March 06 (1902/2002)

 

 

Lanesboro - There is no small pox at Germantown [as reported last week]. The Miss Clark, who was visiting there, was not exposed to the disease at Binghamton, hence her quarantine was unnecessary, but it was all right as a precautionary measure.

 

Susquehanna - The late floods did little damage, but the county bridge between Susquehanna and Oakland was in danger on Sunday and Monday and it was closed to the public. The town was without electric lights on Saturday night. When the rains descend and the floods come there are more things than living in a town that is set on a hill. AND Joseph Fallon, a laborer employed in the Erie shops, on Monday evening, fell down the basement steps in front of the Smith block, on East Main St., and sustained injuries from which he died in a few minutes. He was unmarried and lived with a sister, Mrs. Judge, on East Main Street. The funeral will occur today from the Catholic Church.

 

Hallstead - Only once in the history of Hallstead has the Susquehanna risen above the mark of last Saturday's freshet. For sixty hours the water covered property that has been free from floods for 36 years. The floating ice broke the posts that supported the stack wire at the electric plant which caused the 80-foot stack to fall Saturday afternoon and the town was in total darkness. The ice, ranging from 15 to 20 inches in thickness, struck the Hallstead bridge abutments, knocking the point off one and damaging a stringer on the upper side, which will close bridge traffic for some days. The Red Rock tannery barn came sailing down and fortunately struck an abutment of the bridge. If it had struck the bridge it would have carried away a span as the current was about six miles per hour. The bank of the river was thronged with people watching the ice go out. The waters were the highest ever known here. Cellars were flooded, Messrs. Howard, Carl and Kellogg, and others, living on the flat and on the other side, were rescued by boats.

 

Montrose - Rev. J.W. Raynor, a well known and grand, good, old gentleman, who is in his 80th year, undertook quite a jaunt on March 2, regardless of the rain and snow. He walked to the Fordham farm or more better known as the Lane farm in New Milford Township, six miles from Montrose, to attend a funeral at which he was to preach. There is not many young men of half the age [who] would have started on such a day as that to walk such a distance. AND One of the worst storms of the season came along March 5 and again filled the roads with snow and drifts. This morning the sun shines brightly and there is nothing to do but shovel snow and look pleasant.

 

Clifford -The Postal Telegraph Cable Company expects to commence work on the new line from West Clifford through Royal and Clifford to Carbondale in about four weeks. This will dispose of the line through Dundaff. AND In Royal, C.N. West is about to rent the Royal Hotel, to be used as a resort for summer boarders.

 

Forest City - The new council was organized by the selecting of D. Fallon as chairman. M.J. Connelly was elected street commissioner and F.B. Carpenter, secretary of council. There was a deadlock for treasurer, J.F. Wellbrock and John McDonald, each receiving three votes. F.M. Gardiner and H.O. Watrous were also tied for borough attorney.

 

Lenox - What shall we do with our milk? Is the leading question of the day. Some producers are in favor of a skimming station at the "Acre," the cream to be taken to Harford. Others seem to be satisfied with the conditions at Nicholson and propose to continue hauling to that place, while still others seem to think that as they have been to the expense of building a creamery, at Hopbottom, it is the duty of the stockholders to patronize it. It is a difficult matter to get the farmers to consolidate, even for their own good.

 

Fair Hill - The ladies of this vicinity are invited to meet with Mrs. G.L. Lewis on Thursday, March 13th, to organize a sewing circle or aid society to help raise money for needed repairs on the church. Come and bring your thimbles.

 

Friendsville - The stages did not arrive here last Friday night on account of the high water and drifts.

 

Flynn - The secret political club of this place got defeated bad this February election.

 

Uniondale - What has become of the board of health? Why don't they see that a culvert is put through under the railroad track in front of Wm. Morgan's so there won't be so much water in the street: Nearly two feet; also cellars flooded. Better get on your life preserver, Will. Also, over on Church street there was a flood ditch made some 20 years ago with some of the cellar drains leading into it, and the dirt and gravel was packed down hard over it and worked well until a few years ago when the supervisors (since retired from that office) put a road worker in there and tore the top off the drain and it has bothered ever since. It has broke out now near Mr. Ferman's and is flooding his yard and we are told another place where Elder Crane had his horse through into the drain and is now asking recompense, which Mr. Crane ought to have, to the amount of the damage; but the supervisor ought to have taken good advise, which he got at the time. Too bad isn't it, but they say mistakes will happen in the best of families. [Word for word].

 

Jackson - On the map of Susquehanna County issued in 1858, a copy of which was recently presented us, are the names and locations of every householder in this county at the time. Mr. E.R. Barrett, of this place, who has been scanning this old map, tells us that in Jackson township the following farmers, whose names are on this map, are still living and remain upon the same farms occupied in 1858. L.D. Benson, Lewis Gates, A.W. Barrett, Alonzo Barrett, Chas. Hazen, Chas. Martin, Ansel Page, S. Griffis, Orin Foster, Thos. Tingley. These gentlemen can very properly be called "old residents," having all resided on the farms now occupied by them for 44 years.

 

March 13 (1902/2002)

 

 

Springville - Once again the quarrymen are getting ready for their summer labor. The Hawke quarry was expecting to get to work, but failed to do so. The others will be at work right along. There are a half dozen of them in all, and there will be a good lot of the product shipped.

 

Brooklyn - The sad news arrived here on Tuesday that Ralph Stephens, a young man about 18 years old, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Stephens of this place, was suddenly killed on the suspension bridge at Niagara, where he was working. Mr. Stephens, accompanied by his sister, Mrs. Eldridge, left Tuesday afternoon for Buffalo, where they will claim the remains.

 

Forest Lake - Moses Mott is our new stage driver from Friendsville to Montrose.

 

Brandt - Wm. Blank, Lena Blank and Martha Peck attended the recital of Paderewski at Scranton, recently.

 

Herrick Centre - The students of the graded school will hold a "hard time social" at the school building, Friday evening, March 14.

 

Auburn Centre - Prof. Clapper closes his singing school this week with a two days' drill followed by a concert on Thursday night.

 

Montrose - W.H. Dennis & Son have this week placed a handsome new awning on the storefront of H.H. Fordham. (Fordham's Soda Fountain has opened for the season.) They have orders for awnings for several other business houses and more coming every day. This can be taken as a reliable sign that spring is here. AND H.P. Read is having the interior of his store renovated and repainted. Electric lights will also be added.

 

Silver Lake - The will of H.K. Sheldon, of Brooklyn, NY, who has had his summer home at Silver Lake for many years, among many other items, leaves to his daughter, Mrs. Russell, the Silver Lake summer home and $15,000 in trust for the Silver Lake Presbyterian church.

 

Uniondale - Westgate and Bronson have cut and shipped about 15,000 tons of ice this winter and [are] still working at it with a large force and Isaac Phillips as chief prodder. By the way, that Frank Westgate is a good all around man. He deals in all kinds of farm machinery, wagons, fertilizers and all of the very best at reasonable prices; a meat market which the people of Uniondale have long been in need of; also dealer in coal. This reminds us of a load of coal that Frank put in our coalhouse. We don't believe the devil himself could keep up a fire with that coal, or even try for fear his imps would go on a strike. But O, My! Wasn't Frank mad! It proved to be a car of this culm washed coal, contrary to Frank's orders. He traced it up and found out where it came from, an imposition by the coal operators on the near by people, to sell their poor trash and ship their good coal father away where they have competitive markets; but by request and Frank's own offer, took that out and replaced it with nice coal and now we are all happy.

 

Susquehanna - The late floods greatly damaged the baseball diamond on Beebe Flats, Oakland Side. AND The Clark-Scoville Repertoire Company appeared in Hogan Opera House on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings to good business.

 

Ararat -Time honored, God blessed and dove like, we were quietly resting high and free from the torrent of our flood washed sister towns last week. We have our breezes, but don't have to roll up our pants if we want to cross the street. AND The saddest thing we have been called on to record is the death of Mr. and Mrs. O. J. [Ordie J. and Dela] Shaver, both dying of pneumonia within five days of each other. They leave a family of six children, the oldest about 17 years, the youngest two years old. They were life long residents of this town and highly respected. The youngest child is very ill with little hope of recovery.

 

Great Bend - The Great Bend Plaindealer reports a rather comical condition that presented itself on the occasion of the primary election in the township recently. The voting place was at the residence of J.F. Carl on the Keystone farm and owing to the high water it could only be reached from any direction by means of boats, being nearly a quarter of a mile from the main land at the nearest point. Then to add to the other trouble, the boys who controlled the water craft combined and put up the fare, and it cost a voter thirty cents for the round trip to the polls.

 

Flynn [Middletown Twp]- Rumor says we are to have several weddings after Easter. Good sleighing brought forth something this winter, even though the trips were long.

 

Dimock - F.P. Mills, of Gordon, Nebraska, is in town. He is a native of Dimock. He and his brother own two large stores in Nebraska, also a large ranch, where they have a thousand head of cattle and 250 horses. He brought a carload of horses with him, for sale, and they are at the Tarbell House barn. He struck very bad weather coming through-blizzards, snow banks, and other delays, and his horses showed effects of it, by the time they reached here, by the way of the Narrow Gauge. But they have been improving fast this week and next Tuesday he has an auction sale, at the Tarbell barn. Come and get your horse.

 

News Briefs - From the Wayne Independent: Christy Mathewson has signed a three years contract with the New York National League team at a salary of $5,000 per year. Pretty good for a Honesdale pitcher. [Christy Mathewson was born in Factoryville, PA]. AND A correction of an article from last week: On Sunday, March 2, Rev. J.W. Raynor, in going to officiate at a funeral on the Fordham farm, was favored with a ride from his home by Mr. A. Sturdevant, to the Mulford farm, and after walking onwards to Mr. Mark Williams' he was halted by Mr. Williams, who kindly volunteered to take the reverend brother the remaining two miles, and this was indeed a friendly favor deserving of thanks. So for fifty percent of the way the Lord provided a conveyance, and also gave the clergyman strength to walk the remainder. In last week's issue, it was stated that Mr. Raynor walked the entire distance, but that gentleman wished that statement corrected as above. We have not a doubt, however, but that Brother Raynor could have made the journey with the ease of a man of half his years.

 

March 20 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - A band of gypsies, a sure indication of almanac spring, passed through town on Monday. AND Mrs. Katherine Perrine and Miss Sophie Calkins, of this place, have opened a millinery establishment at Great Bend.

 

Rush - On Saturday evening, March 15, the Misses Perigo entertained a few of their friends at their home. Dainty refreshments were served and a delightful time enjoyed by all.

 

Franklin Forks - The Ladies' Aid Society, held at the Parsonage, was quite largely attended. A quilt was quilted and considerable other sewing done for Mrs. N.D. Green, who wishes in this way to thank all who have so kindly helped her family in any way since their loss by fire. AND Miss Oril Smith's school at Salt Springs closes on Thursday of this week. The one at the Forks on Thursday of next week,

 

Hopbottom - E.M. Tiffany is erecting a Windmill to force water in the attic to supply bathroom and hot and cold water through his house.

 

Brooklyn - It was an error in our last week's items to report the death of Ralph Stephens, occurring on the suspension bridge at Niagara. He was assistant superintendent in a paper mill and while mending a belt on Sunday night, the machinery started and caught him, carrying him over the wheels, causing instant death. He was 21 years old.

 

Montrose - The following dinner will be served at the Tarbell House, Sunday, March 23, at 1:00 P.M., at 35 cents for town and country people; children under 5 years, 25 cents. Exclusive table and service for families or parties when notified in advance. Menu: Oysters Raw, Soup, French Vegetables, Fish, Olives, Radishes, Pickles, Stewed Chicken (With Biscuits), Sirloin of Beef With Yorkshire Pudding, Spinach, Mashed and Sweet Potatoes, Boston Cream Cakes, Fruit Salad, Stewed Tomatoes, Fried Parsnips, Apple, Mince and Pumpkin Pie, Vanilla Ice Cream with Cake, Edam and Ames Cheese, Wafers, Coffee, Fruit, Nuts.

 

Brookdale, Liberty Twp. - Barnett J. LaSure died at Brookdale on Wednesday morning of consumption. He was one of the first volunteers in this county, enlisting in June '61, and serving continuously until the close of the war. He was a prisoner with Gen. Robert E. Lee when the latter surrendered at Appomattox. [He] Was wounded in the head on Oct. 15, 1864. His age was about 63 years. Funeral was attended from the house at 12 o'clock, noon, today.

 

Hallstead - The sixth anniversary of the Methodist church was celebrated Sunday. Rev. A.D. Decker, of Union, spoke in the morning and a note against the church was burned at this service.

 

Dimock - Thomas Calby will remove with his family to Montrose this spring, having sold his farm to Mrs. Cope. He has previously kept city boarders, summers, and will prepare to entertain them in Montrose. AND The sugar season is not very good this year.

 

Springville - W.E. Lott has purchased the old creamery and will convert it into a dwelling.

 

Harford - News was recently received of the death of John S. Carpenter, of Chicago, youngest brother of Mrs. Betsey Darrow.

 

Ararat - The baby of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Rogers was fatally burned recently. The child was playing in front of a stove in which a charcoal fire was burning, when an explosion of gas forced the doors open and threw live coals upon the child, igniting its clothing. The mother quickly removed the child's clothing, but it was badly burned that [the baby] died the next day.

 

Fair Hill - Quite a number were present at the aid society, which met with Mrs. G.L. Lewis last Thursday. Quilting was the order of the day. The next meeting will be at the home of Mrs. Harry Valentine, on Thursday, March 27th.

 

Elk Lake - J. Estus and son have built them a new drag saw for sawing wood, which runs by steam and are cutting wood for the creamery; any one wanting wood cut will do well to call on them.

 

Oakley - Maple sugar is the dessert just now; everybody seems to be ready to eat.

 

Friendsville - The robins and blue birds are singing; fine weather for March.

 

Flynn, Middletown Twp. - Miss S.E. Robertson, teacher of the Triangle school, has closed a successful term.

 

Forest City - The culmination of the sensational marriage of Phoebe Gesenator, of Carbondale, and a young man named Crandall, of Uniondale, will probably be in the arrest of the young men who conceived the idea of the joke. Rev. J.F. Brodhead, who performed the ceremony, is very indignant over the affair, and announced his intention of bringing suit against the persons who are responsible. Carndall recently returned from three years' soldiering in the Philippines, and had a large roll of bills when he landed in Forest City. Phoebe Gesenator met Crandall and his roll. According to the story, she finally proposed marriage and he was willing and the two looked around for someone to help them out. Cecil Manzer, it is said, acted as best man and Miss Helen Dennere was bridesmaid. When the circumstances were made known great indignation was expressed. The young men who assisted at the marriage ceremony state that they understood that it was nothing but a joke on the young man. After the ceremony had been performed, Phoebe, it is said, skipped out with the roll, leaving her new husband to mourn its loss.

 

News Brief - The Lackawanna Railroad Company is about to test a new headlight, by which, it is claimed, engineers may locate other trains several miles away and behind hills, if they are not too high. A powerful electric arc light is to be placed in the position occupied by the ordinary headlight, and in addition to lighting the track distinctly for half a mile ahead, it will throw a verticle [vertical] beam as large as a man's body high into the air above the engine. This ray of light can be seen a long distance away in the darkness, and will herald the approach of the train some time before the ordinary headlight would become visible. In a hilly country where the road continually curves, it is expected to be especially valuable. The light is sustained by a powerful dynamo, run by a steam motor, all of which will occupy little more space than an ordinary kerosene headlight.

 

March 27 (1902/2002)

 

 

Brookdale - The relatives and friends met with Mr. and Mrs. A. Fish to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary, it being a surprise. Mr. Fish was away but returned in time for dinner. Had some grand music on organ and violin.

 

Auburn Corners - Some friends of J.W. Smith helped him celebrate his 80th birthday March 17th. The surprise was complete. AND Catherine (Beardsley) Whitaker, widow of C.H. Whitaker and one of the oldest residents of Susquehanna county, passed peacefully to her reward March 20. She was born in Middletown [Twp.], Pa., Aug. 12, 1804. Her parents were among the pioneers in that locality and in early life she was subject to the toils and privations and dangers of frontier life. She was the last of nine brothers and sisters. She was the mother of seven children, four of them preceding her to the spirit world, and at the time of her death there were thirty-six grandchildren and thirty-one great-grandchildren.

 

Elk Lake - S.A. Young is building a house for the Scranton sporting club.

 

Montrose - Anne Wheatley, familiarly known as "Auntie" Wheatley, one of our oldest colored citizens, died this morning at 3 o'clock at her late residence. Death was due to old age. Just what her age was is not known, but it is believed that she was well toward the century mark. Her daughter, Mary, and a grand daughter, Mrs. Slaughter, survive her. AND A new memorial window in the chancel of St. Paul Episcopal Church, the gift of Mrs. Daniel Sayre in memory of her mother, will, it is expected, be installed by Tiffany & Company, N.Y., by Easter.

 

Birchardville - Randolph Turrell has one of the best plants for the manufacture of the finest maple sugar and syrup. He has 500 trees tapped, [and] one of the latest, improved evaporators, keeps everything connected with his plant scrupulously neat, and puts up his syrup in a 1 qt. glass cans, thus avoiding the possibility of rust and dirt, so common where tin is used year after year. We are told that the quality of Mr. Turrell's syrup is superior to all other makes, but the printers are expert judges of anything in the maple syrup line, and are awaiting an opportunity to test for themselves the quality of Mr. Turrell's product.

 

Steven's Point - It is reported that bluestone quarrymen at Steven's Point have discovered traces of coal.

 

Rush - A fine new organ has been placed in the M.E. church. AND Miss Minnie Woods and Mr. Oscar Hardic, both highly esteemed young people, were united in marriage last Wednesday evening.

