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July 19 1901

Forest City - The house of John Lesco burned to the ground on Friday night last. The origin of the flames is unknown. Mr. Lesco had not been sleeping in the dwelling since his wife was killed by lightning on the previous Tuesday. He, however, prepared his meals there, using wood fires and it is thought a spark may have caused the destruction. The building was insured for about ten hundred dollars. Most of this money will go to the contractor who built the structure. The last half dozen years have been full of trouble for Lesco. His wife was killed by a bolt of lightning last week. His only child died from the effect of scalds received by falling into a tub of hot water. About three years ago he was in the meat business and lost a pocket book containing $300. The money was never recovered and he was forced to retire from business. He has worked at the D. & H. mill for years and is an industrious man.


Liberty Twp. - The following teachers are reported for term of 1901-02. Turrell district, Pearl Lindsley, of New Milford; Lawsville, Nina Roe, of Fairdale; Pleasant Valley, Alma Williams, of Dimock; Chalker school, Katherine Dolan, of Brookdale; Wilbur school, Ellen Donovan, of Liberty; Hillside school, Mary Cosgriff, of Lawsville; Mountain Valley, Jennie Luce, of Stanfordville.


Uniondale - Asher Burdick, an aged gentleman residing near Uniondale, was seriously injured at Forest City on Friday last. He was standing in front of Jones Bros. Shoe store holding a team when W.A. Weber's team, which had been standing near Prokopovitz's hotel, became frightened and started up the street. Burdick, who was standing with his back toward the runaways, did not see nor hear them. He was struck by the wagon pole and knocked down, receiving a fractured shoulder, three broken ribs and a number of severe bruises. His son, who is a victim of heart disease, saw the accident and was nearly prostrated by the shock.


Springville - People who are disposed to find fault with a local correspondent because they do not see a lot of news every week, should bear in mind the fact that he never gets any pay for his work. When the people have something that would be newsy, why would it not be just as well to hand it in and not wait for the news gatherer to come around and ask them about it? The correspondent would be very glad to have news handed to him for it would save him a lot of trouble, and insure a letter every week.


Susquehanna - Several members of the Avenue Methodist Church were on Sunday afternoon immersed in the river, on the Oakland side, Rev. Meeker, pastor of the Lanesboro church, officiating.


Dundaff - The terrible hot weather we have had for the past few weeks makes the city people think of the cool breezes around Crystal Lake, and they are flocking thitherward. Fern Hall and the Mullawney House are filled with boarders, all the cottages are occupied and a number of tents are seen here and there. At Newton Lake the cottages are occupied and a few tents are up and occupied.


Auburn Corners - Huckleberries are selling at the rate of eleven quarts for one dollar.


Franklin Forks - Mrs. A.M. Snow is serving ice cream in her house adjoining Alliance Hall every Saturday evening, so that lovers of the frozen sweet can be supplied. David Turrell has a stand in the hall, where he sells cream to all who call for it. AND Edwin Truesdell's boys have returned to their home in the Parlor City. We miss them on our streets, especially their fine little pony and cart. The boys in town used to enjoy riding around with them, and some of the girls too.


West Auburn - While working in the hay field for his cousin, Harry Sturdevant, the other day, Walter Owen killed a blacksnake that measured 6 1/2 ft. in length and as large as a man's arm, and but a few feet from him Harry killed another measuring 5 ft. in length, and soon after two smaller ones were killed, all on less than an acre of ground. Quite a snake story, but nevertheless true.


Hopbottom - The funeral of Phineas Phillips was held at West Lenox church Wednesday at one o'clock. He died at the Moses Taylor hospital Monday night. It is sad for a young man only 19 years old to meet with such an accident, it being his first regular trip on the road. He was on an engine which collided with another and the hot coals which were thrown over him were the cause of his death.


Harford - One of the pleasantest events of the season was a birthday party, Monday, July 22, given by the relatives of Mrs. Hannah Coughlin in honor of her 80th birthday. Remembrances were left and a very sumptuous dinner was served by her daughter, Mrs. Julia Esterbrook, at whose home the gathering was held.


Lakeside - George Rice and Monroe Moshier attended teachers' examination at Great Bend Saturday. Mr. Moshier will teach the Moxley school the coming year and Mr. Rice the East Lake School.


Hallstead - Lisie Eighmy traded horses with a man from Cortland several days ago. He gave the Cortland individual a good horse and twenty dollars. Later on a constable appeared and took the horse from Eighmy claiming that it was stolen by the Cortland man. Now Eighmy is out the cash and has no horse.


Oakley - A certain young man living toward Cameron's Corners, has the laugh on a large coterie of friends. Some of the latter had become rather suspicious as to the outcome of his rather frequent trips down the valley and one evening, learning that a lady had come home with him, without investigating further, a large crowd armed with tin pans, horns, etc., gathered to give him a serenade in honor of his supposed secret wedding. Judge their dismay when they were informed that his mother had come home with him to visit her old friends in this vicinity.


Elk Lake - You can get your feed ground at the Elk Lake mill for five cents a hundred.


Montrose - On July 24th the young ladies gave a subscription dance at Village Hall and the neat programmes stated that it was a "Spinster Dance." It was strictly a leap year affair. A "Stocking Social" was held at the Baptist church Wednesday evening.

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