved considerable litigation some time ago. Lord received a $4000 settlement. A motion for a new trial was made and strange to say, the decision was to have been made yesterday. Lord was 54 years of age and is survived by three sons.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

January 02 1920

Montrose – Seven prisoners escaped from County Jail early Christmas night. They managed to affect their escape and all but one, the youngest, were recaptured. Chance led the last man to get through th

December 26 1919

Susquehanna – Daniel Smith, of Lanesboro, a switchman in the Susquehanna Railroad yards, was instantly killed by passenger train No. 5, Dec. 20, 1919. He had been in the switchmen’s shanty getting war

December 19 1919

Herrick Twp. – Gardner Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel G. Lee, near Tirzah, accidentally shot himself and passed away almost instantly. He had been out hunting and came to the school house at Dart’