 

Thompson - Lynn Spencer, of the Spencer Steam Heater Company, went to Chautauqua, Monday, to place a heater in a large boarding house.

 

Susquehanna - There is a rumor that the Binghamton Street Railway will be extended through to Susquehanna and Lanesboro, using water power from the electric plant to be established at Lanesboro.

 

Welsh Hill - Eber Burns, of Elkdale, was circulating a petition through this place last Monday requesting that a rural free delivery route be established, the proposed route to run from Uniondale to Tresco, thence to Tirzah, thence to Welsh Hill and back to Uniondale by way of Elkdale, covering a distance of about 20 miles and delivering mail once a day to all families on the route. Nearly everyone signed the petition and it is hoped the Postoffice Department will grant the request.

 

Springville - Ziba Lott, who underwent an operation for appendicitis at the hospital at Sayre, came out successfully.

 

Jackson - Dr. Cole, of Jackson, who has an extensive tract of land in the South, will take a number of Jackson, Starrucca and Susquehanna people south to locate next summer, it is reported.

 

Glenwood - Mrs. Goss is elevating her chickery above [the] high water mark, as the late floods came near drowning her hens. They were imprisoned for two or three days. AND D.N. Hardy entertained a company on Saturday evening to a warm sugar social. D.N. is [a] genial good fellow, a boy with the boys and a man among men.

 

Fairdale - H.B. Downer will move to Binghamton about the first of April. Sorry Len is going away. Jessup will miss a good citizen. He has bought a milk route. AND Read Very moved his household goods to Montrose on Monday and shipped them to Pittston where he expects to take up his residence for the present. He is another good boy gone. At that rate how long will it take to clean us out of good fellows?

 

Brooklyn - Mrs. Isadore McKinney died at her home Feb. 12, 1902, age 53 years. The intimate relation long held by our deceased sister with the members of Lieut. Rogers' Post, No. 143, G.A.R., render it proper that we should place on record our appreciation of her active and zealous work in all matters of interest connected with the Post. Sister McKinney's father, Lemuel Richards, two brothers, Charles and Joseph Richards, and her husband, E.N. McKinney, were all soldiers in the Civil War, and her son, Harry, was a soldier in our late war.

 

News Briefs - The furniture factory of G.N. Johnson & Son, at LeRaysville, recently destroyed by fire, will be rebuilt. AND "Big Jim," the Ross Park bear, woke up and came out of his hole in Binghamton a few days ago, after enjoying a snooze of 117 days. AND While over in Iowa last week we learned that every farmer who had a wire fence owned his private telephone line. The top wire on the fences are connected by running a wire on the poles across roads and gateways, thereby connecting one farm with another. The expense is inconsequential.It has also been demonstrated that telegraph wires can be used for telephone purpose without any interference or interruption whatever, one with the other. The wire can be used for both purposes at the same time. [Kearney Democrat] AND Gov. Stone has issued a proclamation designating April 4th and 18th as Arbor days. The proclamation stated that the recent floods show the need of forest preservation in Pennsylvania.

 

April 04 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - In St. Rose's Convent in Carbondale, on Tuesday, the following from Susquehanna professed-Bessie Condon, Sister Roberta; Anna Griffin, Sr. Generosa; the following took the white veil-Della Hurley, Sr. Josepha; Jennie Moran, Sr. Anysia; Lizzie Maloney, Sr. Dolorita. Rev. Father Brodrick and a delegation of relatives were present.

 

Rush - Easter services were held at the Baptist church on Sunday morning. The church was very prettily decorated with house plants and laurel; a beautiful Easter lily was much admired. Mr. Hughes preached a strong sermon.

 

Franklin Forks - Joah Frudd, an aged resident, died Friday, March 21. About a week before, he got a sliver in his little finger and in a day or two blood poison set in from which he died. The funeral was held on March 23 from the Methodist church. He had lived in this place a good many years and he leaves a son and three daughters.

 

Gibson - A meeting of the stockholders of the Gibson Telephone Co. will be held Tuesday evening at 7:30 P.M. All stockholders are required to be present.

 

Montrose -The following description of our village was found among the papers of the late Lorenzo Lyons, and is dated March 2nd 1838. "Montrose has a Court House and jail; two school houses, one of which is called the academy; a fire-proof, an engine house, three churches, four taverns, three printing offices, one book store, one drug store, ten other stores, a postoffice, a book bindery, a watch maker's, a hatter's shop, two tin shops, three cabinet makers, three shoemakers, four blacksmiths, two wagon shops, one furnace, two harness and trunk shops, two cooper shops, three tailors, three milliners, four doctors, six lawyers, two Justices of the Peace. It has a total of 210 buildings, 82 of which are dwelling houses, and 90 barns. The population is nearly 1000." The above is certainly interesting and worthy of close attention. We note some industries then existing of which we cannot now boast. Somewhat chagrined to note just as many printing offices then as now. And behold, there were four hotels. Lawyers made a fair showing even in those days. We rejoice over one highly encouraging symptom-the dwelling houses now far outnumber the barns.

 

Crystal Lake - The old cars, which were used on the Gravity [Rail] Road, near Honesdale, are being bought up by different parties who will fix them up as summer cottages, to be placed on the shores of Wayne county's numerous lakes. The cars sell for $10 and up. Crystal Lake will have several for those wishing comfortable quarters at moderate rates.

 

Brooklyn - Miss Jennie Weston died March 29, 1902, in the Methodist Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn, N.Y., where she graduated as a nurse in March 1898. Everything that skill and loving care could do to prolong her life was done, but the heart condition was too serious and of too long standing to yield more than temporarily to any treatment. She died as she had lived, bright, cheerful and thoughtful to the last of others, rather than self.

 

Bridgewater Twp. -While coming from Susquehanna yesterday, Herbert Buckley, Joseph Kendrick and Mr. Dondon met with an accident near the residence of Al. Sturdevant. Coming down the hill, the king-bolt of their carriage broke, throwing the occupants from the wagon and the team ran away. Mr. Buckley, driving, endeavored to hold the team and was dragged some distance. The team passed through Montrose at a fierce rate, running toward Fairdale and were caught near Ackley Tyler's place. Mr. Kendrick followed the team on foot as far as Montrose and Fred Ingraham took a rig and went after the team. Mr. Buckley was badly cut about the face. The wagon was badly shattered. The horses escaped with a few marks.

 

Uniondale - Plans are on foot among some of our leading citizens to establish a free library in our town. Let the good work go on.

 

Lanesboro - We are informed that Mr. and Mrs. Comfort, Charles E. McCoy, Esq., Mr. and Mrs. Fred Tarbox and others, will on Thursday next, leave for Central City, Colorado, where they will in the future reside.

 

Franklin Forks - A letter received last night from Mr. Cleveland, who is coming from western Pennsylvania to put down an oil well here, states that he had one car of machinery loaded, and was loading another, and would be here in a few days. Col. Courtright looks for him any day now.

 

Hallstead - The place formerly owned by W.D. Lusk, known as the Lamb drug store, has been bought by W.J. McLeod and is now being overhauled and will be used as a shirt factory and laundry combined. AND Dan McGuire was injured at Conklin in trying to jump from one moving train to another. He was taken to Binghamton and had an arm, which was badly mangled, amputated.

 

Shannon Hill, Auburn Twp. - The Shannon Hill M.E. church will be dedicated April 8. Morning session will commence at 10:30. Dinner will be served free to all by the ladies in the basement of the church. Afternoon service will commence at 2:30. Two very fine bed quilts will be sold to the highest bidder, one containing the names of 400 persons who have contributed to the fund.

 

Harford - Telephone meeting Monday evening at G.L. Payne's store.

 

Lake View - At about one o'clock A.M., March 26, fire was discovered in the saw mill of Chas. Boyden, located near Lake View, and in spite of all efforts the entire mill was consumed. There was but slight damage to machinery and the estimated loss will not exceed $200. There was no insurance.

 

News Brief - Don't leave your lighted lamp half turned down in the house at night. The New York board of health has just declared that it is the greatest known breeder of diphtheria. Nothing so poisons the air of a room as the fumes from a smoking lamp.

 

April 10 (1902/2002)

 

 

South Gibson - Graduating exercises passed off nicely. The following young ladies received diplomas-Constance and Genevieve Fallon and Mabel Fuller.

 

Jackson - Monroe Walker is improving his place by removing the old blacksmith shop.

 

New Milford - New Milford basket ball team defeated the North Side team of Binghamton in a hard played game, Tuesday evening, by a score of 36-22 Herrick

 

Centre - Prof. Manning and his assistants, Sarah Jennings and Elizabeth Bowell, closed a successful term of school here, Thursday. The students gave a very interesting program in the afternoon.

 

Susquehanna - Stephen Maroney has been appointed Street Commissioner and George Smith, policeman. Wm. Allpaugh has been re-elected Borough Treasurer and Thomas A. Doherty, Esq., has been re-elected Borough Attorney.

 

Dundaff - They are making arrangements at Fern Hall for a large business the coming season. Mrs. C.E. Johnson will have charge, which is enough to satisfy us that nothing will be left undone to make it pleasant and comfortable for her guests.

 

Transue - Our school has closed. We have the oldest school house in the township; it was first built in 1860. Don't it look as if we needed a better one.

 

Rush - The Young People of the Baptist church will have a Poverty social at the home of Mrs. S.B. Stark on Tuesday evening, April 15. Those not wishing to pay fines must not wear the following articles-jewelry, silk waists, patent leather shoes, neckties, gold spectacles or white shirts. There will be a heavy fine for flirting. The two persons wearing the poorest clothes will be given prizes. North

 

Bridgewater - C.E. Tyler opened his iron mine last August: there is some prospect of gold, too.

 

Brooklyn (Lindaville) - Frances, a little girl of ten years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Rogers, died suddenly of heart failure on Thursday of last week, near her home in Brooklyn township. She had just returned from school, and while running to her father in the field, fell forward to the ground. She never recovered consciousness and expired in her father's arms. It is very remarkable that a child so young should be stricken by heart disease and makes her loss to the parents and friends more keenly felt.

 

Welsh Hill - Arbor Day will be observed at Welsh Hill by the school pupils and other planting trees upon the parsonage grounds.

 

Gibson - E.H. Sweet has a fine new $50 cornet. The band is now ready to meet all engagements.

 

Montrose - "Jack the hugger" is a creature known in various localities throughout the country, but it was not until one evening last week that two of the species made their public appearance in Montrose and they straightway came to grief. The two "Jacks" had been "bending the elbow" more frequently than was wise and they then sallied forth upon the Avenue and rashly attempted to embrace feminine passers-by, but their amusement was brought to an abrupt close by Officer Tingley, and the "huggers" were unceremoniously lugged off, placed in durance vile, and subsequently required to part with a goodly pile of coins of the realm. They departed for their homes sadder, but wiser men. There is no room in Montrose for "Jack the hugger" or any of his kind.

 

Lathrop - Tiffany & Carlucci recently commenced work in the quarries on the old Horace Bell farm near Hopbottom. ALSO: Peter Winnie has opened a quarry near this quarry. The stone business is booming near Hopbottom, also along the Narrow Gauge road, through Springville.

 

Clifford - E.S.Green sowed a half acre of onions, March 31, between snow squalls.

 

Glenwood - J.B. Swartz met with an accident which came very near being serious. He was thrown from a wagon by the acts of a horse, which became frightened by the cars. In falling he sustained a fracture of the shoulder, a bruised leg, and head coming in contact with a stone, which made him feel foolish for a time, but he is doing nicely and on the road to a speedy recovery. He is attended by Dr. Decker, of Nicholson. AND There is talk of having a starch factory here in the near future. If the rumor should prove true, this quaint old town would be of some use to Susquehanna county.

 

Springville - Stephen Tuttle, our worthy postmaster, has moved his office, confectionery, etc., down to his furniture store and near his own residence-a very sensible move on his part, but a little out of the heart of the city. [Stephen is also the undertaker].

 

Thomson - Mrs. E.P. Strong has purchased two beautiful pieces of horn furniture, a chair and hall rack of F.D. Wrighter. Mr. W. has made many handsome horn ornaments and furniture.

 

News Briefs - An effort is to be made to have all the schools in this State amend the spelling of the twelve words: program, tho, although, thoro, thorofare, thru, throughout, catalog, prolog, decolog, demagog, pedagog. It is said to be recommended to the members of school boards by the American Philological Societies. The new spelling is now used in publications of the National Educational Assoc. AND We are informed by a fashion article in our exchanges that the shirtwaist man, this summer, will have a new safeguard for keeping his pantaloons on, as no suspenders or belts are fashionable. The tailors have put on an extra backstrap, only they will be side straps-one over each hip. The idiotic custom of having breeches made so long that they must be turned up on the south end will still prevail.

 

April 17 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - Since the recent floods several Indian arrow points, made of flint, have been found upon Beebe's Flats, which was once a noted Indian camping ground. Also, in Beebe Park, Messrs, Kendrick and Ginty, managers of the new baseball club, are repairing the damage done to the diamond by the recent floods.

 

Elk Lake - Charles Henry is blowing stumps off his lot, and is preparing to build a large cottage. AND Our school closed the 8th, with an entertainment consisting of dialogues and recitations, after which the scholars presented their teacher, Miss Mae Porter, with a very nice water set.

 

Harford - The G.A.R. and friends had a bee on Saturday. The cannon was mounted and the ground around it leveled.

 

Lenox - There occurred Wednesday night, March 19th, the death of little Johnny Hanyon, at the home of his grandfather-Geo. Felton. He was of a bright, genial disposition; beloved by all of his little schoolmates, and his death will be greatly felt. Just before he died he made the remark that he could not stay very long, for he was going to see his father who had gone on before to meet his God. His age was six years; he leaves a mother, five brothers and two sisters to mourn his death.

 

Middletown - A very pretty wedding was solemnized in St. Patrick's Church on Wednesday morning last, when Miss Maggie Golden, a popular young lady of that place, was led to the marriage altar by Mr. Michael J. Curley, of New York City. The ceremony was performed by the bride's pastor, Rev. Father Bartholomew V. Driscoll, of Friends-ville. After the ceremony a reception was tendered the happy wedded pair at the home of the bride's father, Martin Golden, Sr., to which a very large number of guests were present, from New York, Montrose, Silver Lake, Binghamton, and other places. Mr. & Mrs. Curley have the best wishes of a host of friends. They will reside in New York.

 

Montrose - Emily C. Blackman, author of the History of Susquehanna County, writes "The article reporting Montrose 64 years ago, revives my own knowledge of it and as it was two years earlier. The academy where I did my first teaching as an assistant; the "fire-proof" Commissioners' office, not far from the present site of the Rough & Ready stone building; the third printing office that of the Spectator, of which seldom fail to think when passing the corner opposite and east of Cooley's hardware store, for the office was in the basement of which there remains a part plainly seen-the stone masonry; the fourth hotel below the present Exchange; the book store of B.R. Lyons; the bindery of N.H. Lyons, the drug store of N. Mitchell, the watchmaker's shop of G.V. Bentley, the hatter, C.W. Tuttle, the tin-shop of Bennett & Marsh, the cabinet makers, Ethridge & Eldrige; Frink's blacksmith shop, Mack's wagon shop. D. Post's furnace, Baldwin's harness shop, Dennis' gun shop, Fordham's cooper shop, the tailor shop of the man of greatest weight in town. Doctors Park and Blackman, lawyers Read, Jessup, Case & Post, 'Squire Raynsford-these are among those I distinctly remember."

 

Welsh Hill, Clifford Twp. - Our new postmaster, Jerry T. Evans, has arrived in town, accompanied by his two children, his goods having been brought by team from Dalton.

 

Thompson - The Susquehanna water company has purchased Comfort's pond, a natural body of water in the township.

 

Forest City - An important real estate deal took place this week by reason of which Forest City will lose one of its highly respected families. George H. Ledyard has purchased of T.C. Manzer the well-known Manzer homestead near South Gibson and will move to that place as soon as the weather settles. The farm is well stocked and provided with ample barns and one of the finest houses in that section of the county. The consideration is said to be $7000.

 

Jackson - The North American contained a cut of the 42 men recently graduated from the State college dairy and creamery school. One of this number, E.G. Lamb, was from Jackson township, and now has charge of a creamery at Goshen, Pa.

 

Friendsville - The funeral of Daniel Cary was held at Friendsville, April 4th. AND Andrew Minehan has rented the Carmalt farm for the coming year.

 

Springville - It was recently rumored that the hotel at Springville had been sold by Mr. Rodney, but the sale fell through. But now it has been purchased by Joseph Kelly, of Montrose, who expects to take possession about April 20th. Jo is a popular young man of good business ability and ought to be able to make a go of it. The fact that there is no Mrs. Kelly to act as landlady, does not necessarily mean that there never will be one. Later - As will be seen by reference to our marriage column, Joseph married Miss Mary Neville, of Little Meadows, on April 16th.

 

Uniondale - W.F. Churchill was in Uniondale recently and took back a load of Stromberg phones for the Tresco line. Connected are W.E. Reader, John Jones, B.N. Lyons, Giles Lyons, Ira Reader, L.H. Reynolds, A. M. Williams and W.F. Churchill.

 

Hopbottom - An interesting programme was given by the graduating class of the high school at the Universalist church, April 14. The class consists of six members: Georgianna Tiffany, Margaret Mahar, Mabel Jeffers, Edna Brown, John Sager and Lyman Kellum.

 

Franklin Twp. - On the last day of March 1902, about 3 o'clock in the morning, there were two would be young gentlemen who came from toward Upsonville, going toward the Baker school house, screaming so that they awoke all the inmates of nearby dwellings and scaring the children badly. In so doing they laid themselves liable to prosecution and it would be giving them good advice not to repeat it.

