Search
  • webmaster045

August 15 1902

Susquehanna - In Beebe Park, on Saturday afternoon, the Susquehanna Stars defeated the Great Bend team, and a battery imported from Scranton, 7 and 5. Taylor pitched his first game and it was an excellent one. When is the Montrose team coming over for its medicine? AND The sewerage question still slumbers sweetly.


Lanesboro - Mrs. Phoebe Ann Rouse Cook, Amboy, Ill., Aug. 3d, celebrated her 100th birthday. Mrs. Cook was born at Lanesboro and was married in 1823 to Daniel Cook. Two of her children are living, Samuel Cook, aged 75, living at Columbus, Kansas, who was a soldier in the Mexican war, and J.J. Cook, aged 78, who served in the Civil war. Mr. Cook died in 1882, at Sublette, Lee County, Illinois.


Brooklyn - An old time picnic by some of the older citizens was held here Tuesday last. As the day was clear, ten o'clock in the morning witnessed many vehicles winding along the hillsides enroute to the home of Milton Palmer, where tables had been erected and seats provided for all who might come. At 12:30 some 55 persons, many of whom had been reared together from childhood, sat down to tables that were loaded with necessaries and luxuries, as none know how to prepare, only those well versed in the culinary art. After partaking of the bountiful repast and feeling as Philadelphia aldermen look, the tables were again filled with watermelon and ice cream, to the satisfaction of the most fastidious taste. After a little interchange of friendly greeting all were invited into the home of the host and hostess where a Scripture lesson was read by Dr. Sage and prayer offered by Mrs. Porter. Many reminiscences of the past were vividly brought to mind, which made our hearts sad, and yet the occasion was one in life, which our minds will wander back to that which will give much satisfaction. After adieus had been said all departed homeward feeling it had been a joy to be there.


Great Bend - Mrs. Clark is having her residence on Church street painted bottle green.


Howard Hill, Liberty Twp. - The many friends of Elmer Bailey, whose barn was recently struck by lightning, have kindly contributed toward building a new barn-some giving money, others material. A good many have given him hay for his stock. Elsewhere in Liberty Twp.- in Brookdale - The only crow farm in the U.S. is operated by a Brookdale farmer whose name is Billings. Mr. Billings raises the crows for their Beautiful feathers and heads, which are eagerly purchased by milliners. The industry is a paying one, as the young crows are ready for the milliner when two weeks old, and the expense for their keeping is small.


Silver Lake - Dr. Lena Caswell, of Binghamton, spent Sunday with friends here, and left for Montrose on the 11th, where she expects to spend one day each week if enough patients apply to make it worth while to take the trip.


Silvara, Bradford Co. - On Saturday our boys went over to L. Haire's to cross bats with the Rush team, and lost the game by one count, the score being 8-9 in favor of Rush. But we have no doubt they would have won, had not the other side been made up mostly of picked men from other places; "no fair."


Forest City - Forest City still lacks a tax collector, and the borough and poor treasuries are empty, making that unwelcome officer a much-needed blessing to the town.


North Jackson - James Kerwin, a North Jackson farmer, has a very intelligent horse which takes a wagonload of milk to the creamery mornings and returns to the bark without a driver, says a correspondent in an exchange. Mr. Kerwin also possesses a very remarkable dog that awakens the family every morning by barking just as the clock strikes five. The owner of these intelligent animals has spent years of patient labor in educating his pets, of whose feats he is justly proud.


Montrose - Miss Sue M. Strous, for the past five years a stenographer and for the past two years a student at law in the office of John M. Kelly, was admitted to practice in the several courts of Susquehanna County, at the opening session of Court on Monday morning. Miss Strous enters upon the practice of her profession as the youngest lady member of the bar.


Herrick Centre - Charles Foster has moved his shingle mill from Burnwood to the farm of D.O. Price, in West Herrick.


Fair Hill, Jessup Twp. -Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Valentine wish to thank their friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted at the haying bee Aug. 12. It was a great help to them, as they had nearly 30 acres yet undone. Those that attended were G. L. Shelp, O.E. Green, Fred Russell, Will Everett, H. Valentine, Fred and Augustus Shelp, Harvey Greenwood, C.C. Burr, Harry Stevens, Earl Very, Frank McKeeby, Robertson and Olin VanAukin.


News Briefs - "Jack the Ink-slinger" is a new desperado that haunts Elmira and tosses blots of ink on the dainty summer dresses of women whom he passes after dark. AND A Pennsylvania judge has decided that any dog has a legal right to bite any man, woman or child who disturbs said dog's tranquility and peace of mind by tying to said dog's tail any weight which will impede or tend to impede the progress of said animal, etc. This decision should be largely circulated among small boys and dogs. AND It is reported that many of the lakes in the eastern part of the county are being dynamited by striking miners in order to procure large quantities of fish with little trouble. If apprehended they should be severely dealt with. Absolute starvation would not justify such means of securing fish. AND A visit to the soldiers' camp at Shenandoah at almost any hour of the day will convince even the most skeptical that there is distress among the families of the strikers. Colonel Hoffman says that about 500 women and children come to camp every day with baskets, gathering the scraps of food that are left over from the soldiers' allowance. The soldiers always carefully save what is left after mess, and many of the big-hearted fellows deprive themselves of the best part of their own meals in order to alleviate the sufferings of the wives and children of the miners.

Recent Posts

See All

January 02 1920

Montrose – Seven prisoners escaped from County Jail early Christmas night. They managed to affect their escape and all but one, the youngest, were recaptured. Chance led the last man to get through th

December 26 1919

Susquehanna – Daniel Smith, of Lanesboro, a switchman in the Susquehanna Railroad yards, was instantly killed by passenger train No. 5, Dec. 20, 1919. He had been in the switchmen’s shanty getting war

December 19 1919

Herrick Twp. – Gardner Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel G. Lee, near Tirzah, accidentally shot himself and passed away almost instantly. He had been out hunting and came to the school house at Dart’