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March 01 1901

Bradley's Corners (New Milford Twp) - A few days ago John Moffatt's horse, "Black Kit," was being driven by Mrs. Moffatt, when it became frightened, upsetting the cutter, throwing out Mrs. Moffatt and her mother, Mrs. Harrison, and bruising them slightly. The horse ran away and when found was near Mr. Lewis' barn; the horse was somewhat lamed and the cutter was broken.


New Milford - New Milford has a band of "white caps," at least as far as the work of that organization is concerned. A few nights since a house on Depot street was visited and when they left the house was not in shape to rent. Doors and windows were destroyed as was considerable of the contents. The place has for some time been a resort for questionable characters.


Penn Avon (Clifford Twp.)- Owing to some dissatisfaction among our people in regard to the name of our post office, Welsh Hill, it was decided to change the name, and for that purpose a meeting was held in "The Hall" on Saturday evening. Several names were suggested, but the one chosen was "Penn Avon," a name proposed by one of our oldest residents, Mr. Richard Davis.


Rush - George Fargo, a respected resident of East Rush, died on Tuesday evening Feb. 19, and was buried the following Saturday. His wife, Serepta Fargo, survived him by ten days, dying on Saturday, March 2.


Franklin Forks - Thomas and John Scott returned from their trip to Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. They went with Co. G of Montrose to participate in the inaugural of the President.


Harford - The funeral of Otis Grinnell was largely attended from this place Saturday. His only child living, Mrs. Will Bailey, of Ohio, was so prostrated by the news of his death that she was unable to attend the funeral. AND The Oregon Medicine Company have their headquarters at Odd Fellows hall.


Auburn - At the indoor games of Georgetown University, held on Saturday last, J.W. D. Tewksbury, formerly of Auburn, this county, but more recently of Tunkhannock, a student in the University of Pennsylvania, created a new fifty yard high hurdle record in seven seconds flat.


Lanesboro - The famous Starrucca viaduct on the Erie will soon be inspected and repaired. New ties are on and will shortly be put in. There are 1400 of them as the bridge is a quarter of a mile long; the present ties were put down in 1894, about 7 years ago. The grade at that point is 32 feet to the mile so that the north end of the bridge is 8 feet higher than the south end. The viaduct is familiarly known as the "stone bridge," has 19 arches and is one of the largest stone viaducts in the country.


Bridgewater Twp. - Fred Bush and Russell King, two bright and enterprising young lads of the township, took it into their heads that they must, if possible, be in Washington on Monday last to witness the inauguration of the President. With this idea in view they bravely started out on their own hook, intending to walk to Laceyville or Wyalusing, and there take passage on a Lehigh Valley train. They left their homes on Friday and that night reached the home of E.W. Bolles in Jessup and partook of his hospitality, resuming their journey the next morning. Meanwhile their absence had been discovered and Mr. Bush was hot on the trail. He overtook them over in Bradford county and persuaded them to accompany him home. Thus vanished the boys' hopes of seeing the sights of the Nation's Capital, but their patriotic desire and the zeal with which they went about attaining it simply shows that they are typical American boys, and have a determination to "get there" that does not halt at what to less adventurous youths might seem insurmountable obstacles.


Susquehanna - The Avenue Methodist congregation, on Tuesday evening, enjoyed a sleighride to Bradley Beebe's, Oakland township. AND The Susquehanna Telephone and Telegraph Company already has 112 subscribers.


Great Bend - Editor More, of the Great Bend Plaindealer, who is also Mayor of Great Bend, recently visited Washington and on Sunday attended the Metropolitan Methodist church. In his paper he says he "sat near President McKinley." The President probably never suspected at the time, the great peril he was in. With the President of the United States and the mayor of Great Bend in its pews at the same time, it was a red letter day in the annals of the famous church.


Jackson - North Jackson people will soon be able to talk with all the earth by means of the long distance phone, as connections will be made between Thompson and New Milford.


Hallstead - Hallstead is to have a three-story brick block on the corner of Pine and Church St. The first floor will be used for post office and store, the second for dwelling rooms, and the hall.


Flynn - Miss Lizzie Giblin, of Silver Lake, who has been rusticating in Middletown, has returned to her home. AND Montrose boys who contemplate a trip to Middletown should purchase a map of the roads before starting, especially during a snow storm.


Glenwood - During the severe cold weather, C.L. Swartz, while helping C.W. Hoppe gather ice, had the misfortune to take a bath in about 5 feet of water. No bad results of it.


Little Meadows - A gasoline lamp exploded in the office of J.E. Hickey's hotel, burning John Humphrey about the head and face. AND Ray Dowd reports bad roads through the Bear Swamp.


Clifford - Ludie, wife of Willie Miller, very suddenly and unexpectedly departed this life March 1st. Ludie was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.F. Lowry. While living in Clifford she was always spoken of as one of the nicest girls of Clifford. About a year ago she married one of our most quiet and steady young men, Willie Miller. She was about and was loved and respected by everybody that knew her. She was always very healthy, never sick, until a few days before her death. She was taken sick, the doctor called; he thinking she had pendicitis, called other doctors and they performed an operation but found they made a mistake, brain fever set in and in a few days she was dead. Her funeral was largely attended at the Baptist church Sunday the 3d.

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