 

News Brief - The city newspapers report a revival of bicycle riding, and say the "glorious sport" bids fair to become very popular again. Manufacturers claim they are having a far better business than last year, and the bicycle supply houses are in the field with more elaborate catalogues than ever before. There is no change in the price of standard wheels, which is thought low enough, but there will be any number of cheap wheels on the market at different grades of goodness, for leaner purses.

 

April 25 (1902/2002)

 

 

Springville - A road is to be built in Springville from Theron Strickland's up through his fields, crossing I.A. Strickland's, Nelson Fike's and Mrs. Helen M. Root's land, taking in several stone quarries in its course, besides getting around two very hard hills. The road will be a much-needed public improvement. AND We are sorry to lose our pastor, Mr. Custard, for he was loved by all who knew him; but we hope to like the new one as well.

 

Montrose - Jacob Titman caught 183 bullheads at Jones Lake [Lake Montrose] the other day. AND It is unlawful to catch more than 50 brook trout in one day. It is also unlikely-except in your mind. AND A.W. Lyons bought W.A. Harrington's team of donkeys this week for use on his delivery wagon. These little animals are noted for their strength and endurance, qualities which are necessary in his business on account of the numerous customers to whom goods must be delivered. The old horse, which has faithfully served many years, has been sold.

 

Brooklyn - "Joe" Tewksbury, Brooklyn's pleasing tonsorial artist, has a violin which he lately made, which is favorably commented upon. We congratulate "Joe" upon his fine success.

 

South Montrose - M.L. Lake was in town the other day and among other interesting things he informed us that a sheep belonging to Alvah Allen, recently gave birth to 6 lambs and that another one a short time before gave birth to 5 lambs. We think South Montrose the greatest place we ever heard of, for lambs, or for yarns. But upon further consideration and well knowing the reliability of Mr. Lake and Mr. Allen, (we know nothing as to the sheep) we are satisfied the statement is correct, and that it constitutes a record of remarkable fecundity.

 

East Rush - Willie Yost's brother-in-law came up from Philadelphia to see him. It had been some time since Willie had seen any of his people, except one brother, as the Aid brought him from Philadelphia when he was a small boy

 

Susquehanna - Ping-pong has struck Susquehanna. AND At Erie Hose Company's Fair, May 19-23, the barbers of Susquehanna, Oakland and Lanesboro will contest for a barber's chair.

 

Birchardville - D. Fred Birchard was seen on our streets Monday afternoon, with what seemed at first to be a whole menagerie, but upon a closer look proved only to be 16 rats all in one trap and captured in a very short time, in his hen house.

 

New Milford - The Lestershire basket ball team will play the home team on Friday evening, at the Opera House.

 

Gibson - Fire recently destroyed the farm house of the late J. Gillett, near Smiley. AND In Scranton, April 24th, occurred the death of Vinnie, wife of W.G. Conrad, formerly of this place, till their marriage 12 years ago. The husband and one daughter, Ruth, survive her. Services conducted by her pastor, Rev. Dr. Griffin, of Elm Park Church, were very largely attended at her late home on Colfax Ave., Saturday, April 26. She was the daughter of Mrs. Wm. Maxey of this place, who was with her at her death. The sad scene at the services was one we read of but seldom see. Lying in the beautiful couch casket, surrounded by flowers, was the wife, and resting in her arm, the infant daughter for whose little life she gave her own, which had opened its eyes to this earth on Thursday morning and on Saturday, closed them to this earth and returned to God. The family is prostrate with grief, but we can offer the consolation of the Heavenly Father, and the deepest sympathy of their friends here.

 

Brandt - E.J. Matthews, of Susquehanna, is building a very large vault in the Brandt cemetery for the Kessler family. It is a fine piece of work.

 

Clifford - T.J. Wells has purchased the Grange store building. Consideration $400. Bennett and Rivenburg have purchased of T.J. Wells the corner store building. Consideration $800.

 

Brookdale - L.A. Tingley shot a fish hawk, last Tuesday evening, that measured over five feet from tip to tip.

 

Jackson - County surveyor, L.D. Benson, is connecting his residence in Jackson by telephone, with New Milford, Susquehanna, and other points in eastern Susquehanna county.

 

Glenwood - The Hon. G.A. Grow made a short visit in town last week, and distributed seeds in this section of the vineyard.

 

Dimock - The new [horse] sheds at the Methodist church are now finished. The gentlemen who assisted in their erection deserve much credit.

 

News Brief - Of the ministers of the Wyoming Conference there are 42 who last year received less than $600 salary, 141 more who received less than $1000, twelve who got between $1000 and $1200, thirteen between $1200 and $1500, eight between $1500 and $2000, three between $2000 and $2500 and one who gets $3000 and one $4000. AND Every day during March and April, the Erie R.R. will sell tickets from Carbondale, PA to Ogden, Salt Lake City, Helena, and Butte for $46. To Spokane for $46.50. To Portland, Tacoma, Seattle, Vancouver, San Francisco, Sacramento, Los Angeles, San Diego, for $49.00. Rates from Susquehanna are 85 cents, from Great Bend $1.15 and from Binghamton $1.55 lower than the Carbondale fares. Tickets on sale via all routes. Erie is the only road in this section running tourist sleeping cars.

 

May 01 (1902/2002)

 

 

Elk Lake - Our Dimock stage driver, Canfield Estus, has purchased a large wagon which he will use for the accommodation of passengers. AND The clubhouse of the Elk Lake gunning club is nearly completed, under the management of S.A. Young.

 

Harford - The Harvey S. Rice Post will observe Decoration Day. They will meet at Odd Fellows' Hall at 1 o'clock, march to the cemetery and decorate the soldiers' graves, then return to the hall where there will be a program of music and speaking. AND The graduating exercises of the Harford graded school were held in the Congregational church last Friday evening. The church was beautifully decorated and the exercises exceptionally fine. There were nine graduates: Paul Corse, John Bailey, William Sherwood, Normah Darrow, Charlottie Stearns, Maud Wilcox, Velma Little, Ethel Tiffany, Lizzie Esterbrook.

 

Susquehanna - Cards have been received by friends in this place announcing the marriage of Mr. William Arthur Skinner, a well-known and prominent attorney of Susquehanna, to Miss Grace Madge Burrhus, a popular and accomplished young lady, also of Susquehanna, the ceremony taking place on Wednesday, April 30, 1902. [B.F. (Burrhus Frederick) Skinner, the noted behavioral psychologist, was the son of William and Grace.] AND Jesse Westervelt, of this place, a soldier of the Spanish-American war, has been granted a pension of $6 per month for a wound in the face, received in a battle in China. AND Wm. E. Kelly, of Montrose, on Friday evening graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College, and for a time, will located in this place with his brother, Dr. J.D. Kelly.

 

Franklin Forks - The work of drilling at Salt Springs is progressing finely; hope in another week to be able to chronicle houses all lit up with natural gas.

 

Lenoxville - The firm of Miller & Brownell are now ready to supply their friends with groceries and provisions.

 

Birchardville - On Monday evening the old soldiers and citizens met at the church to make arrangements for Decoration Day. The following committees were appointed-Committee on speaker, Asa Warner, C.E. Fessenden; on music, Mrs. J.S. Hosford, May Birchard, Emma Melhuish, Fannie Boyd; on flowers, Mrs. F.S. Bolles, Mrs. A.J. McKeeby, Mrs. G.B. Strange, Mrs. E. Slauson, Mrs. F.H. Ball, Mrs. I. Melhuish, Mrs. M.E. Birchard, Flora and Amy Ball, Emma Melhuish and Effie Southwell. The floral committee are requested to gather what flowers they can and meet at the hall on the afternoon of May 29, to make wreaths and arrange the flowers. Let the people turn out and help to decorate the graves of our fallen heroes.

 

South Montrose - Preparations have commenced on the Ballentine farm toward erecting the summer residence there.

 

Lakeside - Anyone wishing to buy a two-seated market wagon would do well to call on Mrs. John Oliver, Lakeside.

 

Hallstead - The remains of Merritt Monell were brought from Owego on Tuesday and buried at Hasbrouck cemetery. He was killed while boarding a train. He leaves a wife and 8 children, a mother, 2 brothers and 3 sisters.

 

Honesdale - James Henry Sutton, aged 86 years, died at his home in Honesdale, April 30. He was born near Snake Creek, this county, on April 28, 1817, and for several years worked at the tinsmith's trade in this place. The entire family, consisting of 12 members, became octogenarians, with but one exception, a son who was accidentally killed.

 

Montrose - As announced in our last issue, the east window of the Central Drug Store was lighted on Tuesday evening by natural gas from the promising oil field in Franklin township. The gas burned freely and with intense heat, proving beyond a possibility of doubt that it is the genuine article. Much interest was manifested in the test and the Central Drug Store was thronged with a curious crowd for several hours.

 

Springville - Miss Mabel Pritchard began a two months' select school in the Academy on May 5th. AND Anna Barnes Stevens has bought out Mrs. Paxton's (nee Grattan) millinery, etc., and continues in the business at her own home and opposite the M.E. church, and at the old stand. She will be remembered, and it will be a pleasure to many that she has again taken up the business. Dress goods and dressmaking will be in connection with the millinery.

 

Uniondale - It looks as if Mr. Frank Westgate was prepared to satisfy the wants of anyone wishing any kind of farming tools, he has just got in one carload of Adriance Buckeye mowers, reapers, plows, harrows, cultivators, lumber wagons &c, he has some of those 1000 mile axle buggies that are dandies. Boys, where is your girl.

 

Forest Lake - Bessie and Essie McKeeby expect to go to Delhi about the middle of this month, where they will have work in a silk mill.

 

Lestershire (Johnson City, NY) - It is now asserted that the rumors that Lestershire is to have another immense shoe factory are to be confirmed. J.E. Tilt, the great Chicago shoe manufacturer, has formed a $4,000,000 company and will erect one of the largest factories in the worked there, on which work is to be commenced at once.

 

New Milford - A.C. Barrett, Esq., a prominent aspirant to legislative honors, subject to the action of the Republican convention, was a welcome caller at this office, the Independent Republican, Montrose

 

News Briefs: Straw hats and barefooted boys are gradually making their appearance. AND A recent State law requires that the loose stones shall be removed from the highways once a month from April to October in each year. Road supervisors should see that this is done. AND There's a fortune in store for the man who invents a garden spade that will seem as light to a boy when he is preparing an onion bed as when he is digging for fish worms. AND Forepaugh & Sells' big circus will be at Wilkes-Barre May 19. It is the largest show now in existence.

 

May 08 (1902/2002)

 

 

Elk Lake - Our Dimock stage driver, Canfield Estus, has purchased a large wagon which he will use for the accommodation of passengers. AND The clubhouse of the Elk Lake gunning club is nearly completed, under the management of S.A. Young.

 

Harford - The Harvey S. Rice Post will observe Decoration Day. They will meet at Odd Fellows' Hall at 1 o'clock, march to the cemetery and decorate the soldiers' graves, then return to the hall where there will be a program of music and speaking. AND The graduating exercises of the Harford graded school were held in the Congregational church last Friday evening. The church was beautifully decorated and the exercises exceptionally fine. There were nine graduates: Paul Corse, John Bailey, William Sherwood, Normah Darrow, Charlottie Stearns, Maud Wilcox, Velma Little, Ethel Tiffany, Lizzie Esterbrook.

 

Susquehanna - Cards have been received by friends in this place announcing the marriage of Mr. William Arthur Skinner, a well-known and prominent attorney of Susquehanna, to Miss Grace Madge Burrhus, a popular and accomplished young lady, also of Susquehanna, the ceremony taking place on Wednesday, April 30, 1902. [B.F. (Burrhus Frederick) Skinner, the noted behavioral psychologist, was the son of William and Grace.] AND Jesse Westervelt, of this place, a soldier of the Spanish-American war, has been granted a pension of $6 per month for a wound in the face, received in a battle in China. AND Wm. E. Kelly, of Montrose, on Friday evening graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College, and for a time, will located in this place with his brother, Dr. J.D. Kelly.

 

Franklin Forks - The work of drilling at Salt Springs is progressing finely; hope in another week to be able to chronicle houses all lit up with natural gas.

 

Lenoxville - The firm of Miller & Brownell are now ready to supply their friends with groceries and provisions.

 

Birchardville - On Monday evening the old soldiers and citizens met at the church to make arrangements for Decoration Day. The following committees were appointed-Committee on speaker, Asa Warner, C.E. Fessenden; on music, Mrs. J.S. Hosford, May Birchard, Emma Melhuish, Fannie Boyd; on flowers, Mrs. F.S. Bolles, Mrs. A.J. McKeeby, Mrs. G.B. Strange, Mrs. E. Slauson, Mrs. F.H. Ball, Mrs. I. Melhuish, Mrs. M.E. Birchard, Flora and Amy Ball, Emma Melhuish and Effie Southwell. The floral committee are requested to gather what flowers they can and meet at the hall on the afternoon of May 29, to make wreaths and arrange the flowers. Let the people turn out and help to decorate the graves of our fallen heroes.

 

South Montrose - Preparations have commenced on the Ballentine farm toward erecting the summer residence there.

 

Lakeside - Anyone wishing to buy a two-seated market wagon would do well to call on Mrs. John Oliver, Lakeside.

 

Hallstead - The remains of Merritt Monell were brought from Owego on Tuesday and buried at Hasbrouck cemetery. He was killed while boarding a train. He leaves a wife and 8 children, a mother, 2 brothers and 3 sisters.

 

Honesdale - James Henry Sutton, aged 86 years, died at his home in Honesdale, April 30. He was born near Snake Creek, this county, on April 28, 1817, and for several years worked at the tinsmith's trade in this place. The entire family, consisting of 12 members, became octogenarians, with but one exception, a son who was accidentally killed.

 

Montrose - As announced in our last issue, the east window of the Central Drug Store was lighted on Tuesday evening by natural gas from the promising oil field in Franklin township. The gas burned freely and with intense heat, proving beyond a possibility of doubt that it is the genuine article. Much interest was manifested in the test and the Central Drug Store was thronged with a curious crowd for several hours.

 

Springville - Miss Mabel Pritchard began a two months' select school in the Academy on May 5th. AND Anna Barnes Stevens has bought out Mrs. Paxton's (nee Grattan) millinery, etc., and continues in the business at her own home and opposite the M.E. church, and at the old stand. She will be remembered, and it will be a pleasure to many that she has again taken up the business. Dress goods and dressmaking will be in connection with the millinery.

 

Uniondale - It looks as if Mr. Frank Westgate was prepared to satisfy the wants of anyone wishing any kind of farming tools, he has just got in one carload of Adriance Buckeye mowers, reapers, plows, harrows, cultivators, lumber wagons &c, he has some of those 1000 mile axle buggies that are dandies. Boys, where is your girl.

 

Forest Lake - Bessie and Essie McKeeby expect to go to Delhi about the middle of this month, where they will have work in a silk mill.

 

Lestershire (Johnson City, NY) - It is now asserted that the rumors that Lestershire is to have another immense shoe factory are to be confirmed. J.E. Tilt, the great Chicago shoe manufacturer, has formed a $4,000,000 company and will erect one of the largest factories in the worked there, on which work is to be commenced at once.

 

New Milford - A.C. Barrett, Esq., a prominent aspirant to legislative honors, subject to the action of the Republican convention, was a welcome caller at this office, the Independent Republican, Montrose

 

News Briefs: Straw hats and barefooted boys are gradually making their appearance. AND A recent State law requires that the loose stones shall be removed from the highways once a month from April to October in each year. Road supervisors should see that this is done. AND There's a fortune in store for the man who invents a garden spade that will seem as light to a boy when he is preparing an onion bed as when he is digging for fish worms. AND Forepaugh & Sells' big circus will be at Wilkes-Barre May 19. It is the largest show now in existence.

 

May 22 (1902/2002)

 

 

Forest City - The mules have been taken out of the Erie mines at Forest City, and their shoes have been taken off. This looks like preparing for a long siege [strike].

 

Susquehanna - After a brief illness, of pneumonia, Michael Hogan, one of Susquehanna's oldest and most prominent residents, died at his home on Willow Street on Monday, aged about 70 years. He is survived by four daughters, Sister Mary Bernardine, of St. Rose Convent, Carbondale; Mrs. E.M. Tierney, of Binghamton; and Mrs. Jos. F. Lannon and Mrs. Wm. Graham, of Susquehanna. The funeral took place from St. John's Church, on Wednesday morning; interment was made in Laurel Hill Cemetery.

 

Kingsley -H.W. Jeffers has purchased and shipped here last week, 36 high-grade calves from the Walker Gordon Farms at Plainsboro, N.J.

 

Dimock - Jonas Gray, an old man 76 years old, can be seen daily ploughing on his hill, handling the team and plough as active as most of the young men of Dimock. AND The Dimock Camp Meeting will be from August 20th to August 28th this year. Greenwood & Fish will have charge of the boarding hall and the barn will be under the supervision of J.L. Carlin.

 

Franklin Forks - A new industry has just started in town. A Mr. Murphy has bought the hemlock on J.C. Wheaton's farm, near Salt Springs. He has a gang of men peeling the bark and on Tuesday had teams come with a portable mill, which will soon be in operation.

 

Rush - Services in memory of the late Fred Westbrook will be held at East Rush church Sunday. Mr. Westbrook died sometime ago of a very virulent type of diphtheria and the health authorities at the time thought a public funeral unwise.

 

Montrose - The county commissioners have made a contract with Messrs. Sullivan & Bodgley, of Binghamton, for the erection of a fire proof addition to the court house, as recommended by the last Grand Jury. The contract price was $2467. AND L.B. Pickett has invented still another and better window screen, which he is putting up for his patrons.

