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October 24 1901

Susquehanna - The Tiger foot ball team of this place defeated a team composed of Railroad trainmen by a score of 5 to 10, in Hallstead, Saturday afternoon. The Tigers are not full grown while the Hallstead team averaged 165 pounds. Tiger line up: F. Donovan, left in.; J. McCarthy, left tackle; J. Ahearn, left guard; W. Ryan, captain, center; J. Geary, right guard; L. Montgomery, right tackle; J. Irving, right in; B. Leslie, quarterback; M. Ryan, touch down; Frank Robbins, Jr., Referee. AND A public mass meeting to consider the question of a central fire station will be held in Hogan Opera House. Prior to the meeting there will be a parade of the fire departments, headed by the Susquehanna band.


Montrose - The San Francisco Minstrels at Village Hall on Wednesday night gave a strictly first-class entertainment. The quartette singing was especially fine, the end men's "gags" were mostly new, all funny and none offensive. The baton twirler, the slack wire performer, and the contortionist, were each artists in their line and the specialties were all A No. 1. The audience, though highly appreciative, was not as large as was merited. Should this company return at a later date the hall would be packed. Manager Titsworth is to be congratulated upon the excellent character of the entertainments he is securing. AND The Indian, which stands guard at D.V. Gardner's popular cigar store, looks very imposing in his new suit of red.


Birchardville - The reputation of the fine blooded stock raised by our progressive Susquehanna county farmers extends far beyond the confines of our county, as is frequently proven by the sale of such animals to breeders at distant points. The latest evidence of this fact is a handsome Jersey bull calf brought to Montrose this week by L.T. Birchard & Son and shipped to Morristown, N.J., where his purchaser will place him at the head of a fine herd of Jersey thoroughbreds. This calf comes of proud lineage, his sire being "Brown Bessie's Medium" which head the Birchard herd and which was purchased of parties in Wisconsin. He is in breeding close up to "Brown Bessie," champion butter cow at the Chicago World's Fair and "Merry Maiden," the sweepstakes cow at the World's Fair. On his mother's side the calf is equally well bred.


Hallstead - The chair factory is running until nine o'clock every night so as to fill orders.


St. Joseph - Chicken pox has been a visitor in this vicinity. AND The farmers have been drawing potatoes to Montrose the past week. The price received was 45 cts. A bushel. The prospects of an advance seem certain.


Lakeside - We noticed at church on Sunday, the representation of four generations of the Robinson family, including Mrs. Hannah Robinson, Mrs. Rodney Morse, and Mrs. Major and baby daughter of Lestershire [now Johnson City].


Lindaville [Brooklyn Twp.] - The children enjoyed nut-gathering last week during their vacation.


Jackson Valley- The Middletown nine played a game of ball with the Neath nine on the latter's grounds, Saturday, which resulted in a score of 31 and 17 in favor of Middletown.


Elk Lake - J.G. Cart is digging and laying pipes to a large spring on his farm, so as to bring water to his house and barn.


Rush - Frank Crandall, a well to do farmer, living between Rushville and Stevensville, was accidentally killed while coming from Wyalusing last Saturday with a load of coal. Just how it happened is not known.


Uniondale - Miss Lottie Eastman invited her Sunday school class to meet at the parsonage and treated them to the delicacies of the season, and then gave them a menu of a different kind-a free, full and enthusiastic description of the wonders she had seen at the Pan-American exposition. It was a fine hit.


Dimock - There have been three cases of typhoid fever at Jonas Gray's in Dimock.


Bridgewater Twp. - Justice M.H. VanScoten showed an interesting political relic of war times that had been given him by an old comrade. It is a pin made from the head of a Goddess of Liberty cut from an old-fashioned cent with a pin soldered to its back. Few people could tell what it was, stood for, and when it was used, but the senior editor of the Republican ventured a guess and is proved to be correct. It is a genuine "copperhead" pin, such as was worn in war times by those pestiferous sympathizers with the Rebs-the "Knights of the Golden Circle." In those days the vicinity of Williams' Pond was inhabited by many members of that order, and this pin was found in the cellar of the house now occupied by Comrade Chandler Stephens, but then occupied by a southern sympathizer.


Franklin Forks - Southwell Post, No. 222, G.A.R., celebrated their 20th anniversary, the 30th of October. On this beautiful day, comrades with their wives were promptly on hand at their pleasant Post room to welcome their visiting friends, who began to arrive between 10 and 11 o'clock. There was a lively time in the dining hall, while Comrades' wives and daughters made ready the sumptuous banquet, and outside the comrades enjoyed themselves in story telling, reminiscence and pitching quoits. At 12 o'clock the call came to fall in for dinner and two large tables were promptly filled. Rev. N.S. Sage invoked the divine blessing. With keen appetites the invited guests attacked the tempting viands before them and all was seasoned with wit and repartee, until there was too much fullness for utterance, then they retired and the tables were re-set and again filled. Cigars seemed to be free and most comrades took a smoke, as substitute for the pipe of peace. Games of quoits were resumed with as much spirit as full stomachs would allow. At 2 P.M. all assembled in the Post room, where remarks were made by various comrades. Comrade Vance spoke a few words for the noble women-didn't know where he would have been if he had never had a mother. After a few words from some others, the assembly broke up; the parting salutations were uttered, and all started homeward, with feelings of pleasure and satisfaction over a day happily spent. It will long be a pleasant memory.

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