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May 17 1901

St. Joseph - In an article in the New York Sun, last week, under the heading: "They Are Twin Priests," the statement is made that the Rev. Frs. Prendergast are the only twin priests in the world. This, however, is an error. Fr. James O'Reilly, of the Scranton Cathedral and Fr. Edward O'Reilly, of Wilkes-Barre, both graduates of Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass., are twin priests and were born at St. Joseph, Pa., where their two sisters and one brother still reside.


South Montrose - During the thunder storm of May 17, F.S. Wells, of South Montrose, had 11 cows prostrated and five of them were killed. Loss, $300; insurance, $100.


Susquehanna - Early indications point to a large rattle snake crop this season. AND The vested choir of Christ Episcopal Church intends to produce several light operas in the fall.


Lanesboro - The bakery wagon of Charles Schmidt was upset on Willow Street in Susquehanna on Saturday morning and Mr. Schmidt was thrown out and severely injured about the head and face. AND Thursday evening the following class of 1901 will graduate: Rena Mae Brown, Irene Jane Plew, Maud Millicent Spears, Lena Grace Whitney, Libbie Catherine McCullough, Willard Austin Spears, John Earl Jacobs, Charles Simon Flaherty, Benjamin Franklin Tewksbury.


Fair Hill, Jessup Twp. - The Sunday school reorganized on Sunday, May 5, and will hold their sessions at 3 o'clock every Sunday afternoon beginning promptly and closing in one hour's time. The following were elected: Supt., Mrs. F.A. Lewis, Ass't. Supt., Stinson Youngs; Treas., Miss Edith Darrow; Sec'y, Ross Baldwin; Organist, Mrs. F.A. Lewis; Ass't Org., Mrs. Will Spaulding. The teachers are Rev. Cochrane, Mrs. Amos Sutton, F.D. Terwilliger and Mrs. A.P. Hines.


Lynn - Mrs. W.B. Fish wishes to make it known that she will weave good rag carpet, also rugs, at her home in this place. All work quickly done.


Transue, Auburn Twp. - Charlie Tewksbury and wife returned to their home at Kerwin, Wyoming, where they expect to stay another year looking after gold.


Kingsley - Mrs. May Carpenter, of Hopbottom, was calling on friends in town Monday. Her two daughters, Josie and Mildred, have been admitted to the Harford Soldiers' Orphans' school.


Silver Lake - Arbutus is past and our woods are now brightened by violets and many other flowers of May. The forests are gay with the red maples and bright green of other trees, contrasting with the white bloom of wild cherry and June berry. AND William Hayes, aged 14 years, is probably the youngest fireman in this county, being employed in that capacity in Rose Brothers' steam mill, and is giving good satisfaction.


Hopbottom - Sunday, as Earl Tiffany and Claud Roberts were riding out with Chan. Carpenter's spirited horse, the axletree broke, letting a hind wheel off and causing the carriage to upset, throwing the young men out. Fortunately no damage was done except to the carriage. The horse ran a short distance and was caught by Warren Gardner.


Montrose - A beautiful new imperial pulpit Bible was presented to the M.E. church last week by Joseph E. Barney's class of young men. Mrs. Edith Jones' class of young ladies are to make an appropriate pulpit cover for it to rest upon. Each week finds another memorial window taken. AND Wm. M. Post, Esq., says the streets of Montrose are in the worst shape they have been in for 40 years.


Springville - Cyrus Marcey is some better; was able to come to town to see a physician on Saturday. About a week ago a young bull attacked Mr. Marcey, injuring him very severely, both breaking and putting his shoulder out of place. Probably would have killed him, but the creature in tossing him partly threw him under the fence; no one saw the attack and [he] would probably have been killed but for that. His wife knew nothing about it until he came to the house.


Little Meadows - Mrs. Major has just received a fine line of millinery goods from New York. AND Mr. and Mrs. Wood, of Carmalt Lake, have the sympathy of all in their recent bereavement, the death of their infant daughter.


Great Bend - The following students will graduate from the high school, May 29, at Kistler's Opera House: Misses Daisy Lines, Ruby Meagley, Mary Kilrow, Mamie and Bessie Doyle, Hattie Barry, Florence Trowbridge; Flora Gunn, Minnie Becker, Mabel Jaynes, Iva Folweiler, Bessie Vaughn, May Hamlin, Mabel Fisher; Messrs. Ray Reckhow, George O'Neill, Edward Kilrow, Samuel Parks, John Stockholm, John Handrick;


Maulmain, Burmah - Word was received that Dr. Ellen Mitchell died April 6 in that place. Dr. Mitchell was born at New Milford in 1829 to Seth and Comphey Lewis Mitchell. She responded to the need for nurses during the Civil War and was appointed to the Union Hotel Hospital and took charge of Louisa M.Alcott's ward after she left. In 1863 Miss [Dorothea] Dix sought her services for a hospital at New Haven and next she went to Fredericksburg, Va. where she found the hillsides covered with wounded soldiers. From Fredericksburg Miss Mitchell again returned to Washington and took charge of a ward of fifty beds. The soldiers called her "our Nellie" and she devoted nearly her entire pay as an army nurse to relieving the wants of the suffering. After the war ended Ellen taught school in several places and then entered her name as a student of medicine in the office of Dr. C.C. Halsey, Montrose. She graduated from the Woman's Medical College of New York in 1870 and was eventually appointed a medical missionary to Maulmain, Burmah, by the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions in 1879. Here she founded a leper hospital and during the 22 years of her work only made one visit to the United States, in 1889, visiting her home here and obtaining additional instruction at New York hospitals. About six months ago, Dr. Mitchell's health began to fail and she had decided to return home on April 6. On the very day set for her departure, the end came peacefully. [Ellen E. Mitchell was featured in the book Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience, published in 1868].

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