 

Lenoxville - The young ladies of Lenoxville gave a surprise party in honor of the Misses Maye Hallstead and Genevieve Halstead, at their home, Saturday evening, May 17th, 1902. The evening was very pleasantly spent in playing games. The most charming feature of the evening was the popular game "cotton ball," Edward Green receiving the prize for carrying the greatest number of balls. At a reasonable hour refreshments were served, after which they all departed, feeling that the evening had been well spent.

 

Alford - While the L. & M. train was going down Monday morning, a wheel on the "tender" broke, and it was nearly night before the wrecking crew from the main line could come and put the train into motion again. It occurred on the long steep grade going down into Alford, and it was fortunate that it was a wheel on the tender. Had it been one of the engine wheels, it would more likely have thrown the train from the track and had it rolled down the steep hill below the track, no one could have pictured the result.

 

Brandt - The old chair factory at Brandt will soon be a busy place again; there is a gang of men at work fitting it up for a chamois tannery and will employ from 20 to 30 hands to commence with and more later on.

 

Middletown - A number from here are attending the Summer Normal school at New Milford-among them, Lizzie McCormick, Sara Riley, Anna Conboy, Mary McManus, Anna McGovern, Margaret Keenan, Dan McCormick and Leo Golden. AND John Murphy has his new barn raised and from appearance is going to be a fine one. The work is being done by J.A. Curley.

 

Lindaville - George Stanton, of Factoryville, attended the funeral of a child of Mr. and Mrs. David Rosenkrants, of Lathrop, Sunday, as funeral director. Interment in the Hillsdale cemetery. Your correspondent was privileged to see the white horses and white hearse-emblem of purity.

 

South Montrose - Mrs. E.W. Sloat has a large tiger cat that is fond of young chickens. She would like to keep the cat, and also the chickens. Can somebody tell her how?

 

Glenwood - A.W. McAloon has his corn planted-about nine acres of ensilage corn; it was put in by machinery and took a little over half a day to do the work. AND Our genial postmaster and all around businessman, J.N. Bennett, is doing some hustling these days. He certainly has his hands full in looking after his interest on the farm, mill and store. May he succeed in all his undertakings is the wish of his many friends.

 

Clifford - The surprise party held at Annette Chamberlin's for the benefit and respect of the West Clifford school madam, Miss Wiles, was a grand success. About 9 o'clock, just after Miss Wilkes had retired for the night, the neighbors and friends commenced coming in and in the course of an hour the house was filled, and Miss Wiles notified of the surprise. She concluded, after getting up, that it was a genuine surprise. After some fine singing by the West Clifford choir and some instrumental music, and several other exercises, the surprise was most wonderfully increased by the abundance of refreshments; five kinds of fancy cakes, ice cream, oranges and bananas were served to all. Then the friends produced a very fine silk umbrella, which for them was presented with a few appropriate remarks by T.J. Wells, to Miss Wiles, as a token of their respect for her as a teacher. Miss Wiles arose and in a very able and ladylike manner, thanked them for her surprise and present.

 

South Auburn - Anyone wearing a linen duster the past few days should keep it buttoned.

 

Jackson - The many friends of Miss Allie Griffis met last Friday evening at her home in this place, to unite in wishing her a successful trip to her relatives in Iowa.

 

News Briefs - Towanda is to have an automobile factory and a building has been rented for that purpose. They expect to commence manufacturing them early next month. AND High price of meats is closing many markets throughout the country and causing an immense reduction in the use of meat as a food.

 

May 29 (1902/2002)

 

 

Forest City - The tide of population in Forest City is on the ebb...each train takes a number of men, some to the soft coal regions and many foreigners to the old country for a sojourn. When the strike ends, they will all come back. AND The mine mules are now generally in pasture and their antics when turned into a field were funny and pathetic. Some of those employed in the shaft openings had not seen daylight in eighteen months. They had little idea of space and could not understand how it was possible to prance about in any direction and not butt into a wall. They were unable to see for hours and it was a long time before they became accustomed to the springy turf and realize that they walk upon it. It took still longer to accustom them to grass, and they sniffed the air for hours before they could breathe naturally. After a day or two, when unafraid of the strange surroundings, they began to enjoy it.

 

Heart Lake - All indications point to Heart Lake as the most popular of all the excursion resorts in Susquehanna county for the approaching outing season. Summer excursionists prefer a lake resort, and the immense business of last season is likely to be surpassed this year. One notable event in June will be the Summer Normal for Sunday School workers, under the auspices of the state association.

 

Jackson - The farmers are interesting themselves in establishing the second co-operative creamery in the township, the plant to be established at Foley Corners. H.S. Brown and A.H. Crosier, of the Thompson Creamery, are promoting the business.

 

Hopbottom - The much-needed rain has come at last, and all nature is smiling-and so are the potato bugs.

 

Gibson - The telephone poles, on the new line from Jackson to Union Hill, are nearly all on the ground.

 

St. Joseph - Yes, we sampled it from David Sweeney's spring, called 'Silver Spring Water' and it was splendid. This water has been analyzed and found to contain valuable medicinal properties and some that have used it have received great benefit. Who knows, but in the near future that a sanitarium will be built at the fountain head, and that many will come and drink of nature's remedy, near St. Joseph. Mr. Sweeney has a large trade of Binghamton parties that he keeps supplied. We are told that about 100 rods from this spring, on Mr. Thomas Hawley's farm, gold has been found at the depth of 30 ft. If Mr. Hawley strikes it rich we will have to name his place Klondike.

 

Glenwood - There is talk of enlarging the little church as it is not large enough to accommodate all who wish to attend when ever you see a community get interested in church matters it is a sure sign of reform and the wave of reform that hits this place should be of mammoth size.

 

South Montrose - A.S. Allen secured the contract for building the cellar of the Ballentine mansion to be erected on the Parke's Hill. He has a large force of men at work, and wanting more. A number of striking coal miners, who are good at carpentering, are reported to be working on the mansion.

 

Springville - A very distressing accident befell a little child of Arthur Springer on Wednesday last. Elmer Squier, who works for Springer, on that day went into the house and took up his shot gun, which in some unaccountable manner was discharged, the shot going out through a window and striking the child in the back. Medical aid was hastily summoned, and the shot grains were removed, and the child is rapidly recovering. No blame is attached to anyone.

 

New Milford - Messrs. F.N. Titus and Charles Culver have formed a partnership and opened a furniture store and undertaking establishment at the old stand of N.F. Kimber.

 

Lawsville - The many friends and neighbors of Leonard Bailey made him a bee, the 15th, and did a good lot of work plowing and putting in crops. There were 12 teams. Mr. Bailey has been disabled all the spring with a lame arm and the assistance was very thankfully received.

 

Susquehanna - Memorial Day will be fittingly observed in Susquehanna. In the morning a squad from Moody Post will decorate the soldiers' graves in McKune cemetery. Rev. W.M. Bouton, pastor of the Methodist church, will deliver a short address and the pupils of the Oakland schools will sing. At one o'clock a public meeting will be held in Hogan Opera House.......and after the meeting a procession will be formed headed by the Susquehanna Band and the soldiers' graves in Laurel Hill, Grand Street and Evergreen cemeteries will be decorated with the usual ceremonies. In the evening a literary and musical entertainment will be held in Hogan Opera House, under the auspices of Moody Relief Corps, to defray the necessary expenses of the day.

 

Montrose - The sorrowful funeral of Prof. B.E. James took place Sabbath afternoon, May 25. The remains were taken to the M.E. church in season for all who desired to see his face. There was an immense concourse of people, estimated at fully 1200, and it was soon so crowded about the doors that hundreds went away. What an army of students will remember today, the man and teacher who has left an impress for good, that time and change will not efface from life or memory! And what a tidal wave of sorrow and tenderness will sweep over their hearts today as they say farewell to the old schoolmaster, friend of boyhood and girlhood days! Especially the teachers and scholars of old Montrose High School, who can never forget his unfailing interest in them and earnest effort in their behalf. Dr. Harrie James, of New York city, a younger brother, made a brief and exceedingly pathetic address in regard to the life and character of his brother and the loving friendship which had ever existed between them during their boyhood days in the fields of Auburn.

 

News Briefs - The chilly atmosphere on Wednesday forcibly reminded us of the cold, dismal Decoration Day eighteen years ago. It was the morning of May 30, 1884, when ice formed and fleecy flakes flitted through the air. AND The old wooden bridge across the river at Tunkhannock was sold at public sale on Saturday. The woodwork was bid off by Lindley Bros, of Factoryville, for $610. The stone work was not sold. James W. Platt, of Tunkhannock, bought the old toll house for $27.

 

June 06 (1902/2002)

 

 

News Brief - A little after 11 o'clock on Thursday night, May 30th, an alarm of fire was sounded-flames were seen in the rear part of the Montrose Democrat's office. The firemen responded quickly. The fire was burning fiercely just inside the north side of the building. From there it spread with great rapidity to all parts of the rear portion. But after the firemen really got to work at it, after holes had been cut in roof and floors, and No. 2 got to pouring on floods of water, and Rough & Ready firing their chemicals into the building, the fire soon began to weaken and a little later quit business. The origin of the fire is not fully known. The night was a still one, which was fortunate. Had it been one of those windy nights, preceding, no one can say what damage might have been wrought in that part of town and down towards the Baptist church. [The Democrat was back in business, having ordered new type and cases, and having the paper printed at the Independent Republican building, where Messrs. Taylor and Ainey kindly made room for them.]

 

Forest City - In anticipation of [strike] trouble the Erie Company's property has been enclosed with an eight-foot barbed wire fence and will be guarded by a large force of Coal and Iron police, sworn in by the officers of Susquehanna county.

 

West Lenox - The memorial exercises at West Lenox Baptist church, commonly known as "Tower" church, were a pleasant surprise. The Glenwood G.A.R. attended, as did the Cameron Corners Sons of Veterans. After everyone enjoyed a sumptuous repast, everyone adjourned to the church. The address by Rev. Austin, of Hopbottom, was pronounced to be very superior. One gray-headed man said that this is the first time I ever heard a minister talk on the civil war who understood the subject. AND Willis Birtch, who is helping Walter Tingley at present, says there must be great power in the east wind. The other night when the wind was in the east, the milk in one of his cans was compressed at least two inches, leaving the line where it stood at night plainly marked, thus the only inference was the east wind has started making condensed milk, or else someone is playing the same they did last winter and robbing milk cans. Hen roosts, too, are being despoiled of eggs, by someone. This thing ought to be stopped.

 

Flynn, Middletown Twp. - The sporting season has opened for the summer, many lively ball games having taken place here already.

 

Dundaff - Thieves entered the hog house of Chas. Cross and took therefrom six very fine pigs. They also entered the cellar of Mr. Cross' house and took a quantity of salt pork from a barrel. Mr. Cross has no clue to the thieves. Thieves also entered the cellar, the same night, of Rupert Wells and took all the salt pork found there. It seems they were going in whole hog or none. Farmers better see that their buildings are securely locked.

 

Thomson - The Erie has begun the work of filling in the high trestle. A large force of men and a steam shovel will be employed in the work, which will probably consume four months' time. It is estimated that it will require 100,000 cars of dirt to fill the gap.

 

Hallstead -Samuel Turrell's horse became frightened while at Hallstead, and broke lose from the sheds at the Baptist church, where he was hitched, and made a straight line for the railroad crossing on Pine street. A large gang of men were digging a ditch near the crossing. The horse plunged into the ditch and had to be removed with a derrick. The horse, fortunately, was not badly hurt, but the buggy was almost a total wreck.

 

Friendsville - Mr. Root, of Birchardville, has moved his mill here, to saw the timber for Byrne Brothers.

 

Flynn - M.P. Curley is having put up a 40 foot tower windmill to be used for pumping water and grinding feed.

 

Susquehanna - The School Board re-elected the old corps of teachers, with the except- ion of the principal. A principal will be elected at a meeting to be held two weeks hence. AND Michael Cotter's Oakland Side residence caught fire on Tuesday. A bucket brigade quenched the flames.

 

Silver Lake - Thirty-nine members of the Lady Jane Grey School, of Binghamton, spent three days at the Lake, arriving Friday afternoon and leaving Monday afternoon.

 

Lawsville - The bee, last Wednesday, to fix a fence around Bailey cemetery, was well attended.

 

Springville - Dora Taylor wishes to announce that she will do dressmaking. She learned the business in Montrose and is probably competent. AND The band will serve ice cream and cake and lemonade, on Saturday evening next, on the nicest lawn in town.

 

Welsh Hill, Clifford Twp. - Three hundred mine mules were turned out to pasture at Welsh Hill recently. They were from the mines at Pittston.

 

Montrose - The death of Prof. Danielle, a former dancing master of this place, occurred May 1st, at his oddly constructed home, "Octagon Castle," in St. John's, N.F. Prof. Danielle, while in Montrose, was very popular in conducting fancy balls, and he organized several classes, who held forth in Village Hall-then known as "Danielle's Hall," and which was interiorly festooned with balls of different colors, in compliance with his aesthetic taste. He also had a summer home in Forest Lake Twp., known as "Deer Lodge Farm." Its pretty yard [was] dotted over with flower-beds and cozy settees, and the huge antlers over the doorway, attracted a great deal of admiration, and was quite generally commented on. Prof. Danielle left Montrose about 15 years ago, and when he took up residence at St. John's, he started a restaurant, made fancy costumes, and conducted carnivals and fancy hops. Octagon Castle, a summer resort, was well patronized. In his castle he had a mortuary chamber fitted up by himself, and his coffin was lined with white silk, the drapery containing over 1000 pieces of the fabric, cunningly fashioned into shells, and embellished with fancy stitching. A beautiful white robe was also made to envelope him. When he died, a young man named Brazil, whom he adopted as his son and heir, carried out every wish of the peculiar Professor. His funeral was witnessed by fully 10,000 people, and it was very elaborate.

 

June 12 (1902/2002)

 

 

Oakland - The commencement exercises, held in the Congregational church on Friday evening, were largely attended and very interesting. Dr. Lincoln Hulley, of Bucknell University, delivered an able lecture. Subject-"Eugene Field and the Children." The following students were presented diplomas: Judson C. Fisher, Mamie E. Pettis, Anna C. Borgstrom, Mabel M. Cochrane, Joseph Jeffryes and Jessie M. VanOrsdale. Jessie VanOrsdale gave the valedictory and Judson Fisher gave the salutatory.

 

Elk Lake - Mrs. Blakeslee's cottage is progressing nicely under the direction of Allen & Son, of South Montrose.

 

Dimock - There will be an entertainment at the Dimock Literary Rooms, Saturday evening, June 14, consisting of phonograph selections, solos, instrumental, music and recitations. Adm. 10 cents. Come.

 

Harford - A very pretty wedding occurred at the home of Mrs. Mary Gillespie, on Wednesday evening, June 4th, when her daughter, Helen, was untied in marriage to Norman C. Adams by Rev. C.W. Hawkins. About 50 relatives and friends were present. Mendelssohn's wedding march was played by Mrs. Hawkins when the bridal procession marched to the parlor and stood under a large evergreen arch while the ceremony was performed. The company then adjourned to the dining room where a beautiful supper was served. The bride was attired in a blue landsdowne silk and wore white flowers. William Merrits and Miss Anna, sister of the bride as groomsman and bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. Adams left Thursday morning for a short visit with friends in New York State. The Harford Cornet Band, of which Mr. Adams is a member, furnished music.

 

Uniondale - The family of Zenas Rounds held their 25th annual gathering on June 4 in Carpenter's grove. This was the first held in a grove, all former gatherings being held at the old home. All relatives, no matter how distant, were invited to attend. About 100 of them were present and also 31 of the immediate family, only 15 being absent.

 

Welsh Hill - The mine mules which were turned out to pasture are making things hot there as is shown by this item by a Welsh Hill correspondent to an exchange: Recently about 100 mules broke loose in a neighboring oat field and could not be driven out until they had completely ruined the same-while a number at the same time were in David Jones' pasture chasing his young cattle and refused to leave until they had killed a young heifer. Should this thing continue our people will be forced to call an indignation meeting and proceed to have their just claims satisfactorily met.

 

Lake-a-Meadows - Chas. Downs has taken the contract of re-building the iron bridge, which was wrecked after the washouts.

 

Springville - Dr. Wm. E. Kelly, who recently graduated from the Philadelphia dental College, will spend one week, beginning Monday, June 16th, at the Springville Hotel, prepared to do all kinds of dental work.

 

Jackson - The Jackson school board organized by electing J.J. Savory, president; I.C. Hill, secretary and B.E. Leonard, treasurer. Seven teachers will be employed and five schools, outside the graded school, will be maintained. A 7 mill tax was levied.

 

Susquehanna - Miss Pauline Barrett, of Susquehanna, has accepted a position as teacher in the elocutionary department of the summer school of Susquehanna University, at Selinsgrove, Pa. Miss Barrett has also accepted the principalship of that department for the following year.

 

Hallstead - The offer made by Patterson parties has been accepted by owners of the silk mill, papers have been passed and check received to bind the bargain. Mr. Philip Weibler, on a visit to Paterson, under auspices of the board of trade, closed the bargain. Prospects are that the mill will be in operation in a short time. Extensive additions and alterations are to be made and from 250 to 300 hands will be employed. AND J.W. Snedaker has purchased and is running a new up-to-date delivery wagon.

 

Forest Lake - The annual picnic of the Jacob Cronk Family and friends will be held at Forest Lake, June 19th. All fiends and relatives are cordially invited.

 

Gibson and Jackson - C.W. Deakin, of Susquehanna and L.D. Hall, of Lake View, have purchased three tracts of 155 acres of timberland situated in Gibson and Jackson townships. There is estimated to be 3,500.000 feet of lumber upon said tracts upon which two steam saw mills will be erected. The contract for manufacturing the lumber, peeling the bark and delivering the same to New Milford, has been let to New York State parties.

 

Montrose - Last Friday morning Geo. P. Little and Edson S. Warner started for Skinners Eddy, driving a single horse and carriage. When descending a hill beyond Auburn Corners, near the resident of R.M. Bushnell, part of the harness broke, which frightened the horse into running at a terrific rate of speed. The vehicle was soon overturned, throwing the men underneath. The horse, however, was quickly stopped and they were both speedily extricated. By the kind assistance of R.M. Bushnell, Miss Jessie Bushnell, Patrick Riley and Mrs. Emmons, who were spectators of the accident, they were made comfortable as possible and the carriage repaired so that the injured ones were enabled to return home. Both men were lucky in having no bones broken. AND on the same morning....Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kelly, of Bridgewater, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lodge, (their guests from Nebraska) started for Silver Lake township to spend the day with relatives and friends. When about two miles from Mr. Kelly's home, near C.D. Hawley's place, the back seat of the wagon suddenly gave way and the ladies were thrown with great force, overback, to the ground. A physician was immediately summoned and found that no bones were broken, although the ladies received slight bruises and were badly shaken up and frightened.

 

News Brief - Nearly five acres of ground caved in near Pittston Monday as a result of robbing pillars in the mines. Many houses were badly damaged and the inmates in some were imprisoned in their homes for some time, the doors being wedged fast, and were at last rescued by means of a ladder from windows on the second floor. In places the earth has gone down seven feet. The damage will amount to thousands of dollars.

 

June 19 (1902/2002)

 

 

New Milford - The following teachers have been employed to teach in the New Milford school for the coming school year: Principal, Prof. Clarence Snyder, of Lenox; grammar, Miss Nettie Stillwell; intermediate, Miss Woodhouse; primary, Miss Elizabeth Shelp; second primary, Miss Nina Taft.

 

Hopbottom - Harry Fisk, a farmer living between Nicholson and Hopbottom, has created a great sensation by attempting to rid himself of his wife by the administration of slow poison. Mrs. Fisk was taken ill and the doctor who was summoned was mystified by the symptoms and his suspicions were aroused. He inspired some women, relatives of Mrs. Fisk, to make an investigation and one of them succeeded in opening a chest in which Fisk had arsenic, procured at a drug store, upon the claim that he wanted to poison rats, and of which he had been giving his wife "powders" which were slowly but surely doing their murderous work. Fisk was arrested, after which he made an assignment of all his property to M.L. McMillan, in trust for his wife, and then eluding the officer having him in charge, skipped for parts unknown. His motive in attempting to kill his wife was a desire to come into possession of property, which he had persuaded her to deed to him.

 

Montrose - In meandering about town last week and critically viewing the gardens of our residents, we were impressed with the fact that there are many fine ones, but among them all, the honors, we believe, are carried off by the one near the Methodist church which is worked by those two industrious and energetic little men, Hiram and Oliver Gilbert, sons of the late Mr. and Mrs. O.A. Gilbert. [The Gilbert's both died of Small Pox, as reported earlier in the year].

 

Forest City - Last Thursday, June 12, a list of the names of all those who are working in and around the mines, in disobedience to the strike order, was given to all the business houses in that town. The aim is to coerce merchants and others from furnishing food to non-union men.

 

Auburn - Charles Ernest Bunnell, a teacher in a government school at Kodiak, Alaska, had the degree of Master of Arts conferred upon him by Bucknell University, whose 52d annual commencement closed Wednesday. Mr. Bunnell is the son of Mr. and Mrs. L.W. Bunnell. [Charles Bunnell went on to be the first president of the University of Alaska]

 

Susquehanna - Samuel Higgins, who some years ago completed his trade as machinist in the Susquehanna shops, of which he became foreman, has been appointed to the position of general superintendent of motive power of the Southern Railway, with headquarters at Washington, D.C. For several years he has been superintendent of motive power and machinery of the Union Pacific Road, at Omaha.

 

Silver Lake - The roads have been newly worked, in this vicinity, and to those who drive for pleasure, it is quite difficult to "hold the hat on straight." They'll be better soon. AND City folks are seeking the beautiful haunts of our quiet "rocks and rills, and woods and templed hills," which Nature, (God's own handiwork) has so amply provided for the enjoyment of "the children of men." As we drove past the Rose, Sheldon and West homesteads, we were struck more forcibly with admiration than ever before, with the delightful surroundings of those three splendid landmarks of Susquehanna county. A neat little volume of photos could be made by the Kodak artist, even in this one pleasant corner of the County alone, of the lovely country homes, excellent farm lands, and of the magnificent woods which mantle the hills.

 

Springville - Saturday the East Lemon ball team came up to play with the Springville nine and a good game was played by our boys, but some weak work caused them to go down to defeat: score 7-9

 

South Montrose - A number of Italians have a cottage on the Ballantine farm, and are grading the driveways, etc.

 

South Gibson - J.E. Gardner has returned from a trip to New York, Harrisburg and other points. While away he purchased a high price engine, to be used as power for cutting ensilage threshing, etc., and will be ready to assist the farmers in season. AND J.H. Pritchard, the popular candidate for Sheriff, was in Scranton Monday. His many friends are anxious to see him come to the front.

 

Beech Grove [Auburn Twp.] - W.E. Sterling, the candidate for sheriff, is the son of Albert G. Sterling of this place. Warren was a good student, kind to the children on the playground. As a teacher he was one of the best; he is now a farmer in Jessup. I believe that if he is elected sheriff he will fill the office with credit to himself and honor to the voters of the Republican party of this county.

 

Lanesboro - At the School meeting Monday evening the following teachers were appointed. Principal, Wm. M. Denison; assistant, Mary A. Donovan; intermediate, Leora F. VanLoan; A primary, Mabel E. Taylor; A primary, Claire Taylor.

 

Heart Lake - Chauncey Foote, son of William Foote, who resides near Heart Lake, was missed from home by his father upon returning from work last Friday night, and inquiry made of neighbors that night and the day following failed to reveal his whereabouts. Fearing the boy might have wandered away, as he was only about ten years of age, a vigorous search was instituted on Sunday by about 50 of Mr. Foote's neighbors, but without result. It still lingered in the minds of some, however, that the boy might have met with an accident nearer home, and the search was continued by a band of the neighborhood's ladies. On Monday the father of the missing boy came to this place to obtain a clue as to his son's whereabouts, and on Tuesday went to Binghamton for the same purpose, but all his efforts were fruitless. It was not until Tuesday afternoon that he was discovered by Miss Nettie Sherman, in an adjacent pasture in which horses were grazing, and but about a quarter of a mile from home, lying face downward, dead. The body was badly decomposed and it is supposed that he met death Friday by being kicked by a horse. Justice Charles Shelp, of New Milford, was acting coroner in the inquest, and the jury impaneled delivered a verdict in accordance with the facts stated.

 

News Brief - Forty years ago (1862) this Fourth of July there was a heavy white frost Followed by a blistering afternoon. Let us hope history will not repeat itself.

 

June 26 (1902/2002)

 

Harford - Morrell Marean was born in Harford about 60 years ago and died in Washington, D.C. earlier this week. When a young boy his parents removed to Alford where he soon mastered the art of telegraphy and was employed by the D.L. & W.R.R. for several years as operator. When the Civil War broke out Mr. Marean went to Washington in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Co., and by rapid succession of promotions became general manager of the company's business in that city, which position he held till his death. He was accorded the honor of accompanying President McKinley's party on their Western trip last summer. Mr. Marean never forgot his old home and friends in Susquehanna county and nearly every year found time to visit them.

 

Montrose - The Montrose ball club was defeated at New Milford by the New Milford team on Saturday last by the score of 8 to 6. The game was a hot one and excellent playing was done on both sides. AND Miss Helen Amsbry gave a delightful party to a number of her young friends on Monday. The young people were driven down to Salt Springs in the morning by Liveryman Harrington in a four-horsed wagon, where the day was most enjoyably spent at that picturesque spot.

 

Susquehanna - The Erie railroad yards have a capacity of 1,600 cars. AND Chief-of-Police McMahon, on Saturday, discovered the 11 year old daughter of Theo. Prentice, of Colesville, N.Y., at the home of the mother of Chas. Crissell, at Germantown, near Lanesboro. Representing himself to be a Binghamton pension agent, Crissell had lured the girl from home and was about to marry her.

 

Great Bend - The Great Bend chamois tannery is to be reopened. This was decided upon Tuesday of last week when C.F. Wright, E.R.W. Searle, A.H. McCollum and William Post, representing the First National Bank of Susquehanna, held a conference with the Messrs. Chapot. The bank recently foreclosed a mortgage on the tannery. The bank representatives sought to secure from the Messrs. Chapot the secret of their method of tanning, but this they would not divulge unless employed under contract for five years. The services of the Messrs. Chapot were then dispensed with and it was decided to reopen the tannery as soon as a competent tanner can be secured. It is said such a man will be brought from Paris.

 

Lathrop Twp. - Harry Fisk, who has been charged with attempting to poison his wife, Mary H. Fisk, has retained John M. Kelly, Esq., as his attorney to recover his real estate and personal property, which he alleges was obtained from him without consideration and under duress, in connection with the above charge. His wife, who most emphatically denies all wrong doing or attempt thereof on the part of her husband, and who has the most implicit confidence in him, insists that he shall set aside the conveyance of all said property as speedily as possible, and she will use all honorable means to assist him in so doing.

 

Uniondale - Uniondale will celebrate the Fourth this year in grand style. Amusements of the old-fashioned kind will be employed to make the day a success. A musical entertainment will be given in the evening and the proceeds will be used toward the furtherance of the coal-drilling prospect.

 

Springville - Last Thursday morning J.R. Titman got up to shoot crows that were pulling his corn. Thinking to feed his team before going out he went to the barn and hung his lantern in its usual place. In getting hay the lantern was knocked off its place, setting everything around it on fire and Titman had to hustle to get anything out. His team, harness and one wagon were saved. A horse power, an engine, wagons, fodder cutter, small farm tools, five or six tons of hay and straw were burned. No help being there, many things were lost that might otherwise have been saved. He places his loss at $1,000 with insurance of $200 on barn and $300 on contents. He will rebuild during the summer.

 

Rush - The Ladies' Aid Society of the Baptist church will serve a dinner on the church lawn, July 4th. Two speakers will be in attendance, and an orchestra will furnish music for the day. Ice cream will be served afternoon and evening.

 

New Milford - Susquehanna county again wins honor at Mansfield State Normal School. Miss Elizabeth Shelp, of New Milford, was awarded the first senior price--$25, for highest scholarship in a class numbering one hundred.

 

Jackson - The eleventh annual reunion of the Estabrook family was held at the home of Richard Estabrook, June 5, 1902. About sixty persons were present. The tent of the Lamb and Hall families was used. The following officers were elected: President, Richard Estabrook; vice-president, John Estabrook; secretary and treasurer, W.J. Lamb. The next annual gathering will be held at the home of S.H. Estabrook, in Oakland township, the first Thursday in June 1903.

 

Franklin Twp. - They have not struck oil at the Salt Springs as we have heard of but they have struck lumber, as there are four teams hauling it every day to Conklin.

 

Flynn-Middletown Twp. - The Fourth of July is near at hand. We notice some new bonnets-now the horse and carriage. AND Charles Murray and lady friend visited friends in Choconut, Sunday. AND Our school directors are investing the surplus school money in real estate.

 

Glenwood - Levi Baker, who left here in 1854 for [the] west, has returned for a visit and is stopping with his brother-in-law, James Conrad. He thinks there has been many and noticeable changes in the last half century. He is 72 years of age and is spry as a man of 20. Time has dealt very leniently with him and he bids fair to reach the century mark.

 

News Briefs - Christian Smith, the oldest locomotive engineer in the country, lives near Harper's Ferry. Md. He ran the first engine on the Baltimore and Ohio railroad at a speed of from 6 to 8 miles an hour, which was considered rapid for those days. AND Mr. Carnegie offered Binghamton a $75,000 public library, providing the city will pay 10 per cent of this amount annually, for all time. George Kent, Binghamton's great cigar manufacturer, figured it out that this was exactly the same as though the city borrowed $75,000 and bonded itself to pay 1- per cent for all time, which he says no sane business man would do. AND The novel sight of years gone by of seeing women raking hay was exemplified in this place recently, and now we are coming back to the good old times when all hands turn out, and the farmer has grain and hay to sell instead of buying.

 

July 01 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - Henry Blackburn of "Roanoke, Va. is the guest of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. V. Blackburn. He made the trip awheel, in ten days. AND The 41st annual commencement exercises of that famous old seat of learning-Laurel Hill Academy, was held and very largely attended in Hogan Opera House on Monday and Tuesday evenings. Many out-of-town people, including several Sisters of the Immaculate Heart, were present. It was one of the very best entertainments ever held under the auspices of the school, and this is saying a great deal. At the close of the exercises Rev. Fr. P.F. Brodrick, the able pastor of St. John's Church, in eloquent words, presented the diplomas to 23 pupils.

 

Silver Lake - Arthur Hayes' time on the mail route between Mud Lake and Binghamton, expires this week. He will continue to bring passengers and freight from Binghamton as usual. A Mr. Meeker and son take the place of rural delivery agents, to be paid $600 a year. Mr. Hayes only received $400 a year for carrying the mail but made a good sum in the summer by carrying passengers and goods.

 

Brookdale - Mrs. Robert Boren had a quilting, June 19, in honor of her daughter's 18th birthday, and a dance in the evening.

 

Harford - Harry Miller has bought the Aunt Polly Guile's house on the corner, and occupies the same.

 

Hallstead - Three rattlesnakes were killed here last week, one measuring over six feet.

 

Lawsville - The Liberty School Board will hire teachers Monday at 2 o'clock at creamery hall. Teachers desiring schools should send in their application or apply in person on that day. AND Negotiations have been made with Mr. Chaffee for a lot on which to erect a Catholic church.

 

Springville - Emma Avery is reported as having sixty pupils to whom she is giving music lessons. AND The Episcopals have this week had a very nice baptismal font and chandelier placed in their church.

 

Auburn - Mrs. J. Carlin, of Carlin's Mills, is one of the best preserved of our county's oldest residents. She attained the grand old age of 90 years on the 26th of November last, and bears proudly the record of having been a constant reader of the Independent Republican and its immediate predecessors for the period of 60 years. We congratulate Mrs. Carlin upon her old age and upon her equally fine discrimination in reading matters.

 

Great Bend - Editor Psalmuel More of the Great Bend Plaindealer offers to run a foot race, for a short distance, with a "good fat strawberry short cake" as the prize, with Editor B.F. Pride, of the Susquehanna Journal, this spectacular event to take place in connection with the big celebration at Susquehanna on July 4th.

 

Montrose - A gang of about 40 men will soon be at work on the Montrose branch of the Lehigh Valley laying heavier rails and putting in longer and larger ties, straightening curves, and in fact, improving the track as much as possible. This is regarded by many as being the first real step toward abolishing the narrow gauge track and instituting the long wished for broad gauge in the near future.

 

Rush - The horse traders camping here the last two weeks pretended they were strikers from Scranton, but those who traded with them say they are professional horse sharks.

 

Forest City - Mrs. George Maxey, an aged resident, passed away peacefully from earth last Thursday, June 26, after many weeks of suffering. She was 80 years of age and about six months ago suffered a stroke of paralysis, since which time she has been unable to talk. Mrs. Maxey's maiden name was Daniels. She had resided here about 11 years, coming from South Gibson, but her early-married life was spent in Olyphant, where she was well known. Her husband died a few month's ago. Four sons survive her: Hon. William Maxey, of South Gibson; Benjamin, George E. and John Maxey, of Forest City.

 

Glenwood - The Grangers had a jubilee day, Saturday. Ice cream and cake were served in great plenty. This Grange is the largest in the county and is on a sound financial basis.

 

Uniondale - What naughty boys, to take Mr. Cable's hand cart one night last week, and run through the street towards the bridge that had been taken up to put in new stringers on, and the boys shouting "whoa, whoa," every jump, and Mr. Ed Morgan, kind hearted fellow, rushing out, with a lantern in hand after, as he supposed, a runaway team, and expecting to find some poor unfortunate person struggling in the water, and meaning to help. But, he not seeing anyone that needed his assistance, returned from whence he came, while the boys were chuckling in the brush over what they had done. Mr. Morgan, no doubt, has forgiven the boys for the first offence, but don't do it again.

 

Ararat - A dispatch to the Binghamton Republican says, "Seven years ago, Simon Eustace, of Ararat, Pa., left home one morning to obtain a beefsteak. He did not return and his wife finally gave him up for dead, and, after three years of weary waiting and weeping, she remarried. A year ago she became a widow. Last Sunday morning Simon suddenly returned with the beefsteak. "He says his mind has been a blank until a year ago, when he found himself peddling washing machines at Fort Wayne, Indiana." From paper in his possession it is shown that he has been all over the United States and Canada. The beefsteak was cooked, and the angel of love once more spread her wings over they snow-capped hills of lofty Ararat. [The article is titled Fiction is Stranger Than Truth. We have no idea if the above is truth or fiction].

 

News Brief - The [mine] strike makes trouble in many ways. One of the most curious was at Pittston, where James a. Donnelly was compelled to quit work as a mine pump runner before he could hire a carriage to take himself and his bride to church. The wedding was to have taken place more than a week ago, but every liveryman in the city had been notified to refuse him a carriage. Sooner than lose his bride, Donnelly quit work and was married June 25th.

 

July 10 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - The Philadelphia "North American", on Friday, contained a portrait of Miss Pauline E. Barrett, of Susquehanna, who has been elected to the Chair of Oratory, in Susquehanna University at Selinsgrove, Pa., and says - "Miss Barrett's wide experience as an elocutionist eminently qualifies her to fill the new position. She will assist Prof. Edward V. Dunlavey, head of the department of elocution during the summer season."

 

Rush - There were no tears shed by the respectable part of the community when the horse traders folded their tents and flitted.

 

Herrick Centre - Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rought celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary, Monday, June 30. AND Nellie Burns and Alarie Bowell, both of this place, were married July 1, at Hancock, N.Y.

 

Harford - Gertrude Stearns has entered a preparatory school in Philadelphia, for trained nurses.

 

Forest Lake - Hugh Chalker has sold his farm in Nebraska and returned to this place to live with his son, Frank.

 

Lindaville (Brooklyn Twp.) - The 4th was an ideal day. At about noon the company began to assemble from all points of the compass, people being in attendance from Scranton, Nicholson, Hopbottom, Brooklyn and Lathrop. Tables were set in the store building and ice cream was served on the lawn. AND In Brooklyn - Roy Shadduck, who has just completed a commercial course at Wyoming Seminary, has entered in partnership with E.E. Tiffany and they have opened the meat market, which had been closed for several months. Brooklyn people are happy over the arrangement, as it insures a good market and keeps a bright, energetic young man at home.

 

South Auburn - L.T. Place drove back in his field and as the woodchucks are rather thick he took his gun along. Arriving at the field he saw one of the animals and thinking he could take a good aim from his wagon he stood up and fired. The report of the gun frightened his horse and Mr. Place was thrown violently to the ground, striking on his head and shoulder, leaving him unconscious for some time. Finally gaining consciousness Mr. Place managed to get to the house. Dr. Harrison was summoned at once and reported no bones broken, but badly bruised.

 

Nicholson - The Nicholson school commences Monday, Sept. 1st. The lady teachers have been required to sign a contract that in case of marriage during the school year they will give up their positions.

 

Uniondale - Drilling for coal on the Carpenter property, Uniondale, still continues. The prospects are very favorable. After drilling 400 ft. they found three seams of coal, one being eighteen inches in thickness.

 

Forest City - Robert Jones, a resident of Forest City, died on Sunday evening in the Forest City Baptist Church in a manner which is remarkable for its peculiarity and pathos. Mr. Jones had just finished offering prayer, the last words of which were: "For ye know not at what time the Son of Man may visit you," after which the choir sang "Throw out the Life Line," and before that beautiful hymn was ended, his soul had departed from this earth to the celestial realms above. His tragic end deeply impressed the large congregation, which was in attendance at the church. He was 75 years old and will be greatly missed in the religious circles of that place in which he was a prominent worker.

 

Heart Lake - The 4th of July celebration this year, attracted a large number of people, not only from the immediate vicinity of that popular resort, but from many other points as well. The day was an ideal one, and people began to arrive early. Every train was packed with visitors, and about 500 Montrosers were present. Among the attractive features of the day were dancing, a fantastic parade and riding the merry-go-round, which was teeming with the young all the day and evening. Boats were plying the lake and the small boy got in his vociferous work with his fire crackers and pistol. The Brevier Orchestra discoursed excellent music during the afternoon and evening. The occasion was a very happy one, and shortly after midnight nearly all had departed for home.

 

Binghamton - The engagement has been announced of Miss Helen Elizabeth Weeks, one of Binghamton's most talented young ladies, formerly of Montrose, to Mr. G.H. Dickinson.

 

Bridgewater - John W. Young, a student at the Scotland, Pa. Soldiers' Orphan School, is spending his vacation with his mother, Mrs. Lydia Young. This is an industrial school and John is learning the printing trade. While in to see The Democrat staff he set up a "stick" just to keep his hand in. Earl Evans, a pupil at the same school, is also here for his vacation, staying at Horace Welsh's.

 

Scranton - H.S. Stark, champion bag puncher of America, and heir to the Stark estate of Philadelphia and Tunkhannock, was a recent guest here. The estate is valued at about $225,000 and is entirely in real estate. Mr. Stark is a young man of 22. Besides being champion bag punch of America, he is an all round athlete and has written several magazine articles on athletics. He is the son of the late Judge Stark of Philadelphia and great-grandson of General John Stark, one of the most valiant and noted generals of the Revolutionary War. Champion Stark is a modest appearing young fellow and is a nephew of Chief Justice J. Brewster McCollum of Montrose and is distantly related to many others in Susquehanna county and in the Wyoming Valley.

 

News Brief - An exchange remarks: The newspaper is a law book for the indolent, a library for the poor, and admonisher to the lawless. It may stimulate the most indifferent, it may instruct the most profound, but it cannot be published without cost and mailed free to the subscribers. AND Mrs. Sylvia Dunham, of Binghamton, in 1800, made her first trip from home at the age of five in a stagecoach, at 49 she rode in a railway train, at 99 on an electric car and recently at 102 she enjoyed an automobile trip. She is still quite active with household duties. AND A great many people have a great deal to say that doesn't amount to a great deal. Ever notice it?

 

July 18 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - At Columbian grove on Saturday, F.E. Brush, of Oakland, caught, in the river, a pike weighing 12 lbs. AND Because "Susquehanna Borough" was written on the special election returns, instead of "The Borough of Susquehanna Depot, Pa.," it will probably be necessary to hold another special election before the borough can proceed to erect the $10,000 public building.

 

Thomson - A ball game recently played between Thompson and Winwood, resulted in a victory for Thompson. The young ladies furnished supper for both clubs on the hotel lawn. AND Chas. E. Moxley and Chas. Lamb were appointed to arrange a genealogical record of the Hall-Lamb families, up to July 1, 1902, for the reunion report in August-all communications to be reported to C.E. Moxley, Hallstead, Pa.

 

Harford - The following teachers have been hired for the District schools the coming term-Tiffany, Normal Darrow; Richardson Mills, Velma Little; Sweet, Lillian Tingley; East Hill, Eugene Osmun; Harding, Jessie Robbins; Oakley, Clyde Patterson; Tingley, Flora Sweetser.

 

Birchardville - The experience of Miss Amy Bradshaw with snakes, while living in Florida-where they are very plenty-in connection with good nerves, came in good use the other day. As she went to the door of the house of M.L. Ball, she saw a snake coming up the hatchway from the cellar. She sprang for a hoe that was near by and on turning to meet the foe he had his head raised about a foot from the ground ready for battle. Not in the least daunted Miss Bradshaw, by a few decisive blows with the hoe, put a quietus on the snake, and she had full control of the battlefield. It was a black snake and measured 4 feet and 6 inches.

 

Hallstead - Measurements are being made preparatory to erecting an electric line from Susquehanna to Hallstead. Hallstead will get her lights from the Susquehanna plant.

 

Great Bend - The managers of the chamois tannery at Great Bend have engaged a tanner from New York who is an expert at preparing chamois skins, and he will begin work in about a week. At that time it is expected that the tannery will resume business with a full force.

 

Uniondale - The Uniondale 4th of July celebration netted $168, which will be used toward promoting the coal mining enterprise now being vigorously pushed in that place.

 

Montrose - It is said that the poetical writings if Mrs. Edith Shaw Jones, of Montrose, are in demand among appreciative publishers at remunerative figures. It is one thing to write verse; it is quite another to have it accepted for publication in the better class of periodicals.

 

Glenview - Congressman Galusha A. Grow, who was a member of Congress fifty years ago and later Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Civil War Congress, was recently forced to leave the hotel that has been his home in Washington for over half a century. The hotel in question is the old Willard, a famous hostelry, now called the Fairfax to distinguish it from the New Willard, and which will soon be torn down to make room for an addition to the latter structure. Mr. Grow was visibly affected as he passed for the last time through the doorway of the old hotel which has been his Washington home for so long. A room on the same floor, in the same location as his old room, when the new structure is completed, has been promised to Mr. Grow.

 

Dimock - The Union Harvest Home S.S. pic-nic association, representing 23 S.S. will hold their annual pic-nic on Dimock camp-ground, Wednesday Aug. 6. Program will include good choir music, addresses and a band concert. All friends of the Sunday School invited.

 

Forest City - Postmaster T.C. Manzer had the misfortune to have a leg fractured in a runaway Sunday. His horse was frightened by the breaking of a shaft, and after finding that he could not control the animal, Mr. Manzer jumped, snapping both bones in his left leg. AND W.J. Morgan has the sympathy of the community in the tragic death of his oldest son, William, by drowning in the Delaware.

 

Lathrop - Grace May Mackey, an esteemed young lady of this place, died Monday, July 7, of consumption. She was the daughter of John B. and Augusta I. Mackey. She graduated from Nicholson graded school in 1899 and Keystone Academy in 1901.

 

New Milford - A social and ice cream festival will be held Thursday evening at the parish house of the Episcopal church. One will be held on Friday evening, at the Methodist church, under the direction of the Epworth League. The band will be present at both.

 

Fairdale - Some days ago, while J.W. Throckmorton was going through a lot near the barn, a bull attacked him, getting him [J.W.] down, but he [J.W.] got away and went into the barn and got a pitch fork and struck him [the bull], breaking one of the tines; the creature still showed fight. He [J.W.] then went to the house and got his gun and fired at his [the bulls] head, and as he [J.W.] turned shot him [the bull] in the side-he [the bull] left and Web was the victor.

 

News Briefs - An exchange tells of a man who purchased a revolver for his wife and insisted upon target practice, so that she could defend the home in case of his absence. After the bullet had been dug out of him and the cow buried, he said he guessed she'd better shoot with an axe. AND A caravan of striking miners consisting of several men, two women and two children, enroute to Elmira, where it is hoped employment will be found, have camped at different places along the way. The children and camp equipage are transported by means of three baby carriages. AND "A great many people stand in deadly fear of cucumbers," said a well known physician, who enjoys a large family practice. "I have heard people say that they would just as soon eat poison. Now the cucumber is perfectly harmless, if properly prepared, and to my mind there is nothing so tasty and refreshing. To guard against any after effects the cucumber should be cut very thin and remain in water for three or four hours, with a little salt sprinkled over them. Half an hour before they are eaten they should be placed in ice water and this will entirely restore their freshness and crispness."

 

July 25 (1902/2002)

 

 

Lindaville, Brooklyn Twp. - A mammoth paper balloon was found on the farm of Henry McCoy, of this place, in the early morning of July 5th. The envelope that accompanied it has the address of A.O. Dunlap, Springville, Pa. Return after two years and nine months for a reward.

 

Lenox - Leon Squires, grandson of P. P. Squires, a lad of 12 years, while hunting woodchucks, put a charge of shot into one of his feet, [and] the gun being so close made a bad hole entirely through the foot and one toe had to be amputated. Dr. Taylor is the attending physician. Careless use of fire arms in the hands of young boys should be frowned down.

 

Uniondale - Uniondale Cornet Band gives concerts from their new band stand, erected near public square. They accompanied an excursion to Shohola Glen recently.

 

Glenwood - The continuous rain has been a bad one on the farmers, some of whom have several acres of grass down, which will undoubtedly be spoiled before it can be taken care of. Also, potatoes are beginning to rot. If such should be the case, with coal at $5 a ton, it will make the poor man wonder where or how he will get through the winter; but it could be a great deal worse, so let us be thankful for what we have and there has always been a "seed time and harvest" and will be again.

 

Harford - What is going to happen? We have had five fair days in succession. (Rain).

 

Clifford - Earl Sickler, a boy working on the Thomas Maxey farm, while at play in the barn, fell from a beam or hay rack and struck on a board, tearing his kidneys loose, or something else inwardly. The doctor was called at once but could do nothing for him; he said there was no help for him unless he could be got to the hospital at once. He was taken to the Carbondale hospital the same night.

 

Herrick Centre - Mrs. J.F. Fletcher and son, Howard, of Forest City, are with Mr. and Mrs. W.H. Fletcher, gathering their yearly supply of red raspberries.

 

Susquehanna - Farmer Larter of Cascade Valley, sold neighbor, Farmer Wadsworth, a half interest in a Jersey cow, and soon refused to divide the milk, maintaining that Wadsworth owned the front half of the cow. The cow on Saturday hooked Larter and he will sue Wadsworth for damage. AND The Susquehanna river is higher than it has ever been known in the month of July. It is raising the dickens with farmers' crop and everything else within its reach.

 

Springville - The excursion to Harvey's Lake last Sunday was well attended from this county, and the Narrow Gauge, which conveyed the excursionists to Tunkhannock, was unable to accommodate all its would-be passengers, and it was necessary to go by all stations (although crowded with people) after leaving Springville. In making the return trip an attempt was made to draw four heavily loaded cars up the grade with one engine, but when about a half mile from Tunkhannock it was found necessary to return for another engine. They reached Montrose about midnight, a tired but happy lot, all having thoroughly enjoyed a most pleasant day.

 

Silver Lake - James Whalley, of Silver Lake, died on Saturday evening last, at the age of 68 years. He is survived by the following children: Joseph, of Scranton (formerly of Montrose); John, of Susquehanna, James of Sayre; Jerome, William and Harry, of Silver Lake; Mrs. J.E. Gahagan, of Susquehanna; Kate Whalley, of Binghamton; and Anna, Lizzie and Nellie, of Silver Lake. The funeral occurred on Tuesday morning from St. Augustine's Church, in that place.

 

Bridgewater Twp. - a gipsy band is encamped in Scott's woods, near the poorhouse farm. They are of the usual type and are engaged in their usual occupation of horse-trading, fortune telling (?), etc.

 

Lanesboro - A Lanesboro man has invented a steamer which is expected to go through rifts, over dams, and run wherever it is a little moist.

 

Lawsville - Dr. E.R. Tower killed six cows out of a herd of seven belonging to Charles LaSure of, Lawsville Centre, last week. This makes 159 cattle infected with tuberculosis that Dr. Tower has killed within the past year, not counting an occasional cow of which the doctor has lost count.

 

Montrose - The funeral of Byron O. Camp took place from his late residence on Lincoln Avenue, July 25. Comrades of Four Brothers Post No. 453, G.A.R., assembled at their hall at half past three. Color Sergeant John Quinn, carrying the Post flag, led the procession through South Main St. and up Drinker St. to the Camp residence. The bar soon arrived afterward and among its members was Hon. J.B. McCollum, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Penna. The distance to the cemetery, being short, the hearse was dispensed with and the Four Brothers' Post led the procession and next came the Bar; then the casket carried by relatives of the deceased, the members of the family and friends following.

 

Byron Camp was born at Camptown, Bradford Co., April 16, 1837. He was a teacher and principal, a carpenter, soldier, Notary Public and lawyer. He became a member of the 15th Pa. Cavalry, known as the Anderson Troop, in 1862, and saw a good deal of active and severe service. He was promoted to First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious service in Tennessee and in the fall of 1864 received his commission as Captain. He returned to Montrose and entered the office of Hon. J.B. McCollum and in 1868 was admitted to the Bar. In 1898 Mr. Camp was admitted to the Supreme Court of the State. His wife and three children survive him.

 

Thompson - The Free Methodist Camp Meeting will be held here Aug. 20 to 27, in charge of Rev. A.G. Miller, presiding elder. Tents can be rented from Rev. J.T. Logan, 13 Academy St., Wilkesbarre, Pa. The Prohibition meeting, on Thursday, Aug. 21, at 2 p.m., will be addressed by Bishop Sellew, E.D. Nichols, Esq., and by Revs. O.M. Owen, M.D. David, A.W. Myer, and others. Gates closed to the public on Sunday, Aug. 24.

 

August 01 (1902/2002)

 

 

Hallstead - The heavy rains in this vicinity and near the head waters of the Susquehanna in central New York caused a rise in the Susquehanna river last week, of about 14 ft. About 100 acres of low land was under water. Harmony creek had full banks and the water of the river overflowing backed up in the neighborhood of the DuBois farms for a half mile, covering the flats about a third of a mile wide, giving the region the appearance of an inland lake, with great trees growing in its midst; a beautiful sight, but a costly picture, the water covering the fence posts and from three to six or eight feet in depth. Under the water for days were fields and meadows, with grass, hay, corn and potatoes wholly out of sight.

 

Montrose - Today the "Fats" and the "Leans" will play a game the line-up being of the following distinguished citizens: The Fats: N.J. North, R.B. Stroud, B.B. Buffum, Frank Lusk, W.B. Jeffers, Geo. C. Burns, F.W.Strange, W.C. Cox, Dr. Gennung, W.N. Barnes, W.S. Mulford, Norman Stewart, J.P.Taylor, J.R. Raynsford. The Leans: Harry Halpin, H.A. Lyons, E.E. Tower, H.F. Brewster, F.D. Morris, G.K. Stoddard, Peter Dale, Searle McCollum. Willet Munger, Barry Searle, D.V. Gardiner, A.L. Titman, Daniel Searle. The Fats defeated the Leans 12-8. The attendance at the ball game was undoubtedly the largest that ever was present when admission was charged, there being bout 600 tickets sold. The amount taken in at the gate was $77.10.

 

Oakley (Harford Twp.) - Robbers and sneak thieves are becoming entirely too previous all through this country. Witness the theft of Mr. Underwood's horse a few weeks ago, followed by the attempt at robbery at Welcome Wilmarth's and Mr. Ingraham's, Wed. the 23d. The thieves entered by a window and then with excellent forethought propped open the outside door and a bedroom door; one of the inmates of the house was aroused by some one prowling around, but they escaped before they could be identified.

 

Lake Carey (Wyoming Co.) - Four naptha launches now ply the waters of Lake Carey. One is owned by Elisha Williamson, a Pittston grocer; another by Landlord Coolbaugh; another by Mr. Fuerstine, of Wilkes-Barre, and the fourth by Dr. Warner, of Wilkes-Barre. There are many sailing crafts and when all are on the lake it forms a pretty sight.

 

Springville - There is said to be three cases of small-pox over at Harris Phelps' near West Nicholson, in the southern part of the township. Two parties from here were over there on Sunday, before the disease had developed far enough to be known, and now the proper authorities are taking steps to have them quarantined. AND Nearly every night in some part of our little village the inhabitants are awakened by the loud talk and oaths of some one, the little the worse for the demon, liquor. What is our town coming to? What of our boys and men? What will the end be? AND Fred Risley is the possessor of a new buggy with rubber tires. We don't think Fred will have to take a back seat and when the girls ask you to take them, there can be no excuse.

 

Susquehanna - Charles E. Schaber, the unfortunate stranger who last week fell from a train at the Cascade, and afterward underwent an operation for dislocated vertebrae, is alive and may recover.

 

Franklin Forks - The oil work at Salt Springs is a thing of the past, much to the regret of our townsmen. The last load of the machinery was moved Wednesday of this week. AND The schoolhouse in this place is to be repaired and made larger, as it will not accommodate all the pupils who are to attend.

 

Lindaville (Brooklyn Twp.) - John Bolles of this place, died Friday morning, July 25, 1902, in his 82nd year. His sickness, while gradual, was severe, and during the last few weeks his strength failed and he passed away quietly. He is survived by a widow and three children-Jas. W. of Harford, Chas. F. of this place, and Mrs. F.H. Bunnell of Dimock and two sisters, Mrs. Harriet Baker and Mrs.Chas.Tingley. He was a much-respected citizen and one who will be missed by friends and neighbors as well as his own household. The funeral was largely attended on Sunday afternoon from the Brooklyn Presbyterian Church, Rev. R.L. Roberts officiating. The casket was placed in the hearse by the bearers-E.P. Mack, T.J. Lean, M.B. Smith and D.C. Westbrook.

 

Elk Lake - Mrs. Eliza Cornell, of New Milford, is visiting friends in this place. Although she is past 82 years she is hale and hearty and her mind is clear to tell of things past years ago when she first became acquainted with this place.

 

Silvara (Bradford Co.) - Quite a number made a raid on huckleberry mountain last week. They obtained a nice lot of berries and Burt Warner and T. Hall captured a live rattlesnake which Mr. Hall has in his possession.

 

West Nicholson - The 9th annual reunion of the Squires families will be held in the Horton Squires grave [should read in the Horton Squires grove] near West Nicholson, August 8th. P.E. Squires, Sec.

 

Herrick Centre - Earl Howe caught a base ball on the end of his nose Saturday. He is under the care of Dr. Craft who says he will be all right in a short time. At present he is not at home to any callers.

 

News Brief - Sylvia Langdon Dunham celebrated the 102nd anniversary of her birth Sunday at her home near Bristol, Conn. She is in excellent health and received many callers and neighbors on that memorable day. Mrs. Dunham is about the house every day, reads the newspapers, and attends to her own work. She is preserved in a remarkable degree. Mrs. Dunham was born in the house where she now lives, the old Dunham tavern, on the New Haven and Harford stage road. In it she was married in 1824, and the old taproom is still preserved. She has lived to see old Northampton Canal built past her home; later the canal railroad, then a trolley line, on which she was the first passenger. Mrs. Dunham's father was a soldier in the Revolution and she saw General Lafayette. Mrs. Dunham said on her anniversary that she saw no reason why she was not good for ten years longer. Her son, Rev. Samuel Dunham, of Binghamton, preached in the Presbyterian church at Montrose a few weeks ago.

 

August 08 (1902/2002)

 

 

New Milford - Walter L. Main's railroad circus will be at New Milford on the 20th of August. AND Forty-two city children from the tenements arrived in New Milford on Thursday of last week for a short outing.

 

Vestal, New York - While tearing down an old homestead near Vestal, workmen found the skeleton of a human being between the partition walls. The skeleton was face down. The bones were in a fair state of preservation, and near them were found a soldier's canteen, a bayonet, and New York papers bearing date June, 1865.

 

Hallstead - Homer Ca?well (Caswell, Capwell ?) living near Hallstead, was out on the mountain picking berries, when a rattlesnake bit his thumb. He pulled out his revolver and shot the snake's head off; then turning the weapon toward his hand he blew the end of his thumb off, thus preventing the poison being carried through his system. The thumb was amputated and no serious results are likely to follow.

 

Forest City - While workmen were excavating for blue stone near Forest City recently, they unearthed the petrified bones of an animal estimated to have been 16 ft. long. The body lay head downward on a shelf under a projecting rock. The left foreleg was missing. A hind leg had been broken off at the knee, but the foot was found under the root of a tree near by. Lime water falling on the bones had turned them into stone, but the outlines were perfect. Footprints as large around as a half-bushel measure were found. The farmers of the neighborhood believe the bones to be those of a monster species of the horse, but a Scranton geologist is sure they are those of a mastodon.

 

Springville/Lathrop Twp. - Several cases of small-pox in West Nicholson and near Springville and Lathrop have excited the gravest apprehension of the people. The School Directors of Springville have appointed J. O. Lyman sanitary officer and his appointment has been confirmed by Judge Searle. Every precaution will be taken to prevent the spread of the disease and thorough quarantine established. Greenwood & Lyman have closed their branch store at Lathrop.

 

Towanda, Bradford Co. - Bent with the weight of 103 years, but still vigorous and clear-minded, Richard Vanderpool has declared that he does not care particularly to live any longer. He lives at Towanda, with a daughter. He was born in Frenchtown, Asylum township, April 11, 1799, the place being historic as the home of many nobles who fled from France. He remembers his parents telling of the visit of Louis Philippe, afterward King of France, Talleyrand, LaRochefoucauld, and other noted Frenchmen. The centenarian is the father of twenty children, seven of whom are living. His first wife died 70 years ago and his second wife 30 years ago.

 

Auburn Twp. - Dr. Henry Austin Adams, a former Episcopal clergyman of Buffalo, but now the editor of Donahoe's Magazine, published in Boston, Mass., will give his famous lecture: "The Twentieth Century," at St. Bonaventure's Catholic Church, Friday evening, August 15, under the auspices of the St. Aloysius T.A.B. Society of that parish.

 

Montrose - Work is now under way on the Montrose branch of the Lehigh Valley, which is perhaps better known as the Narrow Gauge, and in a few weeks it will be of standard width, while being jolted and jarred until you feel like a shipwrecked sailor, as has been the experience of nearly all when riding on the Narrow Gauge, will have drifted into oblivion. They are now at a point about eight miles this side of Tunkhannock, where a long, deep cut through rock will take a fortnight or more to complete, but from there on the work will be comparatively easy. A broad gauge engine is now running on the part completed.

 

Susquehanna - In St. Rose Convent, Carbondale, on Thursday, Miss Nellie McCarthy, of this place, took the vow of a novice and, in religion, became Sister Mary Winfield.

 

Howard Hill, Liberty Twp. - During the thunderstorm Sunday evening, Elmer Bailey hurried his cows in the barn, which was almost immediately struck by lightning. He succeeded in getting the cows out again, but the barn and its contents were burned to the ground. No insurance. AND C.D. Berg lost a valuable cow last week. It caught its foot over its horn, which caused its death.

 

Thomson - Harry Bloxham met with quite a loss, Tuesday. While drawing a quarry stone near here, and going down a hill, the reach broke letting the forward part of the load slide off one of the horses, breaking the leg of one, and injuring the other quite badly.

 

Lawton, Rush Twp. - George Graham, Jr., violinist, was professionally engaged at Meshoppen, Wednesday.

 

Herrick Centre - Rumor says that our popular blacksmith, W. Scott Ogden, is soon to take a partner.

 

Hallstead - C.H. Green, of Hallstead, while working on a trestle, at Elmdale, Monday, fell from it and received injuries, which resulted in his being taken to the Lackawanna hospital, at Scranton, where his left arm was amputated. He also sustained a fracture of the skull. While Green was at work he was struck by the big-boom and knocked off the bridge. He is about 35 years of age and married.

 

Ararat - Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shelly will go to house keeping in the upper rooms of the old Potter building.

 

Hopbottom - Can Stone, the popular host of the Foster House, while trolling for pickerel in Loomis Lake, caught a six pound fish. This was probably the largest pickerel ever taken from the waters in this section of the State. When dressed and ready for the oven the fish weighed over 4 1/2 lbs. Can is a boss fisherman.

 

Glenwood - Someone who had on a jag driving through this place on Saturday, came near running down a party of children. AND Sterling Maxson was overcome by the heat and is now suffering with summer complaint; he is 82 years of age and the drain on his constitution is telling on him.

 

August 15 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - In Beebe Park, on Saturday afternoon, the Susquehanna Stars defeated the Great Bend team, and a battery imported from Scranton, 7 and 5. Taylor pitched his first game and it was an excellent one. When is the Montrose team coming over for its medicine? AND The sewerage question still slumbers sweetly.

 

Lanesboro - Mrs. Phoebe Ann Rouse Cook, Amboy, Ill., Aug. 3d, celebrated her 100th birthday. Mrs. Cook was born at Lanesboro and was married in 1823 to Daniel Cook. Two of her children are living, Samuel Cook, aged 75, living at Columbus, Kansas, who was a soldier in the Mexican war, and J.J. Cook, aged 78, who served in the Civil war. Mr. Cook died in 1882, at Sublette, Lee County, Illinois.

 

Brooklyn - An old time picnic by some of the older citizens was held here Tuesday last. As the day was clear, ten o'clock in the morning witnessed many vehicles winding along the hillsides enroute to the home of Milton Palmer, where tables had been erected and seats provided for all who might come. At 12:30 some 55 persons, many of whom had been reared together from childhood, sat down to tables that were loaded with necessaries and luxuries, as none know how to prepare, only those well versed in the culinary art. After partaking of the bountiful repast and feeling as Philadelphia aldermen look, the tables were again filled with watermelon and ice cream, to the satisfaction of the most fastidious taste. After a little interchange of friendly greeting all were invited into the home of the host and hostess where a Scripture lesson was read by Dr. Sage and prayer offered by Mrs. Porter. Many reminiscences of the past were vividly brought to mind, which made our hearts sad, and yet the occasion was one in life, which our minds will wander back to that which will give much satisfaction. After adieus had been said all departed homeward feeling it had been a joy to be there.

 

Great Bend - Mrs. Clark is having her residence on Church street painted bottle green.

 

Howard Hill, Liberty Twp. - The many friends of Elmer Bailey, whose barn was recently struck by lightning, have kindly contributed toward building a new barn-some giving money, others material. A good many have given him hay for his stock. Elsewhere in Liberty Twp.- in Brookdale - The only crow farm in the U.S. is operated by a Brookdale farmer whose name is Billings. Mr. Billings raises the crows for their Beautiful feathers and heads, which are eagerly purchased by milliners. The industry is a paying one, as the young crows are ready for the milliner when two weeks old, and the expense for their keeping is small.

 

Silver Lake - Dr. Lena Caswell, of Binghamton, spent Sunday with friends here, and left for Montrose on the 11th, where she expects to spend one day each week if enough patients apply to make it worth while to take the trip.

 

Silvara, Bradford Co. - On Saturday our boys went over to L. Haire's to cross bats with the Rush team, and lost the game by one count, the score being 8-9 in favor of Rush. But we have no doubt they would have won, had not the other side been made up mostly of picked men from other places; "no fair."

 

Forest City - Forest City still lacks a tax collector, and the borough and poor treasuries are empty, making that unwelcome officer a much-needed blessing to the town.

 

North Jackson - James Kerwin, a North Jackson farmer, has a very intelligent horse which takes a wagonload of milk to the creamery mornings and returns to the bark without a driver, says a correspondent in an exchange. Mr. Kerwin also possesses a very remarkable dog that awakens the family every morning by barking just as the clock strikes five. The owner of these intelligent animals has spent years of patient labor in educating his pets, of whose feats he is justly proud.

 

Montrose - Miss Sue M. Strous, for the past five years a stenographer and for the past two years a student at law in the office of John M. Kelly, was admitted to practice in the several courts of Susquehanna County, at the opening session of Court on Monday morning. Miss Strous enters upon the practice of her profession as the youngest lady member of the bar.

 

Herrick Centre - Charles Foster has moved his shingle mill from Burnwood to the farm of D.O. Price, in West Herrick.

 

Fair Hill, Jessup Twp. -Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Valentine wish to thank their friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted at the haying bee Aug. 12. It was a great help to them, as they had nearly 30 acres yet undone. Those that attended were G. L. Shelp, O.E. Green, Fred Russell, Will Everett, H. Valentine, Fred and Augustus Shelp, Harvey Greenwood, C.C. Burr, Harry Stevens, Earl Very, Frank McKeeby, Robertson and Olin VanAukin.

 

News Briefs - "Jack the Ink-slinger" is a new desperado that haunts Elmira and tosses blots of ink on the dainty summer dresses of women whom he passes after dark. AND A Pennsylvania judge has decided that any dog has a legal right to bite any man, woman or child who disturbs said dog's tranquility and peace of mind by tying to said dog's tail any weight which will impede or tend to impede the progress of said animal, etc. This decision should be largely circulated among small boys and dogs. AND It is reported that many of the lakes in the eastern part of the county are being dynamited by striking miners in order to procure large quantities of fish with little trouble. If apprehended they should be severely dealt with. Absolute starvation would not justify such means of securing fish. AND A visit to the soldiers' camp at Shenandoah at almost any hour of the day will convince even the most skeptical that there is distress among the families of the strikers. Colonel Hoffman says that about 500 women and children come to camp every day with baskets, gathering the scraps of food that are left over from the soldiers' allowance. The soldiers always carefully save what is left after mess, and many of the big-hearted fellows deprive themselves of the best part of their own meals in order to alleviate the sufferings of the wives and children of the miners.

 

August 22 (1902/2002)

 

 

Silver Lake - E. Quinlivan and L.Giblin have hired with Matt Lynch to ditch his swamp.

 

Susquehanna - The Susquehanna School Board at an adjourned meeting last Friday evening unanimously voted for Professor Thomas March, of Easton, as the new principal of the Susquehanna Public Schools. For six years Professor March was principal of the Honesdale Public Schools, and he comes there well recommended. AND John McMahon has opened a meat market on Erie Ave.

 

Great Bend - In the near future the Great Bend Plaindealer will be edited and published by S.P. More & Son, Brother Psalmuel having sold an interest to his son, H.G. More, who will resign from a position with the Pullman company. We hope that the son will prove as capable an editor as his father, and that the Plaindealer will enjoy further successes from this new arrangement. AND The Passing of Landmarks: The mill house and old boarding house at Red Rock caught fire from an engine on the Erie road, it is supposed, two weeks ago, and as they were dry as tinder they were soon burned to the ground. The flying sparks and brands of flame endangered some of Patrick Creagh's buildings which were near, but they were saved from damage. With the sweeping away of the tannery by flood last spring and the destruction of the boarding house, the old landmarks of a one time vigorous industry are about gone.

 

Hallstead - The silk mill force had reached about 45 people last Monday morning and Mr. Shoemaker, the manager, said that within the next two weeks this number would be largely increased. New machinery will be added upstairs, and some of the machines now there put in shape as soon as possible and when the mill is run to its full capacity there will be about 125 to 150 people on the pay roll. After this mill is brought up to its full capacity the company will consider the advisability of enlarging, so as to employ 100 or 200 more hands. This will depend largely upon the prospect of getting what desirable help they would need to run the enlarged mill.

 

Auburn Twp. - Harry Tiffany, of Vose, a Bucknell college student has been taking orders for aluminum cooking utensils throughout the county. They are said to be very good as they are light, strong and durable and never rust.

 

Montrose - The County Fair is to be held Sept. 16 and 17. The society have secured the world famous Yomomo Brothers, Japanese jugglers, of New York city, as one of the attractions. The Japanese beat the world in this kind of entertainment and the people will surely enjoy this feature of the fair. The Harford Cornet Band has been engaged to furnish music. Professor R.A. Seeds, who is well known to Susquehanna county farmers, will give his celebrated humorous lecture, "The Mistakes of Life."

 

Harford - The coming term, music is to be taught in the school.

 

Dimock - Improvements and repairs are being made on Dimock campgrounds under the direction of VanAuken & Parks. Meetings will be held as usual notwithstanding the false report that it would not be held on account of small-pox at West Nicholson. P. Burbank and Terry Whitman are shingling the chapel, boarding house and several cottages. Mail is delivered from the postoffice, on the grounds, daily.

 

Lenoxville - Each of the three merchants are offering prizes to the customers buying goods to the greatest amount during August. Miller and Brownell offer a barrel of flour; C.G. Stephens, a fine rocker, and W.E. Ross, three cash prizes amounting to $6. Mr. Stephens will announce his decision on the evening of Sept. 2d, at which time he will serve ice cream free to all his customers.

 

Lakeside - The steamboat which has been fitted up by Gilbert Williams and Floyd Perry is now plying the waters of Page's Pond to the delight of many pleasure seekers. AND On the night of Aug. 6, some unknown person or persons poisoned three cows belonging to Edson Williams. Upon investigation Paris Green was found to be very adroitly placed in some apples which had been opened and the pieces fitted in again very neatly. In another part of the pasture a Paris Green box was discovered.

 

Ararat - N.A. Walker recently sold his store business to O.F. Potter. Mr. Walker was a candidate for the Republican nomination for register and recorder. It is wondered whether it was a case similar to that of the Republican candidate for sheriff, who once brought his potatoes and stored them in the jail, expecting to be elected sheriff, but was defeated and had to come and get his potatoes.

 

Forest Lake - Nellie Jagger is teaching the Griffis school, Edna Ely the Warner, Mrs. Lee Fessenden the Birchardville, Fannie Warner the Forest Lake, Marion Booth the Hamlin, Mattie Birchard the Stone Street, and Bert Cronk will teach at Forest Lake Center.

 

Thompson - July 23 occurred the death of Mrs. Lucy Ann Gelatt, wife of the late Robt. Gelatt, and daughter of the late Deacon Martin Hall and Emily Lamb Hall, of Jackson. She was born Nov. 11, 1815, at Jackson. She was married in 1837 and moved to Thompson township on a farm soon after marriage, where they lived about 40 years. Then selling the farm they moved to Thompson borough, where they put considerable money and time in the building of the Free Baptist church and parsonage. She taught school before her marriage. She has four living sisters who were able to attend the funeral. They were Mrs. B.H. Larrabee of Lestershire, N.Y., Mrs. A.W. Gates of Thompson, Mrs. Jane Moxley and Mrs. Rosetta Pease of Jackson. One brother, Philander Hall, in the West, was not present. She has two sons, F.M. and E.E. Gelatt, of Thompson, and three daughters, Mrs. W.J. Larrabee, Thompson, Mrs. John Lewis, Hartford, Vt; and Mrs. F.A. Stevens, Keuka Park, N.Y.

 

Clarks Summit - Burglars made a raid on the postoffice one night last week. They were evidently amateurs, as they used so much nitro-glycerin to "crack" the safe that a piece a foot square could not be found after the explosion, while the door of the safe was blown through the roof. If they had been near the safe when the explosive went off they would undoubtedly have been severely injured, if not killed. They obtained no money.

 

A Romance of the Rail: Most everybody has seen the new cards which the Lackawanna Railroad has been putting out this season. They tell a story in a series of bright little jingles that belies the old saying about the course of true love, for in this romance love runs smooth "on the Road of Anthracite" and the wedding feast is served in the dining car before the lovers leave on the train. The entire set of cards has been put into the form of a booklet entitled "A Romance on the Rail." It will be sent free to anyone who will send 2 cents in stamps to cover postage to T.W. Lee, General Passenger Agent, 26 Exchange Place, New York City.

 

August 29 (1902/2002)

 

 

Elk Lake - An acetylene nickel-plated lamp for [an] automobile carriage was lost on the road between Elk Lake and Montrose a short time ago. Finder will be rewarded by leaving [it] at this office.

 

New Milford - John J. Smith, for many years a highly respected resident of New Milford township, died on Friday, Aug. 15, aged 80 years. The funeral services were conducted from the M.E. church in this place and interment [was] in the village cemetery. The deceased had been a resident of New Milford township 50 years, and for the past 36 years had resided on the farm where he died. He was born in Fishkill, N.Y. When he first came to this county he lived on he L.A. Smith place which adjoins the farm he subsequently owned and occupied the greater part of his busy, useful life. He was a molder by trade and during the war he molded shells for use in that great struggle for civil rights. Farming was his principal occupation and by industry from it he accumulated in store so that in old age he was privileged to rest from his labors. He is survived by six sons: Benjamin T., of Binghamton; Albert and Henry, of Montrose; Charles, of New Milford; Ralph B., of Canton, Pa., and Fred W., of Scotland, Pa.

 

Oakland - At noon, on Thursday last, at Oneonta, N.Y., by Rev. T.F. Hall, Presiding Elder, Rev. Webster M. Bouton, the able and popular pastor of the Oakland M.E. church, and Miss Bernice Carrier, one of Oakland's most estimable young ladies, were united in marriage. A host of friends wish them all manner of success and happiness. They will be at home to their friends after Sept. 19.

 

Uniondale - A Delaware and Hudson freight train was derailed at Uniondale on Sunday morning, caused by a pusher engine crowding the flat cars up against the heavier ones. The train was ditched and several cars were badly damaged.

 

Springville - On Wednesday, Sept'r 3, the survivors of Co. C, 203 Pennsylvania Volunteers [Civil War], will meet with comrade Culver, in this village, for their 4th annual reunion.

 

South Gibson - About 2 o'clock Wednesday morning our community was awakened by the cry, "Fire," which proved to be the large barns on the farm of Dana Winans; many hurried to the scene but were too late to be of any service. The house was saved, but all the outbuildings were burned, also one horse, harnesses, wagons, reaper, mower, besides a large number of new shingles stored in the barn. No insurance.

 

Harford - School began Monday with George Stearns, principal; Carolyn Brewster, assistant; Nina Moore, primary. About 70 pupils on roll. AND The Tingley-Tiffany reunion was held at the historical log cabin at Harford, originally built in 1795 and rebuilt in 1895. The cabin is on the Tingley farm and by the side of an orchard which was planted over 100 years ago. There were about 75 present and all enjoyed a good time. There were balloon ascensions and various kinds of out door sports. This was the first reunion which Deacon Tingley has missed, but owing to poor health he was unable to attend.

 

Forest City - The Young People's Society and Ladies' Aid of the Forest City Baptist church, recently agreed to give their pastor help to pay the rent of a house rather than to let him go elsewhere.

 

Glenwood - J.B Swartz has been taking a well-earned vacation by taking in the seven-county reunion [Civil War veterans]. There were present nearly 1500 old vets and about 5000 visitors. The old soldiers have a warm spot in the hearts of the people. May it always be there. The next reunion is to be held in Binghamton.

 

Brooklyn - We have received a catalogue gotten out in the interest of the Brooklyn Graded schools, of which M.W. Stephens is principal. It sets forth the advantages of the school, its curriculum, and matters of interest to its alumni. The teachers are as follows: Grammar department, Bessie Chamberlain; Intermediate, Hettie Caswell; Primary, Mary Hearn.

 

Ararat - The friends of N.A. Walker, who was a prominent candidate for the nomination for Register and Recorder, are much hurt at the treatment he received and the sidetracking he got. And so are Frank Gere's (of Brooklyn). And the friends of W.N. Barnes, they are mad all over, the way he was pushed aside.

 

Lenox - The annual Rynearson reunion was held at the Loomis Lake church near the home of "Aunt" Lydia Gardner, in Lenox, on Saturday, August 16th. The day was all that could be desired and the relatives and friends, to the number of about 150, assembled at an early hour and friendly greetings, hand shaking and visiting was enjoyed by all. A long table and seats were prepared in the yard near the church, flags decorated the leafy covering overhead, and as the noon hour approached the table was loaded down with many of the best productions that the culinary art could prepare.

 

Montrose - A meeting of the Montrose Co-operative Canning Co. is called for Tuesday, Sept'r 2, at 3 o'clock in the Arbitration room of the Court House.

 

Susquehanna - Sixteen carloads of Erie shipmen, their families and friends, enjoyed an excursion to Shohola Glen on Saturday. It was a pleasant trip without accident.

 

Jessup - Our Grange is in a flourishing condition and meets every two weeks. AND Rhinevault and son are doing a big business in grinding and blacksmithing.

 

News Brief - It is predicted that a coal famine will be a sure thing. It will occur no matter how soon mining is resumed. The first work of the railroads after the resumption of mining will be to carry coal to the Great Lakes so that it can be delivered to up-lake ports before navigation is closed by ice. New York and New England will not be supplied until snow flies, and poor people who buy by the pail full will be unable to secure coal, unless they are able to plank down its weight in gold.

 

Court Notes: The Brushville Baptist Church was incorporated and C.T. Thorpe was appointed tax collector of Forest City.

 

September 05 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - Joseph Taylor, jr., the Susquehanna Stars crack [baseball] player, has returned to his home in Chicago. AND The Honesdale club was expected to play in Susquehanna to day, but it declined to come. Honesdale's club much prefers to play in its own dooryard.

 

Great Bend - Mrs. Bronk, an aged lady, is nearing the end of life's journey. AND Workmen are engaged in tearing down the steeple of the Methodist church, which was racked by the windstorm several weeks ago.

 

Retta (Auburn Twp.) - Under the auspices of the Young People's Society ice cream and other light refreshments will be served Saturday afternoon and evening, Sept. 6, at the residence of Griswold Carter. Among the attractions will be a ball game in the afternoon and music, recitations, etc., in the evening. In Auburn Center a very enjoyable reunion of the Lott family was held on the farm of Leander Lott, late Friday. Eight brothers were present and played a game of ball against a nine from Rushboro and Retta; the score was 23-6 in favor of the brothers.

 

Forest Lake - E.S. Lake is driving stage from Montrose to Friendsville.

 

Liberty Twp. - On Sat., Aug. 30th, the Luce family held their annual gathering at the home of S.W. Luce. Ninety-seven relatives and friends were present and enjoyed a social time; and at 12 o'clock, Ernest J. Fish and Miss Jennie Luce, daughter of S.W. Luce, were united in marriage in the presence of the assembled company by Elder W.C. Tilden. A bountiful dinner was served for all; the Lawsville Band, by their presence and delightful music, added much to the pleasure of the occasion.

 

Rush - Mrs. Florette Miller and son Donald have given about 100 nicely bound volumes to Trinity Public Library. The gift includes a full set of Scott, Dickens and Roe. S.B. McCain has presented a number of books, and others have given books and current magazines. The books are free with the usual library restrictions. The thanks of the lovers of good literature are due Mrs. Miller as the idea of a public library here originated with her. Books may be had at 12 to 1 on Sunday, and 7:30 to 9:30 Thursday evenings.

 

Lawsville Center - G.W. Lindsley, an old and highly respected citizen, died Tuesday p.m., Aug. 19. He was born in Delaware county, NY, Feb. 5, 1831, and was the second son of Azar and Mary Worden Lindsley. At the age of 25 years he came to Susquehanna county and since then has been a resident of said county. At the age of 31 years he married Mary J. Lockwood, daughter of Elkanah and Caroline Lockwood, who died Jan 18, 1902. He leaves two sons, M.E. and George W., and one daughter Etta J. Lindsley, besides a large circle of acquaintances to mourn his loss.

 

Montrose - At the Susquehanna County Fair in Montrose, N.E. Bissell, the Church St. grocer, offers 3/4 barrel of Washburn & Crosby's Gold Medal flour for the best loaf of bread made from said flour; 1/2 barrel for the second best; 1/4 barrel for 3d best; 1/4 barrel for best 1 doz. bisquits made from said flour; all flour to be purchased at his store.

 

Lenox - Considerable of a blow Sunday. Many fruit trees were blown down and O.D. Roberts had the top blown off his buggy. He and his wife and son, Claude, together with E.D. Bell, of Nicholson, and Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Brown, were calling at Cosey Nook cottage during the storm.

 

Alford - Engineer Spence, of L. & M. Railroad, running between Montrose and Alford, who is numbered among the most prominent residents of the county seat, is waging warfare against the snakes who have their home at the dam of the long pond at Alford and assisted by Conductor Wilmot and the train crew, promises to go down in history as a successful snake exterminator.

 

Forest City - Because there was no [tax] collector in Forest City, and the schools were likely to be crippled for want of funds that were justly due, Prof. C.T. Thorpe, of Forest City, accepted, on the grounds of good citizenship and duty as he saw it, the collectorship, and is now proceeding with the work. The citizens of Forest City ought to appreciate this move on the part of Prof. Thorpe, and pay their taxes promptly, thus saving him much work that he ought not to be called upon to do.

 

Harford - There will be a platform dance at the Harford Fair, afternoon and evening, Sept. 25. A fine new platform has been erected outside. The Brevier orchestra, which gave such excellent satisfaction last year, will furnish music.

 

Uniondale - It seems to us, farmers will do well to note the fact that fat stock of all kinds are bringing good prices. It has been a good many years since buyers have shipped fat cattle from these parts to the large city markets. S.H. Bronson has already sent several cars of cattle, sheep and hogs to New York.

 

New Milford - Clarence Snyder, of East Lenox, has begun his vocation as principal of the New Milford schools.

 

Springville - James Blakeslee is the loser of a vicious horse; instead of killing someone, she made a finale of herself. Getting enraged, she threw herself backwards, striking her head on a stone and killing herself instantly.

 

Dimock - Charles Main is getting his cider mill ready to grind the farmer's apples when the weather is cooler.

 

News Briefs - Persons having a tendency to in any way meddle with the rural free delivery boxes should bear in mind that they are liable to a fine of $1,000 or three years imprisonment for so doing. Better let them alone. AND President Roosevelt had a narrow escape from death yesterday. Secret Service Agent Craig was killed and Driver Pratt received a fractured skull, and the President was slightly bruised and cut, their carriage being struck by an electric car near Pittsfield, Mass. The carriage was smashed to pieces. The motorman and conductor of the trolley car were arrested. AND Hon. Otis Avery, of Honesdale, has completed his 94th year and still has the distinction of being the oldest practicing dentist in the world.

 

September 12 (1902/2002)

 

 

Susquehanna - Joseph Taylor, jr., the Susquehanna Stars crack [baseball] player, has returned to his home in Chicago. AND The Honesdale club was expected to play in Susquehanna to day, but it declined to come. Honesdale's club much prefers to play in its own dooryard.

 

Great Bend - Mrs. Bronk, an aged lady, is nearing the end of life's journey. AND Workmen are engaged in tearing down the steeple of the Methodist church, which was racked by the windstorm several weeks ago.

 

Retta (Auburn Twp.) - Under the auspices of the Young People's Society ice cream and other light refreshments will be served Saturday afternoon and evening, Sept. 6, at the residence of Griswold Carter. Among the attractions will be a ball game in the afternoon and music, recitations, etc., in the evening. In Auburn Center a very enjoyable reunion of the Lott family was held on the farm of Leander Lott, late Friday. Eight brothers were present and played a game of ball against a nine from Rushboro and Retta; the score was 23-6 in favor of the brothers.

 

Forest Lake - E.S. Lake is driving stage from Montrose to Friendsville.

 

Liberty Twp. - On Sat., Aug. 30th, the Luce family held their annual gathering at the home of S.W. Luce. Ninety-seven relatives and friends were present and enjoyed a social time; and at 12 o'clock, Ernest J. Fish and Miss Jennie Luce, daughter of S.W. Luce, were united in marriage in the presence of the assembled company by Elder W.C. Tilden. A bountiful dinner was served for all; the Lawsville Band, by their presence and delightful music, added much to the pleasure of the occasion.

 

Rush - Mrs. Florette Miller and son Donald have given about 100 nicely bound volumes to Trinity Public Library. The gift includes a full set of Scott, Dickens and Roe. S.B. McCain has presented a number of books, and others have given books and current magazines. The books are free with the usual library restrictions. The thanks of the lovers of good literature are due Mrs. Miller as the idea of a public library here originated with her. Books may be had at 12 to 1 on Sunday, and 7:30 to 9:30 Thursday evenings.

 

Lawsville Center - G.W. Lindsley, an old and highly respected citizen, died Tuesday p.m., Aug. 19. He was born in Delaware county, NY, Feb. 5, 1831, and was the second son of Azar and Mary Worden Lindsley. At the age of 25 years he came to Susquehanna county and since then has been a resident of said county. At the age of 31 years he married Mary J. Lockwood, daughter of Elkanah and Caroline Lockwood, who died Jan 18, 1902. He leaves two sons, M.E. and George W., and one daughter Etta J. Lindsley, besides a large circle of acquaintances to mourn his loss.

 

Montrose - At the Susquehanna County Fair in Montrose, N.E. Bissell, the Church St. grocer, offers 3/4 barrel of Washburn & Crosby's Gold Medal flour for the best loaf of bread made from said flour; 1/2 barrel for the second best; 1/4 barrel for 3d best; 1/4 barrel for best 1 doz. bisquits made from said flour; all flour to be purchased at his store.

 

Lenox - Considerable of a blow Sunday. Many fruit trees were blown down and O.D. Roberts had the top blown off his buggy. He and his wife and son, Claude, together with E.D. Bell, of Nicholson, and Mr. and Mrs. W.E. Brown, were calling at Cosey Nook cottage during the storm.

 

Alford - Engineer Spence, of L. & M. Railroad, running between Montrose and Alford, who is numbered among the most prominent residents of the county seat, is waging warfare against the snakes who have their home at the dam of the long pond at Alford and assisted by Conductor Wilmot and the train crew, promises to go down in history as a successful snake exterminator.

 

Forest City - Because there was no [tax] collector in Forest City, and the schools were likely to be crippled for want of funds that were justly due, Prof. C.T. Thorpe, of Forest City, accepted, on the grounds of good citizenship and duty as he saw it, the collectorship, and is now proceeding with the work. The citizens of Forest City ought to appreciate this move on the part of Prof. Thorpe, and pay their taxes promptly, thus saving him much work that he ought not to be called upon to do.

 

Harford - There will be a platform dance at the Harford Fair, afternoon and evening, Sept. 25. A fine new platform has been erected outside. The Brevier orchestra, which gave such excellent satisfaction last year, will furnish music.

 

Uniondale - It seems to us, farmers will do well to note the fact that fat stock of all kinds are bringing good prices. It has been a good many years since buyers have shipped fat cattle from these parts to the large city markets. S.H. Bronson has already sent several cars of cattle, sheep and hogs to New York.

 

New Milford - Clarence Snyder, of East Lenox, has begun his vocation as principal of the New Milford schools.

 

Springville - James Blakeslee is the loser of a vicious horse; instead of killing someone, she made a finale of herself. Getting enraged, she threw herself backwards, striking her head on a stone and killing herself instantly.

 

Dimock - Charles Main is getting his cider mill ready to grind the farmer's apples when the weather is cooler.

 

News Briefs - Persons having a tendency to in any way meddle with the rural free delivery boxes should bear in mind that they are liable to a fine of $1,000 or three years imprisonment for so doing. Better let them alone. AND President Roosevelt had a narrow escape from death yesterday. Secret Service Agent Craig was killed and Driver Pratt received a fractured skull, and the President was slightly bruised and cut, their carriage being struck by an electric car near Pittsfield, Mass. The carriage was smashed to pieces. The motorman and conductor of the trolley car were arrested. AND Hon. Otis Avery, of Honesdale, has completed his 94th year and still has the distinction of being the oldest practicing dentist in the world.